Kia K5 GT oil suggestions

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mobil 1 afe 0w30. i use it year round. good for antarctica to florida.
Not an oil to use in a high strung, turbo Filly.
To much VM and only a semi-syn regardless of what the label says.

I am sure it works well for you in your climate in normal pass car usage.
It's got to, it meets current API and ILSAC specs.
 

SilverFusion2010

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So far the Euro 5w-30s seem to be the only ones that are comparable to the M1 HM 10w-30 in terms of noack and HTHS. What's your take on the M1 ESP 0w-30? that is the only other 0w-30 I see that Mobil offers
 
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So far the Euro 5w-30s seem to be the only ones that are comparable to the M1 HM 10w-30 in terms of noack and HTHS. What's your take on the M1 ESP 0w-30? that is the only other 0w-30 I see that Mobil offers
I you are asking me I don't have a vehicle that specs that oil. There are many on here that use it or similar with stated good results.

The only caution is that some are low saps and require low sulfur fuel. Castrol or ?? Oil of the proper grade spec'd with approvals for a high output turbo VAG engine would likely work well. I would not worry about cost of the oil.
 

SilverFusion2010

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I you are asking me I don't have a vehicle that specs that oil. There are many on here that use it or similar with stated good results.

The only caution is that some are low saps and require low sulfur fuel. Castrol or ?? Oil of the proper grade spec'd with approvals for a high output turbo VAG engine would likely work well. I would not worry about cost of the oil.
One more question... you suggested I wait about 10k miles before I run the thicker A3 oil. Why?
 
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The only caution is that some are low saps and require low sulfur fuel. Castrol or ?? Oil of the proper grade spec'd with approvals for a high output turbo VAG engine would likely work well. I would not worry about cost of the oil.
Isn't gasoline required to have only 10ppm now, well at least averaged over the year, although it can possibly be up to 95ppm in a single batch, but our fuel should be pretty low sulfur by now, but even then, it's a Hyundai/Kia so you shouldn't be running extended interval anyways so even if the gas is high sulfur with a low/mid SAPS oil it shouldn't be a problem since you should be changing the oil in a Hyundai between 3000-5000mi in most cases.
 
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I'm not running it because it's "high mileage" oil. I have been running this oil for years because it's a thick 30 grade instead of a Resource Conserving 30 grade that's really just barely above a 20 grade for thickness. This M1 oil also has a higher HTHS than many other 30 grade oils on the shelf today. Viscosity at 100C is 12 cst, most 30s are closer to 10.

Basically that bottom end is under massive load when the boost comes on, and you have to allow for some fuel dilution from the GDI. At least I do.
The engineers at kia are making really great motors. My stinger gt, tuned is making well over 450 wheel torque. A 5w30 will be just fine. Running a 10w30 is just causing unnecessary drag in the motor.
 
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Not during the majority of operation, only briefly during low temperature starts. They are both still 30-grade oils.
By nature a 3.5 hths will have more drag. If the motor needed a 3.5 hths it would call for it. The tolerances are probably tight.
 
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By nature a 3.5 hths will have more drag. If the motor needed a 3.5 hths it would call for it. The tolerances are probably tight.
Tolerances don't have anything to do with it. And the HT/HS is independent of the winter rating, there are some 30-grade oils with a winter rating of 5W that also have a high HT/HS, as do some with a 0W winter rating. Winter rating isn't the determining factor.
 
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Yes I had heard this before. The small Honda turbo motors also seem to have severe issues with fuel dilution.

I'm actually running premium right now in the hope that I can reduce or eliminate any potential dilution by reducing the need to run such a rich mix. My understanding is that OEMs set up the fuel and timing maps such that the primary control of detonation is through using GDI to cool the cylinder. Which is cool and all but I think there's a better way, and that way is running better fuel!

I have to get through the break-in period and probably another 5-10k miles past that before I can get a good baseline on a UOA. For now I'm operating with an abundance of caution. Except with my right foot... it's not cautious at all :D
Despite them being hard on oil. H/K offer very nice drive experience.
 
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Tolerances don't have anything to do with it. And the HT/HS is independent of the winter rating, there are some 30-grade oils with a winter rating of 5W that also have a high HT/HS, as do some with a 0W winter rating. Winter rating isn't the determining factor.
There are plenty of charts on here showing fuel efficiency and hths. 2.9 hths is the sweet spot.
The car is making 116 hp/ liter. The CTR is making over 150 and is specced a 20 weight...
 

SilverFusion2010

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I'm not concerned with fuel economy. Protecting this high-output engine is my priority. Yes thinner oils will save fuel, but not as dramatically as you think. I'd rather stay in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime instead of counting on my boundary layer additives to save the bottom end when I floor the accelerator. Hydrodynamic = parts separated by oil. Boundary layer = metal on metal with the additive pack creating a sacrificial layer. There is still wear occurring in the Boundary layer lubrication regime. This is precisely why I am looking at the thicker 30s. So while your contribution is appreciated, you've missed the point.

EDIT

Also, you've made several references to "tolerances" when what you really meant was "clearances". Bearing clearances haven't changed much in decades. The tolerances the parts are manufactured to have tightened up because of improvements in manufacturing technology. This means a much shorter break-in period because everything fits better... not tighter, better. More consistent from engine to engine coming off the assembly line. Tolerances have squat to do with oil requirements.

This is a technical topic, please educate yourself on the proper nomenclature.
 
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I'm not concerned with fuel economy. Protecting this high-output engine is my priority. Yes thinner oils will save fuel, but not as dramatically as you think. I'd rather stay in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime instead of counting on my boundary layer additives to save the bottom end when I floor the accelerator. Hydrodynamic = parts separated by oil. Boundary layer = metal on metal with the additive pack creating a sacrificial layer. There is still wear occurring in the Boundary layer lubrication regime. This is precisely why I am looking at the thicker 30s. So while your contribution is appreciated, you've missed the point.

EDIT

Also, you've made several references to "tolerances" when w5hat you really meant was "clearances". Bearing clearances haven't changed much in decades. The tolerances the parts are manufactured to have tightened up because of improvements in manufacturing technology. This means a much shorter break-in period because everything fits better... not tighter, better. More consistent from engine to engine coming off the assembly line. Tolerances have squat to do with oil requirements.

This is a technical topic, please educate yourself on the proper nomenclature.
Clearances are also becoming tighter to improve efficiency. You are trying to find a "better" oil than what the manufacturer recommends by talking "sacrificial" AKA full shear; Which has been covered and can be accomplished with a quality 0w30 or 5w30. As I stated, you are trying to find better protection for a car making less power per liter than every other turbo 4 cyl on the market. Pennzoil 5w30 has a higher htfs.
 

SilverFusion2010

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You did not say Pennzoil Platinum Euro 5w-30. You said Pennzoil, and the regular Pennzoil Platinum has HTHS of 3.1 per your own data.

Nomenclature. look it up.
 
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