Strut shaft spins when I try to remove the top nut (strut won't come out.)

Messages
199
First of all, a 1/2" drive impact would have zipped that right off.

If you are careful, you can use locking pliars with a rag for protection to hold the shaft from spinning. I work on race cars and do this all the time, especially when that strut isn't getting reinstalled.
 

lizpat

Thread starter
Messages
147
Location
New YOrk
Here's what I have decided to do:

I'm going to use a channel lock to grip the strut shaft, and to generate enough clamping force on that polished strut shaft, I'm going to use numerous zip ties to hold that channel lock in place AND I'm going to use a clamping tool as well.

This seems ridiculous, but it might work.

As for the pipe wrench, I'll try that next if that doesn't work but I have my doubts. Since the pipe wrench clamps by tightening that adjusting wheel, I can't see how my fingers can adjust with enough force.. but it's worth a shot
 
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2,469
Location
SD
If you can get a flat wrench on it, you may can get a nut splitter on it.

A nut splitter would be my next try. Simple and inexpensive...
1618753509977.jpg
 
Messages
6,684
Location
Scruffy City
Here's what I have decided to do:

I'm going to use a channel lock to grip the strut shaft, and to generate enough clamping force on that polished strut shaft, I'm going to use numerous zip ties to hold that channel lock in place AND I'm going to use a clamping tool as well.

This seems ridiculous, but it might work.

As for the pipe wrench, I'll try that next if that doesn't work but I have my doubts. Since the pipe wrench clamps by tightening that adjusting wheel, I can't see how my fingers can adjust with enough force.. but it's worth a shot

I seriously doubt that channel locks (AKA Slip Joint Pliers) will do it. You need Vice Grips (Locking Pliers)
 

Astro14

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13,390
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Virginia Beach
Impact gun on top nut, brap brap brap brap zing.
They don’t have one. Limited tools, not even a Dremel or locking pliers. Channel locks will just slip.

For those who advocate locking pliers, they’re good, multi-use tools, they generate a small fraction of the grip and torque of a pipe wrench. The locking pliers can clamp with, at very best, a hundred lbs of pressure. On chrome, that’s not enough. They’ll slip. The clamping force is set when you squeeze them.

The pipe wrench increases clamping force as the jaws get more and more pressure from the handle being torqued. They generate thousands of lbs of pressure as the jaws lock onto the surface. There is no comparison between locking pliers, or pump pliers, and a pipe wrench. Like comparing a tack hammer with a sledge hammer.

Locking pliers and channel locks (I’ve got several versions of each) are great, but they do best with flat surfaces to grip. On smooth round surfaces, they don’t grip enough. Pipe wrenches, by their design, don’t slip. That’s why they’re used on pipes...

When the chrome slips under your channel locks, and you decide shop for a pipe wrench, get a good one, made in the US, with hardened jaws. Skip the Chinese junk, with soft jaws, they’re fine for iron pipe, but not this use.
 
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2,932
Location
Kentucky
As for the pipe wrench, I'll try that next if that doesn't work but I have my doubts. Since the pipe wrench clamps by tightening that adjusting wheel, I can't see how my fingers can adjust with enough force.. but it's worth a shot

Pipe wrenches don't clamp by tightening the adjusting wheel. The adjusting wheel is just to get the jaws to a place where you can slip them over what you're turning. The grip is applied by the pressure you put on the wrench. The more pressure you put on it, the more it digs in. The jaws are at an angle to each other, so they only grip when turning in one direction, and releases in the other; sort of gives it a racheting action.

I think a pipe wrench would work just fine, in my mind it would work better than a pair of vice grips, which tend to slip easily on smooth hardened surfaces like that of a strut rod. If you can get the pipe wrench to get the initial bite (which will score the rod some), that rod shouldn't go anywhere.

I also like the cut-the-nut approach, have had to do that a few times and it works well if you can get the dremel in there.

Interesting strut design, I've always worked on the kind where the center nut comes off last, once spring spring tension has been accounted for. Learn something new every day.
 
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1,047
Location
Upper midwest
So, it comes down to either a vice grip or a pipe wrench then.. I have doubts that I am strong enough to create the necessary force to get it to bite properly..

BUT, I do have an idea: I can use a CLAMP TOOL for the purpose of clamping on the vise grip (or perhaps channel lock) to generate the necessary force. (LOL, it might work......)
It's a tiny nut that is NOT welded on. Use heat and it is done, it ready is as simple as that. Works every time. If it was cross treaded cut it off with a Dremel and call it a day. It is a 10 minute job at best both ways.
 
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3,413
Location
USA
Heat would ruin the rubber bushing the OP likely intends to reuse.

If there is nothing else holding the spring tension when a strut nut is removed, parts can go flying dangerously as the spring releases. I assume in this design you leave the bottom end of the strut attached to the suspension to compress the spring?
 
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13,459
Location
North Carolina
Heat would ruin the rubber bushing the OP likely intends to reuse.

If there is nothing else holding the spring tension when a strut nut is removed, parts can go flying dangerously as the spring releases. I assume in this design you leave the bottom end of the strut attached to the suspension to compress the spring?
Yes a different design than what i'm used to. I assume with no body nuts to remove the strut as a unit, you remove the top nut, raise the car, then with spring tension gone, remove the strut knuckle bolts.
 
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13,459
Location
North Carolina
They don’t have one. Limited tools, not even a Dremel or locking pliers. Channel locks will just slip.

For those who advocate locking pliers, they’re good, multi-use tools, they generate a small fraction of the grip and torque of a pipe wrench. The locking pliers can clamp with, at very best, a hundred lbs of pressure. On chrome, that’s not enough. They’ll slip. The clamping force is set when you squeeze them.

The pipe wrench increases clamping force as the jaws get more and more pressure from the handle being torqued. They generate thousands of lbs of pressure as the jaws lock onto the surface. There is no comparison between locking pliers, or pump pliers, and a pipe wrench. Like comparing a tack hammer with a sledge hammer.

Locking pliers and channel locks (I’ve got several versions of each) are great, but they do best with flat surfaces to grip. On smooth round surfaces, they don’t grip enough. Pipe wrenches, by their design, don’t slip. That’s why they’re used on pipes...

When the chrome slips under your channel locks, and you decide shop for a pipe wrench, get a good one, made in the US, with hardened jaws. Skip the Chinese junk, with soft jaws, they’re fine for iron pipe, but not this use.
I agree. A locking vice grip can work with a stout impact, used as i mentioned. But with hand tools, a pipe wrench is better.
 

Astro14

$100 Site Donor
Staff member
Messages
13,390
Location
Virginia Beach
Here's what I have decided to do:

I'm going to use a channel lock to grip the strut shaft, and to generate enough clamping force on that polished strut shaft, I'm going to use numerous zip ties to hold that channel lock in place AND I'm going to use a clamping tool as well.

This seems ridiculous, but it might work.

As for the pipe wrench, I'll try that next if that doesn't work but I have my doubts. Since the pipe wrench clamps by tightening that adjusting wheel, I can't see how my fingers can adjust with enough force.. but it's worth a shot
I just read this awful misconception.

The threaded nut adjusts the wrench.

Properly adjusted, the hook jaw pivots in the base, providing direct clamping force. The leverage is multiplied several-fold though the angle of the handle to the jaw, and the location of the pivot.

Used properly, it grips with several times the clamping force of locking pliers. It was designed for turning pipes, and it generates an order of magnitude more grip than either locking pliers, or channel locks.

Probably worth Googling how to actually, properly, use a pipe wrench before dismissing it.
 
Messages
1,015
Location
Alberta
by the look of the picture, why not cut straight through the hex (stripped) shaft and the nut with a hacksaw. you'll end up with two nut halves and a slot down the center of the shaft. Might take a while and possibly a couple of blades if the metal is hardened, but it's simple.
 
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26,449
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
If that is the actual car an impact will blow that right off, its not even rusted. Before doing anything take a thick folded beach towel and a piece of cardboard box to protect the windshield.
As others have posted a small pipe wrench will hold strut shaft with no problem. That is very common strut mounting design.
 
Last edited:

lizpat

Thread starter
Messages
147
Location
New YOrk
They don’t have one. Limited tools, not even a Dremel or locking pliers. Channel locks will just slip.

For those who advocate locking pliers, they’re good, multi-use tools, they generate a small fraction of the grip and torque of a pipe wrench. The locking pliers can clamp with, at very best, a hundred lbs of pressure. On chrome, that’s not enough. They’ll slip. The clamping force is set when you squeeze them.

The pipe wrench increases clamping force as the jaws get more and more pressure from the handle being torqued. They generate thousands of lbs of pressure as the jaws lock onto the surface. There is no comparison between locking pliers, or pump pliers, and a pipe wrench. Like comparing a tack hammer with a sledge hammer.

Locking pliers and channel locks (I’ve got several versions of each) are great, but they do best with flat surfaces to grip. On smooth round surfaces, they don’t grip enough. Pipe wrenches, by their design, don’t slip. That’s why they’re used on pipes...

When the chrome slips under your channel locks, and you decide shop for a pipe wrench, get a good one, made in the US, with hardened jaws. Skip the Chinese junk, with soft jaws, they’re fine for iron pipe, but not this use.
I'm convinced!

This is what I'll do. What you wrote makes perfect sense! I didn't know pipe wrenches work that way.

UPDATE: I got lucky with the other side, no stripping. I still have to work on this side though, off I go.
 
Messages
3,413
Location
USA
Hondas used to be made so that the hood could open to a practically vertical position, and there was another place to put the prop rod. Basically no need to ever remove hood even to R&R engine.

Do not raise it to the high position outdoors in windy weather though.
 
Messages
6,005
Location
down in the park
I’m concerned about the design of your struts. The struts I’ve worked on are bolted to the body by a couple of nuts that hold the strut plate.

That hex head top nut holds the spring seat in place. You do the top nut AFTER the strut is out and the spring compressor has removed the tension from the nut.

Are you certain that you should be unbolting this top nut? Is the spring tension accounted for?

Got a picture of your car?
there's another nut below that pad, astro
 
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