Are synthetic oils made from crude oil?

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371
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TYLER, TEXAS
Just like the title says. I'm pretty sure Group 3 oils are made from crude oil sence they're made with dino oil base stocks. But are Group 4 oils made from crude oil? Even though they're made from synthetic base stocks? Also, if synthetic oils are made from crude oil, does it take more or less crude oil to manufacture them vs. dino oils? Thanks in advance. [Patriot]
 
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drstressor, I understand (informationally if not intellectually) that alpha olefins are made from the "top" of the refining process of crude oil or from natural gas; but how, are they and the esters and alcohols and all those thin things made into a viscous fluid? TNX
 
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Reno Nevada
I think you are asking a chemistry question that goes beyond what this board is about. If you go to a library and find a college level organic chemistry textbook that illustrates the structures, you should be able to learn what you want to know. Basically, you start with ethylene gas (2C), which has the 2 carbon atoms held together by a double bond. Ethylene can be polymerized using a standard organic chemistry reaction into alpha-olefins, such as 1-octene (8C), 1-decene (10C), or 1-dodecene (12C). Alpha-olefins have a single double bond between the 1st and 2nd carbon atoms; all the rest of the carbon atoms are fully saturated with hydrogen. POA lubricants are generally produced by polymerizing a single size class of alpha-olefin, such as 1-decene, so that the final reaction products can be more carefully controlled. The polymerization reaction proceeds by addition of 1-decene units to the double bonded alpha carbon of other 1-decene units. The resulting product contains linear and branch chain hydrocarbons with unsaturated bonds at the terminal carbons. These are then saturated with hydrogen by a process known as hydro-finishing. The longer the hydrocarbon chains, the higher the viscosity of the finished product. The mass of the finished products are some multiple of the initial monomeric unit (i.e. C20, C30, C40 if you started with 1-decene). Ester based lubricants are produced by polymerizing defined organic acids and alcohols using controlled oxidation reactions.
 
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drstressor, Thanks...I think you've helped me to understand the general idea. I was an English major, so progress, of whatever magnitude, is welcome. [ July 27, 2003, 08:30 PM: Message edited by: pscholte ]
 
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666
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Ottawa, Ont CANADA
quote:
Originally posted by Drstressor: I think you are asking a chemistry question that goes beyond what this board is about. If you go to a library and find a college level organic chemistry textbook that illustrates the structures, you should be able to learn what you want to know. Basically, you start with ethylene gas (2C), which has the 2 carbon atoms held together by a double bond. Ethylene can be polymerized using a standard organic chemistry reaction into alpha-olefins, such as 1-octene (8C), 1-decene (10C), or 1-dodecene (12C). Alpha-olefins have a single double bond between the 1st and 2nd carbon atoms; all the rest of the carbon atoms are fully saturated with hydrogen. POA lubricants are generally produced by polymerizing a single size class of alpha-olefin, such as 1-decene, so that the final reaction products can be more carefully controlled. The polymerization reaction proceeds by addition of 1-decene units to the double bonded alpha carbon of other 1-decene units. The resulting product contains linear and branch chain hydrocarbons with unsaturated bonds at the terminal carbons. These are then saturated with hydrogen by a process known as hydro-finishing. The longer the hydrocarbon chains, the higher the viscosity of the finished product. The mass of the finished products are some multiple of the initial monomeric unit (i.e. C20, C30, C40 if you started with 1-decene). Ester based lubricants are produced by polymerizing defined organic acids and alcohols using controlled oxidation reactions.
[stretch] I think I need another Scotch.... [HAIL 2 U!]
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,908
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quote:
The longer the hydrocarbon chains, the higher the viscosity of the finished product.
And generally speaking, the more branching the better the oxidation and thermal stability.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by MolaKule: [QUOTE] And generally speaking, the more branching the better the oxidation and thermal stability. Doesn't more branching mean more tertiary hydrogens and greater reactivity? Isn't it the branching than makes isooctane a better gasoline?
 
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The branched forms are more resistant to mechanical shear induced oxidation and have a higher VI. The tertiary carbons are fully saturated in finished PAO base oils. They respond very well to oxidation inhibitors.
 
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666
Location
Ottawa, Ont CANADA
quote:
Originally posted by Ray H:
quote:
Originally posted by 2K2AcuraTL: I think I need another Scotch....
And would you like that as "synthahol" or a distilled single malt?

Distilled single malts are usualy in order... [Big Grin]
 
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