Hyundai engine failures getting news again

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Originally Posted by aquariuscsm
This story is why I'll never understand the extended oci crowd. Some people have good luck with the long intervals, or is it just luck after all? Oil is so cheap,keeping it changed and clean is more important than the brand imo.
I used to be that way then I saw the UOA on my wife's Impreza crosstrek showing better wear and insol results and usable remaining TBN than the unit average at a much breifer 6K miles. That was with the Top shelf Valvoline Advanced Synthetic and a high mileage driving regimen in temperate climate that would allow an extended OCI. I'm sending off an 8200mil UOA sample with the less costly Magnetec 5W20 and we will see how that stuff compares soon ... If we get results before Christmas/Chanukah from Blackstone. smile I'm VERY curious.
 
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I've been fortunate enough to have all my cars do +150k miles and one (my old Toyota) doing over 300k and all got their oil changed regularly between 3~5k miles with new filters each time. I see no reason to change up that strategy at this point.
 
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Originally Posted by Mad_Hatter
I've been fortunate enough to have all my cars do +150k miles and one (my old Toyota) doing over 300k and all got their oil changed regularly between 3~5k miles with new filters each time. I see no reason to change up that strategy at this point.
You have to be careful talking like that around here, it can get you into trouble........... wink
 
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sometimes its good to read the links before armchair commenting. In Canada they have regular and severe service.. then they try to tell everyone after the fact that all of Canada is severe service.. which makes no sense.. why have a "regular" maintence schedule then.. at least in the summer Canada is a much better climate than many places. Also these engines are dying in mass quantities from manufacturing debris left in engine. Not a hyundai hater.. have had 7 in the family(1 personally). this is pretty questionable warranty dodging IMO.
 
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Hey Overkill, i was just going to post a link to the same story. The comments (on CBC's website) are interesting. There's obviously a lot of misunderstanding out there. I've never owned a Hyundai, but don't think they're bad vehicles. (Our Kia Sedona van, which we've passed on to the younger generation, has been a very good vehicle.) My thoughts: - CBC's writers are not usually very informed about mechanical/automotive stuff, so predictably they glossed over the long OC intervals and instead focused on the consumers' rights/big bad corporation side of the story. - 20K km oil changes are way too long for most people's driving patterns, regardless of oil quality. - Regardless, the engine's failure was likely due to the known manufacturing defect regarding debris left in the block. (Although I wonder if more frequent oil changes would have flushed out the debris faster, prolonging the life of the engine.) - It's too bad that the indy garage installed a used engine from an engine family that has well-known failures. Perhaps they told the fellow that x % of these engines do fail prematurely, and we can't provide a warranty for the engine itself. - It seems to me that Hyundai should have offered to pay half of the $10K new engine cost up front, given the history of that engine family and confounding factor of the long oil changes.
 
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It wasnt clear whether he only changed the oil every 20k kms or if he just didnt have receipts...very poor article, misses alot of details. He should have known better if that was the case, granted its a known issue so it shouldnt happen either way...negligence with a product known to fail...dealer should have split the cost on a replacement and educate him to change his oil on time.
 

OVERKILL

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Originally Posted by vw7674
just having fun, i.e.the 'chief' reference, the operator is in charge of the OCI of his own vehicle, & it being eight years old, I doubt there is any free engine coming his way, 10,000 mile change interval or 12,000 mile interval, if you value your vehicle you won't be pushing that hard, + installing a good used engine & exposing to the exact same abuse seems........abusive. Maybe he should seek a claim from the lubricant manufacturer that recommended he run 12,427 miles per change?
My take from what Hyundai stated was that if he had continued with the dealer/OEM OCI schedule, that the first replacement engine would have been covered due to the recall. I assume this would have been in the form of reimbursement, as he didn't get the recall notice until after the first engine was replaced.
 

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Originally Posted by demarpaint
Originally Posted by aquariuscsm
This story is why I'll never understand the extended oci crowd. Some people have good luck with the long intervals, or is it just luck after all? Oil is so cheap,keeping it changed and clean is more important than the brand imo.
+1 It sure makes a good case for not extending OCI's, even after the warranty it up. Even if TBN shows it safe, and wasteful to some for dropping "good oil" early. hide
Yup, that's my take. You never know when something might come up out of warranty that might be covered by a recall, that can apparently be soundly torpedoed by not adhering to the OEM maintenance schedule out of warranty.
 
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Originally Posted by CKN
This topic has been beaten to death. We know how it goes on BITOG-the vocal Hyundai haters. I would have you look at my previous post-but it looks like the whole thread was deleted when I called a couple people out. horse
Keep calling ...Ž. And keep buying them because sooner or later they will just have to fix their mess . It's only been since 2010 . All I can say is look at the evidence, read the Hyundai forums, check the trade in values and let the facts speak for themselves.
 

CKN

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Originally Posted by Driz
Originally Posted by CKN
This topic has been beaten to death. We know how it goes on BITOG-the vocal Hyundai haters. I would have you look at my previous post-but it looks like the whole thread was deleted when I called a couple people out. horse
Keep calling ...Ž. And keep buying them because sooner or later they will just have to fix their mess . It's only been since 2010 . All I can say is look at the evidence, read the Hyundai forums, check the trade in values and let the facts speak for themselves.
Currently there is a big mess with the Ford DCT. I could list EVERY MANUFACTURER that has had serious issues in the last 20 or so years. BTW-resale values are not far behind other vehicles in their class. Check the Ford diesels forums for the 6.0 mess as well. Or maybe the SIlverado forums for early issues (07) on the 5.3 and AFM issues. Those are "facts" as well.
 
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Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by vw7674
just having fun, i.e.the 'chief' reference, the operator is in charge of the OCI of his own vehicle, & it being eight years old, I doubt there is any free engine coming his way, 10,000 mile change interval or 12,000 mile interval, if you value your vehicle you won't be pushing that hard, + installing a good used engine & exposing to the exact same abuse seems........abusive. Maybe he should seek a claim from the lubricant manufacturer that recommended he run 12,427 miles per change?
My take from what Hyundai stated was that if he had continued with the dealer/OEM OCI schedule, that the first replacement engine would have been covered due to the recall. I assume this would have been in the form of reimbursement, as he didn't get the recall notice until after the first engine was replaced.
I don't understand why he didn't take it upon himself to look up any recalls after the first motor blew?? I would have never relied solely on the word of the dealership once they told him it was gonna be $10k to replace it. I would have been on the horn immediately to Hyundai raising holy heck. And IMO it was pretty crappy for the other shop to not look up any recalls too.
 

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Originally Posted by Mad_Hatter
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by vw7674
just having fun, i.e.the 'chief' reference, the operator is in charge of the OCI of his own vehicle, & it being eight years old, I doubt there is any free engine coming his way, 10,000 mile change interval or 12,000 mile interval, if you value your vehicle you won't be pushing that hard, + installing a good used engine & exposing to the exact same abuse seems........abusive. Maybe he should seek a claim from the lubricant manufacturer that recommended he run 12,427 miles per change?
My take from what Hyundai stated was that if he had continued with the dealer/OEM OCI schedule, that the first replacement engine would have been covered due to the recall. I assume this would have been in the form of reimbursement, as he didn't get the recall notice until after the first engine was replaced.
I don't understand why he didn't take it upon himself to look up any recalls after the first motor blew?? I would have never relied solely on the word of the dealership once they told him it was gonna be $10k to replace it. I would have been on the horn immediately to Hyundai raising holy heck. And IMO it was pretty crappy for the other shop to not look up any recalls too.
My understanding of the timeline, and I could be wrong: - Engine fails. He takes it to dealership, he was not aware of any recall, dealer makes no noises about a recall. Dealer may not have received the notice yet. Dealer quotes 10K, he balks, goes to an indy for a salvage engine. - He receives a recall in the mail a while later for the issue - Replacement engine from the indy fails - He visits dealer with recall notice. He's denied reimbursement for the original engine because he didn't follow OEM OCI schedule. He's denied replacement of the 2nd engine because it wasn't done at the dealer.
 
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While the article is slightly ambiguous about whether he only changed the oil every 20 000 km, or just that his receipts only verify every 20 000 km and he had it changed more frequently, something is weird here. "After getting the recall notice, Lingard submitted his receipts to Hyundai Canada. It rejected the claim, saying his first engine failure was due to "insufficient engine maintenance, not the recall" because Lingard didn't do sufficiently frequent oil changes prior to 100,000 kilometres of driving, and didn't provide receipts for subsequent changes. The company says he changed his oil every 20,000 kilometres instead of every 12,000 as required by the manual. After the warranty expired, Lingard says he stopped going to the dealership for oil changes. " The implication, if I'm reading it correctly, is that during the warranty he took it to the dealer for oil changes every 20 000 km. Then he stopped taking it to the dealer, presumably (though unverified) took it elsewhere, and couldn't produce receipts. The fact that at no point does he claim otherwise makes me think this is true. Assuming my interpretation of the article is accurate, denying coverage makes sense. He didn't stick to the manufacturer OCI in the time he had it serviced at the dealer, then had unverifiable service history after that. I wouldn't expect him to be able to produce every receipt, but it seems like the record at the dealer indicates he was already not having the oil changed soon enough. The article is ambiguous enough that it's hard to understand the whole situation here.
 

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The real problem here, is the shady mechanic who won't warranty the 2nd engine blowing. That should be on the mechanic through his own warranty.
 

wdn

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The mechanic who replaced the original engine is the one responsible to warranty the replacement engine. The owner got sold a used engine by an independent mechanic. KIA has no part of it. Where did the engine come from, the junk yard? He bought an engine with no warranty to save a few thousand? As soon as the owner took the engine to an independent mechanic instead of the KIA dealer for engine replacement, it was no longer a manufacturer issue. Even with a GM vehicle unless you buy a factory-blessed crate motor from GM and have a GM certified master mechanic install it, you are pretty much on your own. As for the manufacturer being able to fall back on oil change receipts or lack thereof, well Canadian law is not American law.
 
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Originally Posted by Nick1994
The real problem here, is the shady mechanic who won't warranty the 2nd engine blowing. That should be on the mechanic through his own warranty.
Not necessarily shady if the motor was at the time of install considered a customer supplied part, which case it's reasonable to expect the shop to only cover labour. But that's conjecture, I only know what's in the article like everyone else. Hyundai isn't gonna deny a claim just because you can't find a receipt or two. I think wondrous is right, the records must have shown a prolonged deviation from the prescribed maintenance schedule. He certainly wouldn't be the first human on the planet to do so.
 
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Originally Posted by Whammo
Of all the recalls from all the manufacturers, this one seems to get a new thread every month or more.
I think that's simply because it continues to generate new news shrug Hence the article in the OP.
 

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Originally Posted by WondrousBread
While the article is slightly ambiguous about whether he only changed the oil every 20 000 km, or just that his receipts only verify every 20 000 km and he had it changed more frequently, something is weird here. "After getting the recall notice, Lingard submitted his receipts to Hyundai Canada. It rejected the claim, saying his first engine failure was due to "insufficient engine maintenance, not the recall" because Lingard didn't do sufficiently frequent oil changes prior to 100,000 kilometres of driving, and didn't provide receipts for subsequent changes. The company says he changed his oil every 20,000 kilometres instead of every 12,000 as required by the manual. After the warranty expired, Lingard says he stopped going to the dealership for oil changes. " The implication, if I'm reading it correctly, is that during the warranty he took it to the dealer for oil changes every 20 000 km. Then he stopped taking it to the dealer, presumably (though unverified) took it elsewhere, and couldn't produce receipts. The fact that at no point does he claim otherwise makes me think this is true. Assuming my interpretation of the article is accurate, denying coverage makes sense. He didn't stick to the manufacturer OCI in the time he had it serviced at the dealer, then had unverifiable service history after that. I wouldn't expect him to be able to produce every receipt, but it seems like the record at the dealer indicates he was already not having the oil changed soon enough. The article is ambiguous enough that it's hard to understand the whole situation here.
Solid take IMHO. There's definitely enough ambiguity regarding his situation that it makes it impossible to decipher the exact series of events and circumstances. The other couple, who had an engine fail in the same manner, but isn't covered under the recall campaign doesn't help with the optics here.
 
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