Ferrari 812 Superfast Oil Consumption

AEHaas

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Just to show what we are talking about:
 

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Bottom line is, the engine was designed to consume oil. Depending on temperatures, rpm and oil grades and types it will be a bit more or a bit less.

I would start to worry if oil consumption stopped...

Curious if this kind of powerful engines are designed to consume oil or if they can not be designed not to consume oil?

If they are designed to consume oil, is that to provide adequate piston lubrication? otherwise it may run into moft or cooling issues due to heat and possibility of very high rpm?

I would have also guessed that the manufacturer would specify a more sophisticated ACEA type of oil (e.g. one of those MB, BMW, Porsche , VW ... approvals ) but that doesn't seem to be the case ... which kind of makes sense based on what @Sonofsonof was saying.
 
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I'm guessing they add clearances or run special seals on the valve stems to keep them from seizing. I haven't checked how much power these engines make, but a LOT of power makes for a LOT of heat in certain components, like exhaust valves, pistons and piston rings. If so, they could become tighter when really hot, maybe too tight with regular clearance.

It's all good if you're only going to put your foot down for 5 or 10 seconds at a time, but what if it's minutes of full power? Don't think many of the big HP engines can actually do it without throwing their toys out of the pram...
 
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I went to my car after viewing the parts diagram. The oil stick MIN mark is actually a little bit above one of the vapor lines. Oil over this mark just pours and is sucked into it. The very bottom of the stick should be the real MIN mark and the line on the stick marked as the MIN line now should be the MAX line. Completely ignore the stick's MAX mark. The stick is no more than a foot long and the marks are in the middle of it.
Does the manual say to check the oil level when the engine is running or stopped? I believe there may be some vehicles with a dry sump oiling system that say checked the oil in the holding tank when the engine is idling. Check the manual.
 
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That said, I have a very vague recollection of Wankel engines specifying Group I engine oil because it's easier to burn. Wankel rotors are fundamentally more difficult to seal than conventional pistons so the 'burnability' of oil is a much more relevant issue.

Wankels are designed to burn oil in order to keep them lubricated - they use an oil injection pump system. The seals that were hard to seal were the apex seals between the 3 chambers formed by the rotor, and were to seal combustion. The oil side seals worked better than the apex seals.
 

AEHaas

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Oil check procedure per the manual:

Run the warm engine up to and hold at 4,000 for one minute. Then let the engine idle. Wait 2 minutes but no more than 3 minutes to check the oil level with the engine still idling.

I have experimented and found the following to occur:
If you check the oil within 15-20 seconds there is no oil on the stick (remember it is only a foot long in total).
At a little more than 2 minutes the level (now) is just below the MIN mark.
If you check it at 3 minutes and 4 minutes it stays just below the MIN mark. I have not waited any longer than this.
If you shut the engine off it drifts, over hours, below the level of the bottom of the stick.

AEHaas
 
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I'm guessing they add clearances or run special seals on the valve stems to keep them from seizing. I haven't checked how much power these engines make, but a LOT of power makes for a LOT of heat in certain components, like exhaust valves, pistons and piston rings. If so, they could become tighter when really hot, maybe too tight with regular clearance.

It's all good if you're only going to put your foot down for 5 or 10 seconds at a time, but what if it's minutes of full power? Don't think many of the big HP engines can actually do it without throwing their toys out of the pram...

Interesting! Maybe the engine would burn less when hot & "tight" and more in the zone when driven fast and/or in higher rpm as oppose to a casual drive.
 
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I would think so if my theory is correct. That's to say, if it didn't, the oil consumption would skyrocket... as it does with any worn out engine being run hard.
 
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Sounds like the oil checking procedure needs to be done exactly the same every time with the car in the same exact spot every time if it varies that much based on how much time goes by before checking the dipstick.
 
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