Photo: Sept 15th 1911 - How did people cope with heat?

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The storefront of a grocery store in Bath, Maine photographed by Jack Delano in December 1940.

Credit: sebcolorisation on Instagram
historycolored.com

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The storefront of a grocery store in Bath, Maine photographed by Jack Delano in December 1940.

Credit: sebcolorisation on Instagram
historycolored.com

View attachment 121050

Hmmm………

I know what lamb chops, pork loin, and hams are, butt (sic) I believe I’ll forego asking what a “face rump” is………..

However, I will ask “what oil do you think is the crankcase of those two rides?”
 
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thnx buster.
Remastered is go0d, colors? I cant say but the sound? probably not close. In some ways much quieter (less car/truck/buss) but plenty hawkers (newspapers, produce, tin knockers, etc; barkers for story entry re: milinary, 'sales', etc).

Notced: a hat for every head ('60s killed that here), knickers (mostly children, but some men), no J walking laws (came in due to increased traffic?) & incivlity/fast pace of life; race difference; slower pace walking (even tho city); lack of 'haze' (industrial output, ICE transportation); ambulation difficultis (improved health care/prosthetic avaailability - C 3rd world today). Nice to see the mix-in w/children.
 
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Our old house built in 1913 in Wolseley area of Winnipeg had a room over the attached garage that had three sides with windows. That room was a summer only room as it was always freezing cold in winter and we were too cheap to heat it as we didn't need the space. Never thought about it but it was a nice room in the summer with a lot of air moving through it.
Our house was in River Heights. We had a room over our attached garage too, universally called the "maid's room".

Having household help during the era these houses were built was quite common. In fact two of my aunts (both born in the 1890s) "worked out" as maids or household cooks when they were young women. It seems that was a way to make a little money, get away from rural life and have a bit of adventure.

It sounds like your "over the garage room" may have had a dual purpose. The "sleeping porch" in our house only had access through the master bedroom. Our house had a 2 story bump out with a sitting room below that we used as a TV room, and the "sleeping porch" above.
 

GON

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The storefront of a grocery store in Bath, Maine photographed by Jack Delano in December 1940.

Credit: sebcolorisation on Instagram
historycolored.com

View attachment 121050
Buster,
Thanks for posting the picture! Another picture I could study for hours. How dirty the cars are, Womens' shoe colors match their coats, .25 oysters- wish I could read the Christmas dinner list better. That XMAS was substituted for Christmas even in 1940. Lamb appears popular in 1940. What fruits/ vegetables are displayed in the window. And the women don't look to happy......
 
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Noticed: .... no J walking laws (came in due to increased traffic?) .... Nice to see the mix-in w/children.
I recently saw a video related to your comment on j-walking. Not all that long ago streets were primarily for pedestrians. When there was a conflict, vehicles had to yield the right of way to the pedestrian. Convincing walkers to stay out of the streets to make room for motor traffic was a whole new concept and took some effort.

When I was growing up (in the 1950s), children were left pretty much on their own. We had to show up for meals and at bedtime but otherwise we moved about on our own and entertained ourselves. And I don't think we suffered as a result either.
 

4WD

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Saw an economist working through on legacy media (which was a surprise) that the "average lifespan" and "average years of retirement" was a scam...surviving childhood and indeed childbirth and you get your number that hasn't changed markedly.

Go to an old cemetary, and there are so many under 5s, and women 16 to 25...then nearly everyone gets old bar an accident.

Walking to dinner in Aberdeen and just randomly walked up to this marker …

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Lifespan was just shorter
*LOL*
Heat is heat, cold is cold, and todays snowflakes are snowflakes.
Back then you were happy to wear a suit, meant you had a job, could support a family and a roof over their heads.
No one else (other taxpayers) will support you and they didnt complain about every little thing that they could not control.
They enjoyed life and were proud of what they had while they were living.
Average lifespan was significantly shorter and if you were not wealthy you did not have access to comfort, healthcare , living conditions nor work that allowed for longer life.

You sure everyone enjoyed life?
 
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The Egyptians hung wet blankets in windows to act as an evaporative cooler. I assume people in hot places did the same.

I often see our police officers loaded up with bullet proof vests,guns,batons etc and wonder how they can deal with the heat with all that on and still manage to run down a bad guy
 
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I think in 1911 human body odor was absolutely horrid at best.

The modern equivalent I see are construction workers or soldiers wearing full gear in absolute hot conditions. I guess fabric is better now.
 
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This was near 20th & Lehigh Avenue in North Philadelphia. In that 1913 World Series, the Philadelphia Athletics beat the New York Giants 4 games to 1.
 
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I grew up without AC in my house. Only my parents bedroom had an AC window unit. We dealt with it because we didn’t know any different. Back before cell phones I never missed them because they didn’t exist.
 
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My bride and I love the heat! We visit Florida in July/August and will spend all day outside. We can even do moderate work in that heat.

Now where I draw the line is going to sleep in the heat...if I'm in a mesh hammock under a tree with a breeze, maybe good for a nap...if I'm in a stuffy room in a bed, no freakin way. I need AC for a good night sleep.
 
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