Are you brand loyal (like my dad)?

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184
Location
Virginia, USA
Hello every one. I was wondering, are you brand loyal no matter what or do you change brands? Take my dad for example. He was raised on Ford vehicles. That is all he has ever bought or owned. He worked for a Motorcraft parts warehouse for 32 years. He only uses Motorcraft oil, Motorcraft filters, spark plugs, batteries, etc. You get the idea. His reasoning behind this is based on his experience with the brand. The company delivery vans were always bought new, were always Ford, and always given Motorcraft parts. The engines would go well in to the 300000 mile range. The batteries would last 7-8 years, spark plugs would go over 100000 miles, etc. My dad is 69 years old and basically believes in keep it simple, and if it ain't broke don't fix it. Dad is old school. 3000 mile oil changes. Dad's feelings are that an oil change is easy and cheap. A replacement engine is not cheap.
 
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13,616
Location
Frisco, TX
No, because I think it's narrow-minded (no offense to your dad or anything). Giants rise and fall, and you have to look at things objectively.
 
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1,427
Location
NY
I am not brand loyal. I am quality loyal. If something is of good quality or value whether its oil or a part i choose that. But if that item goes downhill in quality or value and a better item turns up i will buy the new item instead.
 
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3,590
Location
Ohio
I believe in the best value in a given situation. Oil is what ever name brand dino is at the best price. Batteries (right now) are Advance Auto Parts purchased on line with a discount code. Filters are whatever name brand is at the best price. Some things do really matter IMO. I like OEM for plugs, and some other specialized parts, for example a cam synchro for a 3.0 vulcan.
 
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5,108
Location
Columbus,Nebraska
I remember that there was a lot of controversy among mechanics when Chrysler changed over to alternators about 1960. Some mechanics didn't understand alternators, didn't want to learn, and showed their ignorance by condemning what proved to be a huge step forward.I had plenty of generator problems, but I have never had an alternator problem since I purchased my first new vehicle in 1964.I also heard a lot of negative talk about ABS after some makers began offering it in the late eighties. No fool like an old fool.
 
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3,872
Location
southern mo
Your dad's loyalty in my opinion is noble. My grandpa was like that only bought mopar only used valvoline champion plugs wore Levi 501 jeans Tony llama boots. It was those things are nothing. It can be close minded but it's not a bad thing..more people need loyalty these days and staying loyal means you are familiar with the brand . He worked for them to so they butter his biscuit he should be loyal to them in my opinion.
 
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14,732
Location
Central NY
Originally Posted By: HosteenJorje
I remember that there was a lot of controversy among mechanics when Chrysler changed over to alternators about 1960. Some mechanics didn't understand alternators, didn't want to learn, and showed their ignorance by condemning what proved to be a huge step forward.I had plenty of generator problems, but I have never had an alternator problem since I purchased my first new vehicle in 1964.I also heard a lot of negative talk about ABS after some makers began offering it in the late eighties. No fool like an old fool.
The early ABS systems would kill the brakes completely and not "pulsate" from what I understand.
 
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11,844
Location
PA
Originally Posted By: dparm
No, because I think it's narrow-minded (no offense to your dad or anything). Giants rise and fall, and you have to look at things objectively.
Ditto. The closest things to exceptions in my life are Michelin tires and Puma shoes. I just don't buy anything else if I have the choice. But that's only because, as far as I know, there are no reliably better alternatives. As soon as that changes, I'm out.
 
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3,566
Location
Somewhere
It depends really... Since I drive Fords, I've usually used the Motorcraft oil filters. Cheap, do a good job, and designed for the application. Although I'm venturing out into Fram Ultras. For oil, I've been liking SOPUS stuff - Pennzoil Platinum for mine and High Mileage for hers. For parts - it's a tossup. Plugs usually are Motorcrafts because I've heard others can cause issues. Other parts usually OEM as they fit better. Twice on the wife's car I've been burned on parts store parts that are "supposed" to fit but don't. Once was a coolant temp sensor and the other was the e-brake cable. Neither fit at all. The Motorcraft parts were perfect fits. Brakes are usually non OEM's. Batteries are a mix of DieHard and Motorcraft. Most times the difference in OEM vs non OEM is a few $$ and I'll gladly pay that for something I know will fit perfect.
 
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509
Location
VA
Originally Posted By: s1mp13m4n
Hello every one. I was wondering, are you brand loyal no matter what or do you change brands? Take my dad for example. He was raised on Ford vehicles. That is all he has ever bought or owned. He worked for a Motorcraft parts warehouse for 32 years. He only uses Motorcraft oil, Motorcraft filters, spark plugs, batteries, etc. You get the idea. His reasoning behind this is based on his experience with the brand. The company delivery vans were always bought new, were always Ford, and always given Motorcraft parts. The engines would go well in to the 300000 mile range. The batteries would last 7-8 years, spark plugs would go over 100000 miles, etc. My dad is 69 years old and basically believes in keep it simple, and if it ain't broke don't fix it. Dad is old school. 3000 mile oil changes. Dad's feelings are that an oil change is easy and cheap. A replacement engine is not cheap.
My dad was like that too and I guess it rubbed off on me somewhat.
 
Last edited:

s1mp13m4n

Thread starter
Messages
184
Location
Virginia, USA
Originally Posted By: ram_man
Your dad's loyalty in my opinion is noble. My grandpa was like that only bought mopar only used valvoline champion plugs wore Levi 501 jeans Tony llama boots. It was those things are nothing. It can be close minded but it's not a bad thing..more people need loyalty these days and staying loyal means you are familiar with the brand . He worked for them to so they butter his biscuit he should be loyal to them in my opinion.
My dad is one of those people who does believe in supporting the business that helps support you. Dad for example would buy a new Ford from the same dealership that bought Motorcraft parts from him. By the dealer buying parts from dad, dad gave back bu buying a car from them. My dad has a 1961 Ford Galaxie which he has owned since 1976. The car has a Motorcraft battery in it and Motorcraft FL-1A under the hood. He does this because when he shows the car at a cruise in, you see genuine Ford parts and not a store brand battery and no name filter. Thanks for your input.
 
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24,382
Location
Central Florida
For me its: NGK plugs Purolator filters closeout (any brand) motor oil Honda ATF and MTF for our transmission Chevron Techron or Redline injector cleaner Yokohama tires
 
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3,377
Location
Wildwood, FL
I registered my M35 with the Quaker State mileage program, I'm sticking with Quaker State oil on this car, but I don't expect to keep the car for 300K miles to cash in on the offer. It's a marketing and consumer confidence thing. For my recent Honda and Acura vehicles, I have favored Kendall, 76 Super and Conoco Phillips brands now under the Phillips 66 refining house. But I will be trying Lubrigold synthetic from Warren Oil (not WPP) as I got a case at $3.60 a quart. So brand loyal? Yes to an extent, but pricing, availability and value also matter. To me it comes down to quality at a decent price.
 
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1,981
Location
Greatest Earth on Show, UT
I am loyal to a brand as long as that brand is loyal to me. Once I find a quality product at a good price, I will stick with it and will not go out of my way to find an alternative. But as soon as quality goes down or price goes up to an unreasonable level, I will hit the market to see if someone has something better to offer. Case in point, my current ISP. We have been with AT&T Uverse for several years and things have generally worked out well. We have been having speed issues lately, so I am looking to change providers, which looks like it will net me higher speeds at lower costs. If Uverse hadn't dropped the ball, they would have had no worries about losing me.
 
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13,194
Location
Maricopa Arizona
Your Dad was brand loyal to his employer. To have a company and a individual show loyalty to each other is an lost practice today. It worked well for him and it worked well for Ford. Win Win.
 
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3,897
Location
Canada
My dad used to be brand loyal to Volvo when I was growing up. Years later he realized all the fun and cheap parts and maint. he was missing out on. Now he swears he'll never own another Volvo, and I can't blame him. It's turning into a generational thing. And yes, giants rise and fall. It's just a matter of time. BMW is the next one I see falling....give them a few years
 
Messages
202
Location
California
Originally Posted By: dave1251
Your Dad was brand loyal to his employer. To have a company and a individual show loyalty to each other is an lost practice today. It worked well for him and it worked well for Ford. Win Win.
Yet it doesn't make sense to be loyal to a company. Their products have to perform, and if a competitor beats them, it is common sense to switch to the better product.
 
Messages
13,194
Location
Maricopa Arizona
Originally Posted By: boundarylayer
Originally Posted By: dave1251
Your Dad was brand loyal to his employer. To have a company and a individual show loyalty to each other is an lost practice today. It worked well for him and it worked well for Ford. Win Win.
Yet it doesn't make sense to be loyal to a company. Their products have to perform, and if a competitor beats them, it is common sense to switch to the better product.
With this common sense you just lost your job. How could you not perform your job better and push your employer to produce a better product?
 
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