Brake lines: Aftermarket vs. NOS

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The brake lines that go from the front calipers to the steel lines that run under the girlfriends Volvo are getting somewhat frayed and will need replaced soon. Would you guys go aftermarket (about $30 each) or buy some NOS from the Volvo dealership? I have no idea on the prices.. sick
 
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"Frayed" ? Then instead of brake lines I assume you mean brake hoses. They should be replaced long before they become frayed. No reason to go to the dealer. As long as they are DOT certified, they are good to go. Actually, I've been using the ones sold on ebay from Argentina (easier to get here), and they are fine. They just haven't gone through the certification process. If you are actually talking about the steel lines, They can be made from standard steel tubing, as I did for my Corvair and will eventually do for my Renault.
 

JHZR2

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Aftermarket if you have reason to believe that they are newer and that the oe hoses gave sat. Not sure that assessment is valid though!
 
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Originally Posted By: widman
"Frayed" ? Then instead of brake lines I assume you mean brake hoses. They should be replaced long before they become frayed. No reason to go to the dealer. As long as they are DOT certified, they are good to go. Actually, I've been using the ones sold on ebay from Argentina (easier to get here), and they are fine. They just haven't gone through the certification process. If you are actually talking about the steel lines, They can be made from standard steel tubing, as I did for my Corvair and will eventually do for my Renault.
Widman as you are into restorations have you tried NiCOPP lines? Amazing stuff, i don't buy steel lines anymore for anything automotive. http://www.agscompany.com/automotive/brake-fuel-transmission-lines/nicopp/11
 
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Guilford, CT
Originally Posted By: Trav
Originally Posted By: widman
"Frayed" ? Then instead of brake lines I assume you mean brake hoses. They should be replaced long before they become frayed. No reason to go to the dealer. As long as they are DOT certified, they are good to go. Actually, I've been using the ones sold on ebay from Argentina (easier to get here), and they are fine. They just haven't gone through the certification process. If you are actually talking about the steel lines, They can be made from standard steel tubing, as I did for my Corvair and will eventually do for my Renault.
Widman as you are into restorations have you tried NiCOPP lines? Amazing stuff, i don't buy steel lines anymore for anything automotive. http://www.agscompany.com/automotive/brake-fuel-transmission-lines/nicopp/11
I recently replaced (almost) every brake line in my project Bronco with NiCopp lines. The only original lines left are the two that go from the master cylinder to the ABS unit. All the rest are brand new NiCopp. I'd never use anything else. They're super easy to bend and flare and they'll never rust again.
 

Astro14

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Originally Posted By: Smcatub
I'd go through FCP Groton or IPD and get the non-Volvo branded, but made by the same company that makes them for Volvo, lines
This. http://www.ipdusa.com http://www.fcpeuro.com/Volvo-parts/ They're both good companies and will save you quite a bit over dealer prices. By the way, NOS means "New Old Stock". It's used in the collector car community to mean new parts from a long time ago...I think you meant OE, for "Original Equipment"
 
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I usually have to work with something available in the market, so buy steel lines for fuel and brakes. I'm leery about anything that isn't steel under the car, as I had a 56 Land Rover once and constantly had brake lines smashed or broken by rocks. I did become an expert at stopping with downshifts and turning off the key in first.
 

dlundblad

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Can you read the OEM writing on the factory hoses? If they were made by CEC of Italy, those are the same hoses sold by "uRO" brand, and are easy to get. Also, how do you know that the hoses at the dealership are really old? Plus, hoses stored in a dealership have never been exposed to heat, pressure, road salt, flexing, or expired brake fluid.
 

Astro14

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Both hoses should be good. Both ATE and Meyle are good parts suppliers. Since ATE specializes in brakes, I might lean towards that set...and they're .50 cheaper....
 

dlundblad

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These things look to be a bit goofy to bleed. Looks like you go left front, right front, left rear and right rear.. Then each caliper has 2 bleeders. A Volvo forum said something about a clutch under the air box too.
 

Astro14

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Depends on the year of Volvo. My 1985 Volvo had two bleeders on each of its 4 piston front calipers. From about 1992 onward, they're conventional sliding single piston calipers, with just one bleed screw each...
 

dlundblad

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Hmmm. Found this little write up on mathewsvolvosite.com. Is bleeding your brakes right rear, left rear and right front and left front really an old way of doing things? "Now that cars have ABS controllers it really doesn't matter which wheel you start bleeding or the order it is done in. All brake cylinders are their own circuits. In the old days before ABS the method you mentioned was the correct way to do it. This method of pumping the brakes will get most of the old brake fluid out, but not all of the fluid that is in the ABS solenoid block. To get that fluid out of the ABS block you need to actuate these solenoids, either by envoking the ABS to function (like jamming on the brakes and then doing a second bleed) or by having a shop do the bleed with their computer connected to the car to operate the ABS solenoids. Just manually flushing the system should be good enough, as most of the fluid that has dirt and moisture in it will be in the calipers. I use a pressure bleeder that screws on the top of the master cylinder, which forces the old fluid out and replaces it with new fluid."
 
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