German castrol question?

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I noticed that the german castol does not say "energy conserving" on the bottle. Does that mean that it doesn't contain friction modifiers? If so, how will that affect the oil's performance?
 
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Originally posted by sbc350gearhead: I noticed that the german castol does not say "energy conserving" on the bottle. Does that mean that it doesn't contain friction modifiers? If so, how will that affect the oil's performance?
It doesn't mean that at all. The API energy conserving rating is based on an oil's ability to yield a measurable MPG increase over a reference oil. The necessary percentage increase varries based on the grade of the oil, and for a Xw30 that's on the "high side" of the 30 wt range (which the German Castrol 0w30 is), it would be very difficult for it to meet this spec. Chances are, Castrol hasn't even tested this oil against the energy conserving requirements. From my own experience using this oil, I can tell you that the 3.5 liter HO engine in my Chrysler 300M gets just as good gas mileage with the Castrol 0w30 as it did with Mobil 1 10w30. I just completed a three-day road trip of about 900 miles and I averaged 28.1 mpg for the entire trip. This was mostly interstate driving at 70-75 mph, with roughly 40% of that in the mountains of western Tenn. and eastern NC.
 
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Originally posted by G-Man II: From my own experience using this oil, I can tell you that the 3.5 liter HO engine in my Chrysler 300M gets just as good gas mileage with the Castrol 0w30 as it did with Mobil 1 10w30. I just completed a three-day road trip of about 900 miles and I averaged 28.1 mpg for the entire trip. This was mostly interstate driving at 70-75 mph, with roughly 40% of that in the mountains of western Tenn. and eastern NC.
G-Man II, That is an interesting test of "theory" and "practice." Mobil 1 0W40 is, in its latest formulation, an "Energy Conserving" oil (says it in the "doughnut"), but Castrol 0W30 is not. Yet, from what you say, I'm guessing you'd have the same gas mileage results when comparing the Castrol 0W30 and the M1 0W40. So how is that in testing one gets the rating at a 40wt and the other doesn't as a 30wt? If your mileage results are similar at the 30wt level, the Castrol has got to do as well or better against M1 40 wt (unless they have put some "magic" in the latter). [ August 15, 2003, 01:29 PM: Message edited by: pscholte ]
 
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Originally posted by pscholte: That is an interesting test of "theory" and "practice." Mobil 1 0W40 is, in its latest formulation, an "Energy Conserving" oil (says it in the "doughnut"), but Castrol 0W30 is not. Yet, from what you say, I'm guessing you'd have the same gas mileage results when comparing the Castrol 0W30 and the M1 0W40. So how is that in testing one gets the rating at a 40wt and the other doesn't as a 30wt?
To achieve the energy conserving rating, a Xw40 oil doesn't have to show AS MUCH mpg improvement as a Xw30 oil. I can't find the table right now, but the percentage increase over the reference oil is higher for a Xw30 than a Xw40 (and it's higher for a Xw20 than a Xw30). That's how the Mobil 1 0w40 can get the rating, and the Castrol SLX can't.
 
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...didn't understand that's how it is determined...thanks. [ August 15, 2003, 01:36 PM: Message edited by: pscholte ]
 
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