Spicing up my chili

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racer12306

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Originally Posted By: tinmanSC
Tabasco, habanero peppers, and CUMIN IS A MUST! Cumin in such a great flavor for chili. You should be able to smell that there is cumin somewhere in there upon opening the lid when cooking. I'd also use more onion, and several colors of peppers, not just green. If nothing else, it adds color and a slightly sweet flavor to some bites. How long do you cook this chili? Mine cooks in a crock pot or roaster for 18 hours. I always use canned beans washed, about 1/2 of the beans rupture during such long cooking and you end up with a very thick chili. Tasty!
I'm definitely going with cumin, I like the idea of whole seeds that was mentioned later. Just trying to figure out how much I actually need. Generally it's a few hours for cooking in my big 16qt.
Originally Posted By: Rolla07
Turkey is a great alternative to beef. I do love ground beef, but find turkey is a great substitute if you are trying to reduce red meat intake. They also sell sodium free canned beans, that is typically what I go with but bagged beans are likely the most inexpensive option as Bluestream mentioned. Maybe a little liquid smoke? Depends on what you like tastewise. You can try some red pepper flakes or cayenne for more heat, and maybe other herbs and spices to mix things up a bit. I tend to toss in Oregano, onion/garlic salt, a couple dabs of bbq sauce etc.. I randomly decide on things to toss in, depending on what I have or what I feel like trying. Recipe looks good though!! Nothing better than hot soups and chili on these colder days.
I like the liquid smoke idea. Definitely going to write that down for next year. I think I'm trying enough new stuff in it this year. We'll see how it turns out. Maybe if it's good enough, I'll make my next batch sooner than next year.
Originally Posted By: bubbatime
Oh, and the one trick I've learned over the years is that chili tastes better on the second day after it sits over night and soaks in all the flavors. So if you need it on Friday, make it on Thursday.
I agree completely. I think this year I'm going to cook everything on Saturday, then put it in the fridge overnight and then freeze it the next day to help everything marinate together.
Originally Posted By: NormanBuntz
Using some Ancho chili powder complements the regular chili powder.
I'll have to see what the store has.
Originally Posted By: Bud
You have to make stuff the way you and your family like it. My wife and I both like chili with beans and we use pinto beans. Being from Texas does not mean I want it so hot tears are running down my face, although I have had it that way. We like it medium spicy and use cayenne for heat. In my younger days I would have a hot sauce called Mean Green Iguana with habanero chips. Only problem with that was having to blow your nose every 5 minutes and the pain the next day. But I do have to have only beef in my chili.
My wife and I like hot, but not burn your face off hot. I'm still creeping up on the heat as I don't want to ruin a huge batch because it's too hot.
Originally Posted By: Tom NJ
I agree cumin is a must in chili. I suggest using whole cumin seeds rather than ground cumin as the seeds will give bursts of cumin flavor. Also oregano is more commonly used than basil. No salt in your recipe?? Tom NJ
Not a big salt person. There is some salt that comes from the canned beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes if I don't get the no salt added versions.
Originally Posted By: Bluestream
I've been using sausage in my chili lately instead of beef. I like to serve it with grated cheddar and chopped green onions...
I've thought about chorizo, maybe next time I do a beef/pork batch.
Originally Posted By: montero1
Looks good to have on hand for any occasion.
 
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roasting jalapenos is really easy. coat with oil and salt and pepper, and grill them on high (or roast in a hot oven, like 450F) until outside is blackened. place in a small bowl and cover tightly with saran wrap. after they cool down(half hour) you will be able to easily peel the skin off, and remove the stem and seeds. the flesh of the pepper will now be much hotter than when raw, because the oils have been cooked into it. honestly i would vote like other have said for a can of chipoltes in adobo. they add a nice flavor. use them SPARINGLY. they are hot. remember you can always add more of something, but once you add too much, you're screwed! i personally don't care much for franks red hot, or tabasco, or liquid smoke. if i want smoked flavor, then i smoke something. i save the franks red hot for wings. tabasco is too vinegary for my tastes. for chili the peppers will give you all the heat you need. i also use cumin in chili. cumin goes very well with many bean receipes.
 
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another vote for siracha too! i don't use it in chili, but i do always have on in a fridge, when i want to kick something up, that's my go to sauce.
 
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Originally Posted By: Bluestream
I've been using sausage in my chili lately instead of beef.
MMMM!! I've got to try that next!
 
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Originally Posted By: montero1
I discovered this sauce personally in 1996 at a pho place. So, I thought for years it was an imported Vietnamese condiment. It was invented and is made in California. It's since gone totally mainstream. When they sell it in Wal Mart that's a sure sign.
 

racer12306

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This is definitely the best chili I've made yet. Split the chili powder and the ground chipotle chili peppers. Went with two chipotle chili's with adobo and two jalapenos with their ribs. Made a puree of the chilis and jalapenos. Not sure if the chocolate did anything for it but it is flavorful and has enough bite to notice but not hurt.
 
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IMHO, your recipe is too unbalanced, waaaayyy to many beans, not near enough spice & herbs, which results in your description of it being "bland". Turkey chili is a lot like chicken fajitas......an oxymoron. Not wishing to offend or be rude just MHO. I'd typed up a list, then went back to check a comment, then my reply disappeared! WTH? So this reply is much shorter. Chili should have a profound deep, rich, spicy, earthy, beefy tasting foundation. If you don't have that to begin with, adding bits of things for kick won't work: You need a good, solid foundation & walls before you pick wallpaper. Good luck.....
 
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Originally Posted By: racer12306
What kind of or quantity of spices and herbs am I missing?
Not sure you're referring to me or not as I didn't see my tag in the re: field. Chili is a meat-based sauce and gets it's flavor from beef or venison or pork or all three, plus chilis, onion, garlic, tomatoes, spices and masa. Turkey doesn't have much flavor at all to start with compared to the above three. These big spices will completely overwhelm it, whereas the three meats listed above can stand up to it. Beer, beef and onions are a great combination. If you sub in turkey, it's odd and doesn't work. One turkey isn't a red meat like the other three. That's a HUGE difference...too different to overcome actually.
 

racer12306

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Originally Posted By: cjcride
For that size put 4 heaping tablespoons of Cumin. Switch the Jalapeno peppers to Bonnet peppers, about 8 to 10(they are Hot)
I went with four tablespoons and a little more. I'm pretty happy with the heat right now. It warmed up nicely in the fridge overnight.
Originally Posted By: sleddriver
Originally Posted By: racer12306
What kind of or quantity of spices and herbs am I missing?
Not sure you're referring to me or not as I didn't see my tag in the re: field. Chili is a meat-based sauce and gets it's flavor from beef or venison or pork or all three, plus chilis, onion, garlic, tomatoes, spices and masa. Turkey doesn't have much flavor at all to start with compared to the above three. These big spices will completely overwhelm it, whereas the three meats listed above can stand up to it. Beer, beef and onions are a great combination. If you sub in turkey, it's odd and doesn't work. One turkey isn't a red meat like the other three. That's a HUGE difference...too different to overcome actually.
I understand your point of view. Right now I'm pretty happy with the turkey in it. I bet this would be great with beef.
 
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Originally Posted By: racer12306
What kind of or quantity of spices and herbs am I missing?
Something like the Frontier organic chili blend Organic chili powder Organic cumin Organic oregano Organic coriander Organic garlic Organic allspice Organic cloves I buy the blend ready made easier than buying indivisual spices. Also I add 2 Tbl Peru Cacao powder spices are very alkaline and have high ORAC http://modernsurvivalblog.com/health/high-orac-value-antioxidant-foods-top-100/. For water I make a strong Organic olive leaf tea mixture. I've made veggie chili with no meat so the spices gives good flavor.
 
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Originally Posted By: DBMaster
I used to work in the supplement industry - for twelve years. The value of antioxidants has been debated. Harvard Science Based Medicine Daily Mail
OK it's debatable was waiting for that BUT I'll still say herbs are alkaline forming and if you look at different geographic cuisines Asian, European, Mediterranian and America herbs added in seafood or animal meat(acidic) there is a very similar trait to balance the acidicty and alkalinity. Herbs tend to have a strong alkaline forming result, when steaming fish I add herbs it gives good flavor but also very alkaline forming. Like wise in chili, stews and soups herbs are added to give flavor and to offset acidity.
 
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If I grilled a steak with sea salt and pepper taking couple of TBL of bee pollen would off set the acidity of the meal. I eat good quality bee pollen especially after a meal high in acidity a good practice.
 
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Originally Posted By: Mamala Bay
Originally Posted By: DBMaster
I used to work in the supplement industry - for twelve years. The value of antioxidants has been debated. Harvard Science Based Medicine Daily Mail
OK it's debatable was waiting for that BUT I'll still say herbs are alkaline forming and if you look at different geographic cuisines Asian, European, Mediterranian and America herbs added in seafood or animal meat(acidic) there is a very similar trait to balance the acidicty and alkalinity. Herbs tend to have a strong alkaline forming result, when steaming fish I add herbs it gives good flavor but also very alkaline forming. Like wise in chili, stews and soups herbs are added to give flavor and to offset acidity.
Don't get me wrong, I love using spices and herbs in my preparations. Plus, I do take a daily multi and Vitamin D3 supplement. I try not to get carried away. In the U.S. we always tend to think that if a little is good, a lot is better, and a BOATLOAD is even better than that. The company I worked for purchased a machine for testing ORAC values of various ingredients. In the mid to late 2000's you could sell products based upon ORAC scores alone.
 
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I typically use a 1/2 ratio of cumin and cocoa powder to chili powder. With regard to imparting a slight smoke flavor you have options liquid smoke, smoked paprika,finely chopped bacon or chipotle.
 
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