Things getting real now

Kestas

Staff member
Joined
Jun 4, 2002
Messages
14,218
Location
The Motor City
I once worked at a private lab where business slowed down. I was relegated to 4 days a week, and the day off couldn't be a Monday or Friday for some silly reason. This was accompanied with 78% of pay, using some pizza logic, and against the guidelines by the state of Michigan. I spent the days off looking for work elsewhere, and found it.
 

53' Stude

Thread starter
Joined
Mar 12, 2015
Messages
23,055
Location
In the shop
Talked to brother last night. He successfully applied for unemployment. Applied at my workplace also; so was nice seeing that. His family is in Virginia Beach VA on vacation til next Sunday
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2011
Messages
2,796
Location
California's Central Coast Wine Country
Although I agree in principle with the many comments about reinventing one's self, it's easier said than done. And often times it requires moving.

I was a systems engineer for 25 years for a Fortune 100 company in Silicon Valley. Simply reinventing yourself on a new technology within the company was a difficult thing to do.

In my business we had the high tech job hopper types with no loyalty to anyone other than themselves. They'd get hired and finally learn their jobs, only to leave the company to pursue some other new technology. The result was a broad based, but mediocre skill set. These job hoppers never mastered anything. In my experience job hoppers were never assigned complicated, critical work - because they weren't skilled enough to take on the task. They may have known how the technology "worked when it was working", but they didn't know squat when it didn't work because of some hardware failure, software bug, or configuration issue.

And to think the likes of factory workers at, say, the AC Delco spark plug plant in Detroit were a bunch of untrainable, dead enders who should have reinvented themselves is blatantly unfair. Those people showed up every day and did the job they were told to do. Their reward? Poverty.

Scott
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 27, 2022
Messages
224
Although I agree in principle with the many comments about reinventing one's self, it's easier said than done. And often times it requires moving.

I was a systems engineer for 25 years for a Fortune 100 company in Silicon Valley. Simply reinventing yourself on a new technology within the company was a difficult thing to do.

To think the likes of factory workers at, say, the AC Delco spark plug plant in Detroit were a bunch of untrainable, dead enders is blatantly unfair. Those people showed up every day and did the job they were told to do.

Scott
especially true if nearing retirement age. I have no interest in moving (and going through the effort and expense of moving to a new job does NOT guarantee the success or duration of the new job, the new job is always 'at risk' as well.) Also, there is substantial age discrimination in the workplace, no amount of reinventing oneself can fix that!
 
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