Shell HX5 15w40 formulation

Joined
Dec 10, 2013
Messages
729
Location
Kuala Lumpur ,Malaysia
The heat generated by shear in the oil would be most significant at operating temperature and both are 40-grade oils. The winter rating would make no difference at all especially in Malaysia.
Between a Helix 15W40 and 5W40, considering its base oil, which is more resistant to coking in the turbo ?
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
80
Between a Helix 15W40 and 5W40, considering its base oil, which is more resistant to coking in the turbo ?
That's a hard question to answer. Base oil wise I'd say the 5W40 would edge it but remember the VII polymer loading also plays a role in Turbo deposit formation & the 15W40 will win out on that score.

One thing to bear in mind is that the tiny, superbly designed turbos you might see today on a modern, 1.0 litre 3-pot GDI are completely different beasts from the big monster turbos of old, that could glow red hot & fry your oil in no time flat.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2013
Messages
729
Location
Kuala Lumpur ,Malaysia
That's a hard question to answer. Base oil wise I'd say the 5W40 would edge it but remember the VII polymer loading also plays a role in Turbo deposit formation & the 15W40 will win out on that score.

One thing to bear in mind is that the tiny, superbly designed turbos you might see today on a modern, 1.0 litre 3-pot GDI are completely different beasts from the big monster turbos of old, that could glow red hot & fry your oil in no time flat.
Hi Sonof, I drive a 32 year old 2L Inline 6 Twin turbo (stock), so my guess they would glow red hot. If i am not wrong, one of the selling point of GTL Helix Ultra is resisting turbo deposits formation.
I guess also that the 5W40 would be "saving the children" compared to the 15W40.
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
80
Hi Sonof, I drive a 32 year old 2L Inline 6 Twin turbo (stock), so my guess they would glow red hot. If i am not wrong, one of the selling point of GTL Helix Ultra is resisting turbo deposits formation.
I guess also that the 5W40 would be "saving the children" compared to the 15W40.

I can't argue with your logic. That said, you do realise the world had changed since 1989 don't you? You might be better served thinking about what car you drive rather than what oil you use in your engine...
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2013
Messages
729
Location
Kuala Lumpur ,Malaysia
I can't argue with your logic. That said, you do realise the world had changed since 1989 don't you? You might be better served thinking about what car you drive rather than what oil you use in your engine...
Nah aint changing my car, I love the 80s and wanna drive an 80s car till I croak, and I don't drive it everyday either, I have no need to drive everyday.My allusion to "save the children" is primarily to quote what you have said earlier, but not as direct ultimate goal, just a mere lesser between two evils proposition, if you get me,
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
80
I spent a lot of the late '80s living just down the road from you in Singapore. Didn't do too much business in Malaysia back then but I got up to Port Dickson a couple of times. Also spent many a happy hour doing nothing on Tioman & Langkawi.

Thinking about it, quite a bit of the engine oil you could find on your shelves for most of the Noughties was 'mine'. Happy days!
 

M119

Thread starter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
589
Location
Brittany, France
Completely agree SR5, making what's existing last as long as it can is a wise decision both environmentally and financially. What would made actual sense would to build a simple car that could last 3 000 000 km and the lifetime of a person and we have the tehcnology to do that. Let's reissue a car from the 90s that is simple and yet has all the needed safety and confort and build it with a stainless body, upgraded engine parts etc.
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
80
Completely agree SR5, making what's existing last as long as it can is a wise decision both environmentally and financially. What would made actual sense would to build a simple car that could last 3 000 000 km and the lifetime of a person and we have the tehcnology to do that. Let's reissue a car from the 90s that is simple and yet has all the needed safety and confort and build it with a stainless body, upgraded engine parts etc.

Interesting comments. I suspect a lot of what you want is going to come to pass... just not the way you're imagining.

Over here in the UK, from 2030 (ie in just 9 years time), the stated policy is you'll no longer be able to buy a conventional petrol or diesel car. Importantly nor will you be able to buy a conventional hybrid (like a Prius) because it won't be able to go the requisite distance on battery power alone. The future, we are told is pure EV!

Or it? EVs, even with subsidies, are ferociously expensive; at least double their ICE counterparts. The charging infrastructure doesn't exist; nor does adequate power generation capacity for a wholesale changeover. And then there's the range issue, especially in winter, where 125 miles max is optimistic.

So what will ACTUALLY happen as opposed to what idiot politicians say will happen? I think people will try & keep their existing ICE cars going for as long as possible. No doubt conventional motoring taxes will be significantly ramped up (starting soon?) with lots of fancy words about 'the green revolution' & the need to pay for the pandemic. People will I think just pay more for hanging on to the advantages an ICE confers. I honestly wonder if my little Suzuki, with its 72 mpg fuel economy, will become an object of desire, as opposed to a social embarrassment!

In a way, we're set to become the new Cuba, where they still have cars from the 1950s on the roads. Hurrah for us!
 

SR5

Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
6,162
Location
Down Under
Completely agree SR5, making what's existing last as long as it can is a wise decision both environmentally and financially. What would made actual sense would to build a simple car that could last 3 000 000 km and the lifetime of a person and we have the tehcnology to do that. Let's reissue a car from the 90s that is simple and yet has all the needed safety and confort and build it with a stainless body, upgraded engine parts etc.
Looks like my previous post with link to a science article, that you responded to, has been deleted.

Oh well .... comme ci comme ça.
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
449
Location
Rahui Pokeka Aotearoa
. No doubt conventional motoring taxes will be significantly ramped up (starting soon?) with lots of fancy words about 'the green revolution' & the need to pay for the pandemic. People will I think just pay more for hanging on to the advantages an ICE confers.
Yes, EV won't become cheaper, but ICE will become more expensive. A beat up old ICE won't be identified with the poor, it will become the icon of the rich.
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
80
Yes, EV won't become cheaper, but ICE will become more expensive. A beat up old ICE won't be identified with the poor, it will become the icon of the rich.

Right now, EVs are expensive to buy but incredibly cheap to run. However this is primarily because both petrol & diesel are very heavily taxed (typically 65 - 70% of the pump price is tax) whilst domestic electricity hardly bears any taxation at all (just 5% VAT in the UK). This is simply not sustainable in the long-term. At some point, taxes on EVs must rise substantially. Rather than taxing power directly, this may take the form of road pricing with the tolls collected going into the general government tax pot. Whichever way I look at the future, I see basic transport getting more expensive, perhaps prohibitively so for a lot of people. I'm glad I lived my life when I did!
 
Joined
Jun 6, 2015
Messages
488
Location
VA, US
When everyone/majority will be running EV's, then politicians will ramp up the taxes on those too. Maybe using GPS trackers for miles driven, maybe a special flat fee like in some of more "progressive" US states.
The road maintenance budget pressure doesn't decrease, regardless of "green" propaganda.

Also, the charging infrastructure is non-existent. It's fine and dandy now to charge one EV for every block, but if something like 80% or the cars will be plugged in houses at 5PM, that will crush the power distribution system.

I think that Hydrogen was a better alternative than electricity storage in batteries. But political donations and corporate minds have different interests.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
186
Location
Brazil
That's a hard question to answer. Base oil wise I'd say the 5W40 would edge it but remember the VII polymer loading also plays a role in Turbo deposit formation & the 15W40 will win out on that score.

One thing to bear in mind is that the tiny, superbly designed turbos you might see today on a modern, 1.0 litre 3-pot GDI are completely different beasts from the big monster turbos of old, that could glow red hot & fry your oil in no time flat.

Good to be able to read your posts again!

If i may, i would like to know your opinion on this:

What would you rather use in a 80-90's 4 cylinder SOHC/NA engine that runs only with E100, a PCMO with only API SN or a HDEO that is E7/SL/ 228.3, both being 15W40?
 

M119

Thread starter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
589
Location
Brittany, France
I'll highjack my own thread rather than making another one. Cheap oils are somewhat interesting to me. There are other options available at the bottom of the shelves. 15€ offers you the HX5 15W40 discussed earlier as well as a 10W40 made by Avia (SN/CF, A3/B4-16, MB approved). The absolute cheapest oil available for only 12€ will be the Avia 15W40 (SL/CF, A3/B4-16, MB approved). This one is A3/B4-16 which is rare for a 15W40 and has an HDEO-like HTHS of 4.3. Would you also consider these two oils? Here are the TDS, not available in english unfortunately but numbers are what they are.
 

Attachments

  • Avia 10W40.pdf
    101.4 KB · Views: 3
  • Avia 15W40.pdf
    109.5 KB · Views: 3
Top