Long range shooting'

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The Parma Idaho gun club has some long distance shooting targets. My real purpose shooting these days is to see if I can wear out my Springfield XD Tactical in 40 S&W. There were 2 guys shooting at the 700 yard and 750 yard targets so in my usual uncouth way I approached them and asked if I could watch them shooting. It is amazing to hear the muzzle blast the count the seconds before you hear the ding from the bullet hitting the metal! .We chatted for a while and the guys asked me if I wanted to try the rifles. I have never shot over 300 yards and I rarely shoot a rifle . Hesitantly I agreed to try their rifles. I dry fired a few times to test the trigger pull and asked the dumb question if the scopes were dialed in for the range and yes they were. 5 Shots and 5 hits at the point of aim with the guys coaching me . Yes , the guys did the brain work but was good for me to make the hits at that distance.
 
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I've always been so impressed by long shots. Not being condescending, but how much of a shot that long do you think comes down to luck? I mean you can't predict wind, or pockets of hot or cold air, etc.
 

wpod

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I've always been so impressed by long shots. Not being condescending, but how much of a shot that long do you think comes down to luck? I mean you can't predict wind, or pockets of hot or cold air, etc.
The shooters now use range finders and electronic aids and watch the mirage on the targets and they practice and practice.
 
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I've always been so impressed by long shots. Not being condescending, but how much of a shot that long do you think comes down to luck? I mean you can't predict wind, or pockets of hot or cold air, etc.
I was watching a Canadian artillery demonstration of tank killing. Three field guns were "tied together", at that time using cables. There was a first shot followed a couple of seconds later by a double tap and a kill. The first shot finds the cross wind, subtle elevation change, warm or cold air pockets etc and the 2nd and 3rd shot take the demonstrated sum of that information (that is, where the shell passes by the target) and correct for it.

I've seen videos of long range snipers doing much the same thing, only manually. The first shot finds all that stuff. The second shot corrects for it. So if you're in a war zone and a shot passes close by, dive for cover. There may be a second and much more accurate shot right behind it.
 
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I've always been so impressed by long shots. Not being condescending, but how much of a shot that long do you think comes down to luck? I mean you can't predict wind, or pockets of hot or cold air, etc.
You can account for steady winds, elevation (thinner air), cold temperatures and so on. But on gusty days, it's more of struggle to hit anything with accuracy.
 

wpod

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What calibre were they shooting?

Precision shooting is a fun, but expensive, hobby.
One was a 6.5 Creedmore and the other was a 6.5 with a shorter case minimal recoil though both rifles has muzzle brakes, they were very expensive rifles judging by the accuracy and operation. I am not much of a rifle shooter. As mentioned the guys had the scopes dialed in perfectly . I pretty much just pulled the wonderful triggers.
 

OVERKILL

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One was a 6.5 Creedmore and the other was a 6.5 with a shorter case minimal recoil though both rifles has muzzle brakes, they were very expensive rifles judging by the accuracy and operation. I am not much of a rifle shooter.
Not surprising, 6.5 and more recently 6mm cartridges have become quite popular lately and there are quite a few of them now.

@CarbonSteel has some beautiful custom precision rifles.
 
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You can account for steady winds, elevation (thinner air), cold temperatures and so on. But on gusty days, it's more of struggle to hit anything with accuracy.
Agree with this. We use benchrest cartridges (6mm BR and 22 PPC) as well as .22-250 while shooting prairie dogs and the wind can push the bullets a bit.
 
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You can account for steady winds, elevation (thinner air), cold temperatures and so on. But on gusty days, it's more of struggle to hit anything with accuracy.
I used to shoot 1000 yard F-Class. Humbling and fun all rolled into one. I had good success with a 6.5x284. Regarding wind you could be shooting from north to south and have wind blowing from the west at 100 yards, then blowing from the east at 500 yards, and change directions a few more times before getting to the target.
 

Al

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At the range today I hit 3 out of 5 steel targets at 50 yards. Glock 19's reputation for accuracy is well deserved for sure,
 
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Amazing at even longer range distances above I think 1500 yards and above that the Coriolis effect has to be factored in has well.

That was very interesting to learn when I watched that History program about long range sniper shots.

And in Vietnam the best long range sniper of the US went head to head with was thought the best VC long range sniper. What got the VC guy into trouble was the sun angle changed has the sun set therefore giving away his position. The US guy zeroed in and took him out.

Can't remember the soliders name right this moment as I am typing this. But that was quite the amazing circumstance there.
 
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Amazing at even longer range distances above I think 1500 yards and above that the Coriolis effect has to be factored in has well.

That was very interesting to learn when I watched that History program about long range sniper shots.

And in Vietnam the best long range sniper of the US went head to head with was thought the best VC long range sniper. What got the VC guy into trouble was the sun angle changed has the sun set therefore giving away his position. The US guy zeroed in and took him out.

Can't remember the soliders name right this moment as I am typing this. But that was quite the amazing circumstance there.
Carlos Hathcock ?
 
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Amazing at even longer range distances above I think 1500 yards and above that the Coriolis effect has to be factored in has well.

That was very interesting to learn when I watched that History program about long range sniper shots.

And in Vietnam the best long range sniper of the US went head to head with was thought the best VC long range sniper. What got the VC guy into trouble was the sun angle changed has the sun set therefore giving away his position. The US guy zeroed in and took him out.

Can't remember the soliders name right this moment as I am typing this. But that was quite the amazing circumstance there.
Carlos Hathcock was the most famous U.S. sniper during Vietnam. He shot at the reflection of the VC sniper's scope and his shot went through the scope's lens into the snipers eye.
 
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