$235 million attraction

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10,611
Location
Las Vegas NV
Since Mark only thinks people should care if the problems are local to them, I heard about some information about our little local money pit. http://www.lvrj.com/news/48018807.html
 Quote:
The Springs Preserve posted small gains in attendance and revenue during its second year of operation, but it still required almost $9.3 million in operational help from the Las Vegas Valley Water District. By the time the fiscal year is closed out at month's end, more than 206,000 people will have visited the preserve and spent nearly $1.8 million there. That's about 9,000 more visitors and $204,000 more income than the attraction saw in year one. All told, however, the 180-acre collection of interactive exhibits, green buildings and desert plants has absorbed nearly $20 million in subsidies since the water district opened it on June 8, 2007. And that's not counting the roughly $160 million the state's largest water utility kicked in for construction of the $235 million attraction. The district will spend the next 25 to 30 years paying that bond money back with interest.
 Quote:
Of the 206,142 visitors to the preserve over the past year, about 95,000 were paying customers. Before the preserve opened, midrange projections called for it to draw approximately 600,000 visitors in the first 12 months, most of them tourists. With two years now in the books, the attraction is still well short of that first year figure, and tourist traffic remains almost nonexistent. The facility attracted roughly 8,500 out-of-town visitors during its second year, a decline even from the 9,300 tourists it saw in year one. That's a far cry from the district's stated goal of capturing about 1 percent of the local tourism market. After all, 1 percent of 37.5 million people -- the number drawn to Las Vegas in 2008 -- is 375,000.
I've been out to this place (I paid) and it's neat but is it worth $235 million? NO. It's also the kind of thing that once you've been there, there isn't much need to go back.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Messages
44,859
Location
New Jersey
Does the district actively promote science and technology? Does it suggest the acceptance of advanced technologies? Do the subsidies keep small businesses with innovative products that we will ultimately want/need up and going? Nobody, especially folks in the rainy NE, NW, SE, etc. will likely ever adapt water preservation - guess what happens then? No major consumer base from a huge chunk of the country. Maybe all of the water purification and cleanup projects that have gone on throughout Nevada should have been scrapped? I don't see the need, nobody HAS to live there. I have a beautiful aquifer below my home, and a number of nice rivers and lakes by me - not to mention an ocean. Of course, if I stayed in my vacuum, things may not be the best elsewhere. Alas, my tax dollars, and taxes paid while in NV paid for this. Good? Bad? One thing is for sure - water will be the new oil The subsidies will be paid a hundredfold if they went to anything worthwhile...
 
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9,461
Location
Not Seattle, but close.
Tempest ought to be concerned about educating people about water, given where he lives. He better also hope that those upstream don't decide they have better uses for "their" water than to sell it to Nevada. Wait until (if) anyone actually starts massive extraction of oil from the shale in Colorado, etc.
 
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