Long range shooting'

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Carlos Hathcock was the most famous U.S. sniper during Vietnam. He shot at the reflection of the VC sniper's scope and his shot went through the scope's lens into the snipers eye.


I was going from memory...

I actually had his last name in my head. Just wasn't sure about his first name.

That was an amazing encounter that he had and the position of both and the change in the sun angle made the difference.
 
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I was going from memory...

I actually had his last name in my head. Just wasn't sure about his first name.

That was an amazing encounter that he had and the position of both and the change in the sun angle made the difference.
If you find his story’s interesting someone wrote a book about his missions with his help. It’s called “Marine Sniper”. I highly recommend it. Then if you like that one they did anther book with the story’s they cropped from the first one, can’t recall the name of that one.
 
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Carlos Hathcock was the most famous U.S. sniper during Vietnam. He shot at the reflection of the VC sniper's scope and his shot went through the scope's lens into the snipers eye.
A few of his "works" were replicated in the movie "Sniper" with Tom Berenger and Billy Zane.
 
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You still have to deal with temperature and altitude at longer distances. Every 1,000 ft in altitude change will affect the impact of the bullet by one inch at 1,000 yards. Same applies with temperature every 10 degree increase or decrease will also change the impact point by one inch at 1,000 yards. You zero your rifle at Sea Level and at 60 degrees. You then go hunting in the Rockies at 5,000 feet and it's 30 degrees out you will have to adjust for the change. Your taking a shot at 500 yards so the bullet due to the altitude will hit 2.5 inches high, with the temperature change the bullet will hit 1.5 inch low. So the bullet will hit 1.0 inch high at 500 yards.
 

wpod

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You still have to deal with temperature and altitude at longer distances. Every 1,000 ft in altitude change will affect the impact of the bullet by one inch at 1,000 yards. Same applies with temperature every 10 degree increase or decrease will also change the impact point by one inch at 1,000 yards. You zero your rifle at Sea Level and at 60 degrees. You then go hunting in the Rockies at 5,000 feet and it's 30 degrees out you will have to adjust for the change. Your taking a shot at 500 yards so the bullet due to the altitude will hit 2.5 inches high, with the temperature change the bullet will hit 1.5 inch low. So the bullet will hit 1.0 inch high at 500 yards.
I kinda know almost all that needs to be done, but I don't how to and never have done it. !
 
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@wpod See my post from Oct 11. It's in the book Precision Shooting at 1,000 yards. Also goes into the rotation of the earth affect on the bullet as well as the direction your shooting. What direction counter to the earths rotation NESW are you shooting. As well as shooting above or below the equator and bullet spin affecting the trajectory.
 
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Yep the Coriolis effect is a big factor in long range shooting...

I was surprised and yet not surprised that would be a factor in long shots.
 
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The Parma Idaho gun club has some long distance shooting targets. My real purpose shooting these days is to see if I can wear out my Springfield XD Tactical in 40 S&W. There were 2 guys shooting at the 700 yard and 750 yard targets so in my usual uncouth way I approached them and asked if I could watch them shooting. It is amazing to hear the muzzle blast the count the seconds before you hear the ding from the bullet hitting the metal! .We chatted for a while and the guys asked me if I wanted to try the rifles. I have never shot over 300 yards and I rarely shoot a rifle . Hesitantly I agreed to try their rifles. I dry fired a few times to test the trigger pull and asked the dumb question if the scopes were dialed in for the range and yes they were. 5 Shots and 5 hits at the point of aim with the guys coaching me . Yes , the guys did the brain work but was good for me to make the hits at that distance.
That range has really developed well!

Most of the steel on the range came from my wife's family's business "Parma Company".
 
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