Antiseize on oil filter canister threads?

blupupher

Site Donor 2021
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7,063
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Katy, Republic of Texas
I am with others. No need for antiseize. Just make sure to change and lube the o-ring.

Wow!

Some people confuse spin-on canisters with cartridge filter housing caps?
Where do you see this? I don't see anyone confusing the two.

Question is, do you know what the Toyota canister filter housing looks like?
 
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1,843
Location
California
Wow! Some people confuse spin-on canisters with cartridge filter housing caps?

Yes :( I don't understand it either. Just one example:
As a side note, my Volvo XC90 5Cyl has a plastic canister and it works just fine.
The plastic canister on the newer Tacomas (I have a 2013 Tacoma 4 lt. with a spin on filter) seem to be extremely difficult to remove the first time but if you change your own oil you won't over torque it and future removals will go much easier.

The only plastic oil filter is the cartridge type where the inner element is replaced but the housing is reused.
Canister filters are always metal, they are self-contained and replaced as a unit.
I'm happy to know if I am wrong... please show me a canister oil filter made of plastic.
 

Pablo

Thread starter
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47,951
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Everson WA - Pacific NW USA
Canister filters are always metal, they are self-contained and replaced as a unit.
I'm happy to know if I am wrong... please show me a canister oil filter made of plastic.
Not exactly wrong, just half right.

First of all for automotive applications there clearly two main types of oil filter units, both are canisters. One is the spin on, fully contained filter which some people happen to call "canister" or "oil filter"(perhaps a regional thing) and the other canister is obviously the removable cap and housing structure/body on the engine or mount. (Filter cartridge within formed canister). They both function essentially the same, the oil is captive within the canister as it flows through the filter element.

The canister is the can, not the filter element.
 
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18,456
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NH
I just bring to snug. When I feel it bottom out, I'm done. 150k on one car, 80k on the other, both still have the plastic bit. I keep a metal housing around but just never got around to swapping in--figured I'd wait until it cracked. Still waiting...
 
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1,843
Location
California
Not exactly wrong, just half right.

First of all for automotive applications there clearly two main types of oil filter units, both are canisters. One is the spin on, fully contained filter which some people happen to call "canister" or "oil filter"(perhaps a regional thing) and the other canister is obviously the removable cap and housing structure/body on the engine or mount. (Filter cartridge within formed canister). They both function essentially the same, the oil is captive within the canister as it flows through the filter element.

The canister is the can, not the filter element.
Fair enough. My understanding of the two oil filter types was simply canister vs. cartridge.
Now we get to say "spin on, fully contained filter" vs "filter cartridge with formed canister." LOL :D Just kidding with you bruh.
I never cared for the term "spin on." Sounds like something a kindergartner would say.
 
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3,199
Location
Western S.C.
Fair enough. My understanding of the two oil filter types was simply canister vs. cartridge.
Now we get to say "spin on, fully contained filter" vs "filter cartridge with formed canister." LOL :D ...
I never cared for the term "spin on." Sounds like something a kindergartner would say.
At least "spin-on" is unambiguous. If "cartridge" still has the original meaning to some people, while others apply it to cartridge filters, perhaps that term is best avoided to minimize confusion and misunderstandings.
 
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