The cost of living in 2024....

I didn't read all the replies but one of the biggest issues I see with your daughter is where she's living. The pay she's receiving is not very good.

My wife made big bucks as an RN in one of the cities in the greater San Francisco Bay Area region. She retired 4 years ago and was making $97/hr plus benefits. Wages have increased significantly since then. Our daugher-in-law, also an RN just took a new full-time RN position that pays her $217k per year.

Have your daughter find a nice boyfriend with a good education and high income earning potential and move with her to a big city somewhere so they can get themselves started.

Scott

My daughter will be working in what many call the Medical Mecca of the United States. No, it's not Rochester MN or Johns Hopkins, but another area where the medical research and provisions are greater IMO and many others, mainly the doctors, nurses, RTs, PT, OTs and others who work in this area. The pay is not what this area is known for, it's the treatments, and decades of reputation for saving lives, transplants, trauma service and orthopaedics.

In fact, my daughter's life was saved at the adjoining hospital where she will be working. She spent 180 days in the hospital in 2021, about 4 months on a ventilator herself, 4+ months on dialysis, had 25+ blood transfusions, several cocktails of chemo-type infusions to weaken her immune system to combat 5+ months of undiagnosed auto-immune diseases. The missed diagnoses were most likely due to the blinders everyone seemed to have on because of the chinese virus warfare in 2020-2021. Anyway.... she was able to leave the hospital around Veterans Day 2021, was doing Crossfit in May 2022, doing some baby-sitting jobs during that time through the summer and started back to college in August 2022. Since August 2022, she's working a part-time job, done 1-2 days a week of hospital clinicals (drive 50-90 minutes one-way to a hospital at 5 am, work 12+ hours at the hospital, drive back), go to class a couple days a week, study and find time to rest.

She will be working at the facility where she wants to work. She knows she has to put in the first year, get more certificates and try to move into the higher-paying positions that she wants. She says she wants to be in NICU. I think everyone should be grateful that there's people out there that have the desire to want to do these things. I can't imagine what kind of mindset it takes to be able to skillfully treat sick babies and do it for a living.


Let me let many of you in on a secret - nobody that grew up in the South or most anywhere else wants to move up north, especially to NYC, anywhere in MA, DC, CT, NJ, DE, IL or anywhere in CA, especially the Bay Area. We see and hear what's there. And I know, most of the people that want to and do live in those areas don't and generally can't live where I do - where there's no street lights.
 
At least she's not looking for one of the Hollywood wannabe's or starving artists that have relocated from up north!

Those are pretty easy to find all around our town - all you gotta do is look on the FB Neighborhood groups for someone who doesn't have a truck or doesn't know how to do anything.... oh wait.... that's most of the population today, right? :ROFLMAO:
 
Those are pretty easy to find all around our town - all you gotta do is look on the FB Neighborhood groups for someone who doesn't have a truck or doesn't know how to do anything.... oh wait.... that's most of the population today, right? :ROFLMAO:
Lol, it is becoming more common. Every time I have to go to Fayetteville or Newnan, the Hollywood wannabe vibe is strong.
 
All told, about $130k total for her degree. She has accepted a position at a local Children's Hospital. She will work one month on day shift and then work night shift from then on. Base rate of pay for day shift is $22.66/hour and there is a $5/hour differential for night shift, where she will make $27.66.
Good on you to help your daughter.

Maybe an issue is living in the city, I get the desire to not drive, but beggars can’t be choosers comes to mind. Not to sound coarse, I apologize, but the budget should balance. I wouldn’t want my kid to be subject to lousy or unsafe situations either. But something doesn’t add up… How do the other new hires handle it?

The question that comes to mind is was it known up front what the pay is? DOL provide books with pay statistics. $22/hr is like $44k/yr. If that was looked up, and thought about as part of the decision process, then I’m not sure this is much of a surprise. That amount of money, especially living in a city, was not a big amount of money to make ends meet a decade ago, long before pandemics, economy booms, and inflation.

Regarding the issue with nurses… they’re all making $70k+ in early career and new start around here. And it’s easy to make a good deal more.
 
Let me let many of you in on a secret - nobody that grew up in the South or most anywhere else wants to move up north, especially to NYC, anywhere in MA, DC, CT, NJ, DE, IL or anywhere in CA, especially the Bay Area. We see and hear what's there. And I know, most of the people that want to and do live in those areas don't and generally can't live where I do - where there's no street lights.
I currently have an assistant who grew up in Alabama. She and her husband moved to MA for work and the plan was always to go back home. She was with us for a few years and then moved back down south. Roughly 8 months later I got a phone call from her asking for her job back. They moved back home and both found jobs, but I guess MA grew on both of them, and their standard of living was higher here even though the cost of living is higher. They moved back and have been here since. We kid with her because she says "Y'all" and it's very endearing and she jokes with us that we're not all that bad for "northerners".

I have many family members who live in NC and SC having moved from CT about 30 years ago and they love it. I've visited them many times and I'd have no problems living where they live. I'm in MA because I grew up in NY/CT and my family and my wife's family are here and it's more about that than a comment about living in the NE is somehow superior to living in the South or out West. I still like the change of seasons, the "honesty" of the people (even if they're saying something that isn't nice), and the global acceptance of people here, but I could live in lots of places just fine. I don't know if I'd be accepted everywhere, but it would probably just depend on the place.
 
Many great posts above! I won't repeat the wise words.

It is imperative that today's employees keep searching for adequate pay, be willing to relocate, and know how to avoid bad locations. Improves the chances of long term success.
I agree on searching for adequate pay. Relocation and running away only works so far. The costs of many items don’t change between high and low cost of living areas.

Thus the question - how are the other new hires swinging it? Is valid. Somehow people are doing the work… or the place is short staffed.

Assuming the city in question is Atlanta (based upon OP’s location), that’s supposed to be boom town central.

Due diligence is a requirement for all.
 
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Let me let many of you in on a secret - nobody that grew up in the South or most anywhere else wants to move up north, especially to NYC, anywhere in MA, DC, CT, NJ, DE, IL or anywhere in CA, especially the Bay Area. We see and hear what's there. And I know, most of the people that want to and do live in those areas don't and generally can't live where I do - where there's no street lights.
I can't say that I disagree with you. Being a Cali native I agree with your comments about NYC and the other eastern states. With respect to California there are indeed areas that have morphed into something I no longer recognize and wouldn't choose to live there.

That said, if you know the area you can work at hospitals in the cities yet still have a home in what I'd consider a nice area. Like @JeffKeryk, I spent nearly all of my youth and adulthood in Los Gatos until my mid-50s. Even today, I think Los Gatos is one of the finest communities in the entire country. Los Gatos is $$$$$ but there are much more affordable communities nearby, Boulder Creek and Felton being two that come to mind.

Unlike what many people think California is not packed shoulder-to-shoulder with people. We live in a very nice wine country area near the coast. We don't have sidewalks or street lights. We have deer wandering up and down our street on a daily basis. We have nearby packs coyotes howling at night. We've even had recent mountain lion sightings within a quarter mile of our home :oops:.

You are proud of your daughter and rightfully so. I admire you for raising her "right" and paying for her college education - and for a worthwhile degree. Props to you and your entire family!

My main point is that people spend a lot of money on college educations. Why not cash in on them?

That said, I will be the first to admit that with respect to my career it was all about the money. Had I not been paid as handsomely as I was I wouldn't have stayed in that line of work.

Please don't interpret any of my comments or suggestions as me throwing stones at you. You and your family are doing all the right things. Congrats!

Scott
 
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Good on you to help your daughter.

Maybe an issue is living in the city, I get the desire to not drive, but beggars can’t be choosers comes to mind. Not to sound coarse, I apologize, but the budget should balance. I wouldn’t want my kid to be subject to lousy or unsafe situations either. But something doesn’t add up… How do the other new hires handle it?

The question that comes to mind is was it known up front what the pay is? DOL provide books with pay statistics. $22/hr is like $44k/yr. If that was looked up, and thought about as part of the decision process, then I’m not sure this is much of a surprise. That amount of money, especially living in a city, was not a big amount of money to make ends meet a decade ago, long before pandemics, economy booms, and inflation.

Regarding the issue with nurses… they’re all making $70k+ in early career and new start around here. And it’s easy to make a good deal more.

1. Thank you.

2. I'd say a lot of new hires have help from their parents as well. I know a very, very similar situation from 3 years ago - my former employer (and best friend) - he and his wife helped his stepdaughter pay her living expenses the first 12-18 months out of college, with Bachelor in Nursing and RN, who went to work at the same hospital my daughter will be working at. I think they started her out at about $25/hour ~3 years ago. She's still employed there, finishing up her NP degree/residency/schooling. In fact, my daughter worked with her one day a month ago while doing clinicals there.


Let me address the housing / commute issue - Many of you think a 30-45-60 minute commute is "nothing" and while I can relate, it much more bearable if you're doing that while sleeping your normal sleep pattern overnight, going to your lame desk job and scrolling in between hearty spreadsheet sessions and Teams Calls, it's not "nothing" to a typical hospital worker who has to clock in at 6:45 am or pm, clock out at 7:15 am or pm, then "commute" for 30-45-60 minutes, eat something unwind (remember these people have a slightly more stressful job than driving spreadsheets at a desk between sports talk sessions), try to get to sleep, then wake up at 4:15-4:30 am / pm, get ready, do that "nothing" commute and do it all over again for 13-14 hours.

These new hires where my daughter will be working have to work 3 consecutive days per week. That's the minimum. They can work PRN (as needed) one or two more days per week. If you can't admit that doing this 3 consecutive days per week, driving 90-120 minutes per day isn't rough, try it.




I didn't start this thread as a whine fest or anything else other than I guess me unloading what was in my brain after the shock I received about the pay rate for these people. All of you commenting about researching the pay rate before spending the money on college, let me say this - when my daughter entered the RT program, it was on the tail end of Covid and all I heard the previous 30 months or so was that the medical industry was paying nurses and RTs a minimum of $50/hour. Yes, I know some of that was subsidized but I figured after the subsidies ran out, the pay would have to increase from the former base rates to keep these people.... None of you have a magic 8 ball and none of you would have thought anything different that what I did. You aren't that good at predicting the future, otherwise you wouldn't be typing here, you'd be on a island somewhere being waited on hand and foot....
 
Good to hear your daughter recovered and very healthy. (y)

She’ll do very good in her career.
Don’t worry about the money spent for her education, it’s a good investment in the long run.
 
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Hillbilly Deluxe,

Do you think she might want to be a RT traveler in a few years and see the country ?
Work a few weeks in various parts of the country.

If I was younger and my employer had this option I’d definitely do it to see the USA, different people, different foods, cultures, unique experiences, sightseeing, etc….
I would really love to see the PNW, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Oregon, Alaska, etc… for a few weeks and move onto the next assignment.
 
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I didn't start this thread as a whine fest or anything else other than I guess me unloading what was in my brain after the shock I received about the pay rate for these people. All of you commenting about researching the pay rate before spending the money on college, let me say this - when my daughter entered the RT program, it was on the tail end of Covid and all I heard the previous 30 months or so was that the medical industry was paying nurses and RTs a minimum of $50/hour. Yes, I know some of that was subsidized but I figured after the subsidies ran out, the pay would have to increase from the former base rates to keep these people.... None of you have a magic 8 ball and none of you would have thought anything different that what I did. You aren't that good at predicting the future, otherwise you wouldn't be typing here, you'd be on a island somewhere being waited on hand and foot....
Speaking for myself, and I'm sure several others, I find no fault in anything you, your daughter, or your family has done. I understand your angst about the current pay for that work, but that your daughter's education will pay off in the long run. Absolutely zero doubt in my mind. Assuming she works in her area of specialty, she'll be put into situations that will benefit her by providing leads and opportunities. I assume that she will marry one day. That will change everything living expense-wise.

Scott
 
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My daughter will be working in what many call the Medical Mecca of the United States. No, it's not Rochester MN or Johns Hopkins, but another area where the medical research and provisions are greater IMO and many others, mainly the doctors, nurses, RTs, PT, OTs and others who work in this area. The pay is not what this area is known for, it's the treatments, and decades of reputation for saving lives, transplants, trauma service and orthopaedics.

In fact, my daughter's life was saved at the adjoining hospital where she will be working. She spent 180 days in the hospital in 2021, about 4 months on a ventilator herself, 4+ months on dialysis, had 25+ blood transfusions, several cocktails of chemo-type infusions to weaken her immune system to combat 5+ months of undiagnosed auto-immune diseases. The missed diagnoses were most likely due to the blinders everyone seemed to have on because of the chinese virus warfare in 2020-2021. Anyway.... she was able to leave the hospital around Veterans Day 2021, was doing Crossfit in May 2022, doing some baby-sitting jobs during that time through the summer and started back to college in August 2022. Since August 2022, she's working a part-time job, done 1-2 days a week of hospital clinicals (drive 50-90 minutes one-way to a hospital at 5 am, work 12+ hours at the hospital, drive back), go to class a couple days a week, study and find time to rest.

She will be working at the facility where she wants to work. She knows she has to put in the first year, get more certificates and try to move into the higher-paying positions that she wants. She says she wants to be in NICU. I think everyone should be grateful that there's people out there that have the desire to want to do these things. I can't imagine what kind of mindset it takes to be able to skillfully treat sick babies and do it for a living.


Let me let many of you in on a secret - nobody that grew up in the South or most anywhere else wants to move up north, especially to NYC, anywhere in MA, DC, CT, NJ, DE, IL or anywhere in CA, especially the Bay Area. We see and hear what's there. And I know, most of the people that want to and do live in those areas don't and generally can't live where I do - where there's no street lights.


Thank God your daughter pulled through and recovered, now very healthy and very motivated. 🙏


After about 1 year of RT experience at hospital….. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND she attend the daily morning huddle with hospital administration, all the executives and department directors / hospital leadership. These are mandatory morning meetings to discuss the on going happenings at hospital.

She will be with her Director and see exactly how things are done behind the scenes, issues at her hospital, important metrics, quality and compliance, corporate decisions, how problems get resolved, etc…

Trust me on this, she wants all the folks in the room to know that she can be counted on if her Director or manager is away on PTO, vacation or at important meeting at corporate division. Even if she can’t make it to the meeting she can attend online by WebEx type of meeting software.

At these huddles you have to be on your game because hospital CEO, COO, CNO, CFO, all department directors are there and they will NOT hesitate to call someone out if they are slacking or not taking care of business. Once they meet your daughter and have confidence in her abilities they will definitely look at her differently than just an RT.

When I was working as a Biomed Technician (repair, test, calibrate and PM medical equipment) I was attending these daily morning huddles and was the go to person for anything related to Biomed. At a 400 bed hospital we had approx 7000 pieces of equipment (no joke 7000, not 700) so I was in the Hot Seat when there were any issues. Some issues were very small, other issues were major and needed immediate attention.

She definitely has to take advantage of tuition reimbursement at her hospital and continue building her career.
 
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