Oil for maximum cleaning?

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Dec 15, 2010
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I’ve posted a couple of threads about my 2009 Scion with the oil burning 2az-fe engine so I won’t elaborate here and just jump straight to the question. What oil and change interval would you use if you were trying to flush out your oil control rings? I was thinking a synthetic 0w-20, but that’s mostly because I have a few bottles of Harvest King I don‘t need. Maybe a couple of 2000 mile changes and then reasses?

The engine specifies 5w-20 or 0w-20. I know Royal Purple has a lot of detergents so maybe a jug of it to start?
Read GM service bulletin TSB# 10-06-01-008M:

https://f01.justanswer.com/ebrock63...il+Consumption,+MIL+ON,+Engine+Runs+Rough.pdf

for fixing stuck oil control rings and oil consumption. Our 2007 gasoline 6.2L all aluminum L92 in our 07 Yukon Denali w/130k miles had this problem when we purchased it used. I used Gunk brand Motor Medic, not the GM TSB stuff, and did the piston/combustion chamber soak over a weekend through the spark plug holes. I moved the crankshaft back and forth a few times with the balancer bolt.

Engine now has 178k miles and doesn't consume any oil between extended changes.
 
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It should be, since it's called Ultraclean
Check out the VOA
That’s a few years old but if it’s still the same it looks impressive.
 
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Check out the VOA
That’s a few years old but if it’s still the same it looks impressive.
How does a VOA show an oil has better cleaning vs not?
 

OVERKILL

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For me it was the high Calcium levels. Calcium is a detergent. Typically it's around 1200ppm but in the Ultraclean VOA it's 2451.
Detergents don't really "clean", their forte is keeping things clean by neutralizing acids and preventing particulate and contaminants from plating out. They work with dispersants, which prevent agglomeration, which of course can also lead to them falling out of suspension.

For actual cleaning, you need AN's or esters; something polar that can actively work to free deposits from surfaces.
 
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Detergents don't really "clean", their forte is keeping things clean by neutralizing acids and preventing particulate and contaminants from plating out. They work with dispersants, which prevent agglomeration, which of course can also lead to them falling out of suspension.

For actual cleaning, you need AN's or esters; something polar that can actively work to free deposits from surfaces.
Okay, cool. Good to know.

So let me rephrase that then. It's called Ultraclean and it advertises: "Its double-action formula has been proven to clean away the sludge that can block engine oilways* and helps prevent new sludge formation". What stands out in its VOA is much higher than normal Calcium, which is a detergent.
 

OVERKILL

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Okay, cool. Good to know.

So let me rephrase that then. It's called Ultraclean and it advertises: "Its double-action formula has been proven to clean away the sludge that can block engine oilways* and helps prevent new sludge formation". What stands out in its VOA is much higher than normal Calcium, which is a detergent.
Right, but you can't see any of the base oil blend.

Let's look at it this way:
If this oil has a splash of AN's or esters in it, to provide a bit of cleaning ability, then its detergent/dispersant package is also going to have to be more robust to deal with those contaminants as they are freed from surfaces and enter the oil stream. Ergo, in that context, the higher levels of calcium make sense.
 
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Are you a chemist? Your equivocation of two different statements is troublesome to me. OP should try Kreen.

What do you mean? A high based calcium sulfonate detergent additive contains calcium alkylbenzene sulfonate and calcium carbonate basic salt with the formula [R-SO3]2Ca(CaCO3)n. Same with magnesium. The root is the carbonate as the neutralizing agent. My statement is an attempt to simplify the function of the calcium and magnesium that shows up in a VOA/UOA. Perhaps a bit too oversimplified.

I am not a chemist.
 

Elkins45

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This is $1.11 a bottle at Rural King. Since esters make good cleaners I wonder if dribbling a little bit into the oil might help?
 

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What do you mean? A high based calcium sulfonate detergent additive contains calcium alkylbenzene sulfonate and calcium carbonate basic salt with the formula [R-SO3]2Ca(CaCO3)n. Same with magnesium. The root is the carbonate as the neutralizing agent. My statement is an attempt to simplify the function of the calcium and magnesium that shows up in a VOA/UOA. Perhaps a bit too oversimplified.

I am not a chemist.
I was a chemist. Your statements were factually wrong, whatever their intentions. That is all. Have a good day.
 
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Comparing tums for neutralizing acid in one’s stomach to overbased calcium sulfonate neutralizing acid in your crankcase is actually an analogy I use when explaining titration for base number doing lab tours. It is a great way to connect something common for which people are more likely to remember.

And on topic, AN’s and Esters are your friend if you want something that cleans.
 
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M1 High Milage Synthetic is the easiest to find and has extra cleaning additives - I have run for short OCI's in a new / used vehicle for the first couple of oil changes with good results .
 
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