What I have learned about oil filtration by reading this forum

dwasifar

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The filter that came on the engine from the factory (made by whoever Ford contracts) would be an OES part. The "Motorcraft" branded filter, even though made by Purolator, would be an OEM part. A filter branded "Fram", "Wix", "Purolator", etc would be an aftermarket part.

I'm not sure I buy that distinction. The OE in both of those abbreviations stands for Original Equipment, and if the engine is not originally equipped with that filter, then calling it any name that includes the words Original Equipment is logically wrong.

As for the other thing, following it to its logical outcome, we'd conclude that Purolator could make two identical filters, label one Purolator and the other Motorcraft, and we'd be rigidly obliged to call one aftermarket and the other OEM. That's silly if you think about it. It's the same filter, so if it can be called one, it can be called the other.

The corporations involved may have reasons for wanting to promulgate this kind of doublespeak, but we're not obliged to go along with it when it departs from logic.
 

ZeeOSix

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Why do people always try to make up their own definitions of already established industry definitions? Even though they think they have more logic. 😄

That article clearly explains the difference between OES, OEM and Aftermarket parts. Other similar articles say the same basic thing. Read it a few times and it might become more clear.

Bonus question: When is a part both OES and OEM?
 

ZeeOSix

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As for the other thing, following it to its logical outcome, we'd conclude that Purolator could make two identical filters, label one Purolator and the other Motorcraft, and we'd be rigidly obliged to call one aftermarket and the other OEM. That's silly if you think about it. It's the same filter, so if it can be called one, it can be called the other.
But you're trying to make up your own definitions. In your example, the one branded "Motorcraft' certainly would be an OEM part, and the one branded "Purolator" would be an aftermarket part, those are the definitions per the parts industry standatds - regardless of any other "logic".

A filter maker could make 20 diffetent branded filters where they were all identical inside. If 10 of them had a car manufacturer's name on them (Motorcraft, Subaru, AC Delco, Mazda, etc), they would all be considered OEM filters. If they had some other brand on them they would be considered aftermarket parts. That's the parts industry definitions.
 

dwasifar

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Why do people always try to make up their own definitions of already established industry definitions? Even though they think they have more logic. 😄

That article clearly explains the difference between OES, OEM and Aftermarket parts. Other similar articles say the same basic thing. Read it a few times and it might become more clear.

Bonus question: When is a part both OES and OEM?
You know, it's more than a little insulting to be told "read it again," as if I was too dumb to get it the first time. I understand it perfectly; I just don't agree with it.

The manufacturers want you to regard the brand name as more important than the actual physical product. This kind of thing is kind of like realtors instructing the world to write REALTOR® in all-caps with the registered trademark symbol every time you mention them. It's good for the manufacturers because it helps build and distinguish their brands, but it's illogical for everyone else to just go along with it when it dilutes what would otherwise be a valuable distinction between aftermarket and original equipment. If you can buy a completely different filter from what the engine was originally equipped with but be obliged to call it Original Equipment, or buy a filter that is totally identical to what the engine was originally equipped with but be obliged to call it aftermarket, based solely on what is written on the can and nothing else, then something is wrong with the way we're using these words. Objecting to that doesn't make me stupid, and I would appreciate it if you would ratchet back the condescension a notch or two.
 

dwasifar

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But you're trying to make up your own definitions. In your example, the one branded "Motorcraft' certainly would be an OEM part, and the one branded "Purolator" would be an aftermarket part, those are the definitions per the parts industry standatds - regardless of any other "logic".

A filter maker could make 20 diffetent branded filters where they were all identical inside. If 10 of them had a car manufacturer's name on them (Motorcraft, Subaru, AC Delco, Mazda, etc), they would all be considered OEM filters. If they had some other brand on them they would be considered aftermarket parts. That's the parts industry definitions.
I am arguing in favor of better definitions and more precise use of language. Language is not handed down by God, let alone by manufacturers. It's malleable and changes when people decide it should change. Why tolerate self-serving imprecision?
 

ZeeOSix

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LoL, don't get all defensive - I'm not trying to twist your undies. ;) The definitions of OES, OEM and Aftermarket parts are what they are for a reason, and are based on the definitions used by the parts industy. It actually makes more sense than you think. That's why I said read that article again on their examples because I don't think you see the industry's logic. The definitions are actually pretty specific and precise.

If you don't agree and want to make up your own "definitions" then go for it, but you're not speaking technically correct about it. You can't have one same exact part be both OEM and Aftermarket, even if they are the same exact part but with only a diffefent name on them. How would you distinguish between them otherwise? If one filter was branded "Motorcraft" and one branded "Purolator" (both identical otherwise), which one is associated with Ford and consideted the OEM filter? It certainly isn't the one branded "Purolator". You don't go to a Ford dealership and ask for a Ford OEM oil filter and the parts guy brings out a filter branded as "Purolator". By your logic, they could both be sold an OEM or an Aftermarket part, but in reality they can't, even though they are identical inside and only the brand name is different. That's how the parts industry operates.
 
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I've been following this forum for a while now, and I thought I might sum up what I've learned, for the amusement and edification of all.
  • Filtration efficiency is the most important thing about a filter.
  • Flow is the most important thing about a filter.
  • Build quality is the most important thing about a filter.
  • You can tell certain filters are identical by opening them up and looking.
  • You can't be sure filters are identical by opening them up and looking.
  • Orange can Fram filters suck.
  • There is nothing wrong with Fram orange can filters.
  • Blue can Subaru filters suck.
  • Blue can Subaru filters meet factory specs and are fine.
  • Subaru bypass pressure spec is critical.
  • Subaru bypass pressure spec is irrelevant.
  • In general, the stock filter is best for your engine.
  • Stock filters are generally the minimum acceptable quality, so aftermarket is the way to go.
  • Champ ecore contributes to failure.
  • Ecore filters are just fine and improve flow.
  • Wix filters are the best choice for quality.
  • Wix filters have quality problems and will tear.
  • Purolator filters are reliable.
  • Purolator filters are not reliable and will tear.
  • Jobber filters' track record shows they are fine for modest OCIs.
  • Don't ever use jobber filters; it's taking your engine's life in your hands.
  • Cartridge filters, such as on Toyotas, are a functional regression.
  • Cartridge filters are great because you don't need to cut open a filter to inspect it.
  • Buying premium filters, even for short OCIs, is cheap insurance.
  • Buying premium filters is a waste of money for short OCIs.
And finally, of course:
  • Everything is about delta-p.
Did I miss anything? :D
Denso
 
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Everyone has their own bias and no one is going to change. Several years ago, Burger King attempted to compete with McDonald's by offering a 1/3 pound burger for less money than a McDonald's quarter pounder. It failed because most people thought a quarter pounder was larger than 1/3 pounder. This is why I don't bother trying to argue on the internet.
With a 1/4 pounder you get 4 burgers and with a 1/3 pounder you get 3 burgers ! Simple math ;)
 
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That's the cue for a series of people to tell you the Motorcraft filter meets Ford specs and is sold by Ford dealers and thus counts as OEM.

I feel like someone is missing someone else's point in that kind of discussion, but I'm not sure which is which.

Factory filter is a Champ and Motorcraft are made by Purolator, is that right? Kind of like Subaru with their Tokyo Rokis and Frams. I can see the point that whatever the manufacturer sells and recommends is technically OEM, but on the other hand, if the factory filter isn't a Puro and the Motorcraft is, then functionally how is it not aftermarket? Seems like one of those discussions that get college freshmen all knotted up in philosophy classes.
Motorcraft is a LICENSED Ford product, I’m sure Mann gives Ford a few pennies from the sale of each filter, although the base end bypass is a Ford requirement (that is disappearing from the FL400S, apparently). I guess AC Delco is kind of the same deal, GM isn’t making filters, Champ is, and paying GM to approve them, and for the name. I just always thought it was hilarious that Ford used WIx or Champ at the engine factory-if MC was so “good”, then why not use a blank or specially labeled one on the line?
 
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I've been following this forum for a while now, and I thought I might sum up what I've learned, for the amusement and edification of all.
  • Filtration efficiency is the most important thing about a filter.
  • Flow is the most important thing about a filter.
  • Build quality is the most important thing about a filter.
  • You can tell certain filters are identical by opening them up and looking.
  • You can't be sure filters are identical by opening them up and looking.
  • Orange can Fram filters suck.
  • There is nothing wrong with Fram orange can filters.
  • Blue can Subaru filters suck.
  • Blue can Subaru filters meet factory specs and are fine.
  • Subaru bypass pressure spec is critical.
  • Subaru bypass pressure spec is irrelevant.
  • In general, the stock filter is best for your engine.
  • Stock filters are generally the minimum acceptable quality, so aftermarket is the way to go.
  • Champ ecore contributes to failure.
  • Ecore filters are just fine and improve flow.
  • Wix filters are the best choice for quality.
  • Wix filters have quality problems and will tear.
  • Purolator filters are reliable.
  • Purolator filters are not reliable and will tear.
  • Jobber filters' track record shows they are fine for modest OCIs.
  • Don't ever use jobber filters; it's taking your engine's life in your hands.
  • Cartridge filters, such as on Toyotas, are a functional regression.
  • Cartridge filters are great because you don't need to cut open a filter to inspect it.
  • Buying premium filters, even for short OCIs, is cheap insurance.
  • Buying premium filters is a waste of money for short OCIs.
And finally, of course:
  • Everything is about delta-p.
Did I miss anything? :D

Bypass pressure is simply Delta pressure. So what’s going out can’t be different than coming in. If so then it can’t surpass the bypass other wise it opens.
People claim that at start up the bypass opens. I’d like to see these claims as many manufacturers don’t even have a bypass. My Hyundai Elantra. While my Subaru does. Where this is a factor would be in winter at freezing temps. Due to thickening that pressure differential might be met.
Subaru filters are trash with paper end caps. They are the bare minimum. If that’s fine for you then ok good point. But at the price for bare minimum where a few off shelf are constructed better and equal to bypass pressure. It turns now into the fact of being a fanboy versus being obvious of the situation. WIX 57712/57712XP Puralator and N3R filters surpass the FRAM Subaru blue.
If there was a shortage on the others that’s the only time I’d use FRAM anything.
Sorry I can’t fathom paying current prices for 20 year old tech. Makes zero sense.
 

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