2020 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition CrewMax Review

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Originally Posted by CKN
The study examines 233 problems, which are organized into nine categories: Climate Driving Assistance Driving Experience Exterior Features/Controls/Displays (FCD) Infotainment Interior Powertrain Seats Entering its 34th year, IQS has undergone major enhancements, including: Problems caused by brought in technology and services Problems caused by the interaction of the vehicle and the environment Problems caused by advanced driver assistance systems https://www.jdpower.com/business/automotive/us-initial-quality-study-iqs
IQS is first not a long term reliability study, it is right there in the name, and secondly, as I said, none of these are weighted, so a complaint with the infotainment is treated as being the same as an engine failure.
 
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MA
Originally Posted by CKN
Originally Posted by PWMDMD
FWIW....there is a simplicity at work in the Tundra that I appreciate.
That's a great spin on "ancient".
Cool...
 
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Florida
Guys and gals its a free market to choose whatever vehicle and color you want. Its best that some buy Chevy, GM, Ford, etc. We need that for competition to keep pricing in check. That being said. Viewing real world and discussing vehicles with many people I will stick with Toyota. No need to try to convince me otherwise as I have been buying Toyota for the last 35 years. Personally I have no desire to own a Ford, GM or another brand. As mentioned its good that others purchase them as competition is good. Personally I keep my vehicles as long as possible. My 17 year old Tacoma is still fun to drive and maintain.
 
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New England
Originally Posted by dareo
The Tundra is the most conservative half ton play. You know exactly what it costs to buy and fuel it and you can expect trouble free use for a very long time. Its nothing that interests me but its a solid choice.
I wonder if this can give the service of my parents 2001 Tundra 4wd Extra Cab V8. It has 160k and only required them to replace starter, muffler, fuel door, and recharge AC over the 19 years of service. I will state the frame was replaced by Toyota recall who did an exemplary job and it ended up getting the timing belt replaced for about $400 since engine was exposed.
 
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Originally Posted by madRiver
Originally Posted by dareo
The Tundra is the most conservative half ton play. You know exactly what it costs to buy and fuel it and you can expect trouble free use for a very long time. Its nothing that interests me but its a solid choice.
I wonder if this can give the service of my parents 2001 Tundra 4wd Extra Cab V8. It has 160k and only required them to replace starter, muffler, fuel door, and recharge AC over the 19 years of service. I will state the frame was replaced by Toyota recall who did an exemplary job and it ended up getting the timing belt replaced for about $400 since engine was exposed.
That didn't sound too bad, not until you mentioned the frame... At the same time, any vehicle in the Northeast can lose a frame. Many have--and they all weren't Toyota's. After a decade I'm not sure frame rot should count--ideally no frame would rot out, but I'm pretty sure there are "many" GM, Ford, Dodge trucks in need of frame repair after 10+ years. Without a doubt Toyota has been the worst at this, but it's not like everyone else can get a free pass on this one.
 
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Nashville, TN via Memphis
Originally Posted by littlehulkster
See, the funny thing is the NHTSA combed all those cars over time and time again, and found absolutely nothing wrong with them. Furthermore, it is actually impossible for it to happen, as there is no car made or sold anywhere in the western world (at least) without brakes capable of stopping and holding a car at full throttle. That's not even to mention the ability to shift into neutral or simply shut the car off. The "unintended acceleration" was simply a ID-10-T error spurred by a litigious society. No one wants to admit that they, or their loved one, hit the throttle instead of the brakes.
Correct. I never understood how so many people had that happen, when all you'd have to do is step on the brake or pop it into neutral.
 

Astro14

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Originally Posted by supton
Originally Posted by madRiver
Originally Posted by dareo
The Tundra is the most conservative half ton play. You know exactly what it costs to buy and fuel it and you can expect trouble free use for a very long time. Its nothing that interests me but its a solid choice.
I wonder if this can give the service of my parents 2001 Tundra 4wd Extra Cab V8. It has 160k and only required them to replace starter, muffler, fuel door, and recharge AC over the 19 years of service. I will state the frame was replaced by Toyota recall who did an exemplary job and it ended up getting the timing belt replaced for about $400 since engine was exposed.
That didn't sound too bad, not until you mentioned the frame... At the same time, any vehicle in the Northeast can lose a frame. Many have--and they all weren't Toyota's. After a decade I'm not sure frame rot should count--ideally no frame would rot out, but I'm pretty sure there are "many" GM, Ford, Dodge trucks in need of frame repair after 10+ years. Without a doubt Toyota has been the worst at this, but it's not like everyone else can get a free pass on this one.
Toyota has been replacing frames on Tundras, Tacoma's and 4Runners for a decade now. The warranty is essentially unlimited, they've covered trucks that are far past ten years old. No other manufacturer has stepped up like Toyota in fixing this kind of problem. The frames were made by Dana, the US company, in Ohio. So, ironically, Toyota started having problems when they started using US made frames...
 
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...
Originally Posted by john_pifer
Originally Posted by littlehulkster
See, the funny thing is the NHTSA combed all those cars over time and time again, and found absolutely nothing wrong with them. Furthermore, it is actually impossible for it to happen, as there is no car made or sold anywhere in the western world (at least) without brakes capable of stopping and holding a car at full throttle. That's not even to mention the ability to shift into neutral or simply shut the car off. The "unintended acceleration" was simply a ID-10-T error spurred by a litigious society. No one wants to admit that they, or their loved one, hit the throttle instead of the brakes.
Correct. I never understood how so many people had that happen, when all you'd have to do is step on the brake or pop it into neutral.
Mitsubishi had the same issue in Asia. Unintended acceleration incidents they were called. Some were posted on video. Check out the video below. It's totally unbelievable. Not only did the Pajero accelerate on its own, it shifted from reverse to drive as well. ...‚...‚. Totally made up in my opinion. https://youtu.be/3uD6XN36Iyk
 
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The ATL
Originally Posted by Astro14
Originally Posted by supton
Originally Posted by madRiver
Originally Posted by dareo
The Tundra is the most conservative half ton play. You know exactly what it costs to buy and fuel it and you can expect trouble free use for a very long time. Its nothing that interests me but its a solid choice.
I wonder if this can give the service of my parents 2001 Tundra 4wd Extra Cab V8. It has 160k and only required them to replace starter, muffler, fuel door, and recharge AC over the 19 years of service. I will state the frame was replaced by Toyota recall who did an exemplary job and it ended up getting the timing belt replaced for about $400 since engine was exposed.
That didn't sound too bad, not until you mentioned the frame... At the same time, any vehicle in the Northeast can lose a frame. Many have--and they all weren't Toyota's. After a decade I'm not sure frame rot should count--ideally no frame would rot out, but I'm pretty sure there are "many" GM, Ford, Dodge trucks in need of frame repair after 10+ years. Without a doubt Toyota has been the worst at this, but it's not like everyone else can get a free pass on this one.
Toyota has been replacing frames on Tundras, Tacoma's and 4Runners for a decade now. The warranty is essentially unlimited, they've covered trucks that are far past ten years old. No other manufacturer has stepped up like Toyota in fixing this kind of problem. The frames were made by Dana, the US company, in Ohio. So, ironically, Toyota started having problems when they started using US made frames...
Exactly. The frame rust is because they were not coated according to Toyota's specifications. Toyota STILL stepped up for their customers. Having cars from the big 3, I can tell you they are MUCH less likely to take care of their customers. They rely on the people that will always buy their stuff no matter what. If the Toyota haters would watch South Main Auto's YouTube channel, Eric O. periodically talks about all of the cars/trucks he services in NYS that fail his state inspections from all types of manufacturers due to frame/underbody rust. Some aren't even 10 years old.
 

CT8

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I have owned a 84 Toyota truck then a 92 Toyota truck then a 2006 Tacoma, which my son now has. I like Toyota trucks. I have driven a few Tundra s and they are nice, but then I have owned a 79 Ford F150 and a 2002 F250 and my present Fords and I like them. The reliability has been about equal with all of Toyota and Fords I have had. Probably the best vehicle ever so far I have owned was the 2002 F250. All were purchased new and 100% maintained and repaired by me. I have owned 2 GM products and will not purchase another.
 
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NH
Heh, hadn't thought about that, the frame problem dating to a switch to a US vendor. Still, I won't give them a pass for it--but I won't give a pass to older non-Toyota trucks with failed frames either. They all had problems with rust. And that's my point--inside the 10 year window one doesn't expect these problems, but complaining about first gen Tundra's or similar vintage Tacos and failed frames, that really shouldn't come into the discussion. Not when it's a common problem across all makes at that age.
 
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the canyons
Originally Posted by Astro14
Originally Posted by supton
Originally Posted by madRiver
Originally Posted by dareo
The Tundra is the most conservative half ton play. You know exactly what it costs to buy and fuel it and you can expect trouble free use for a very long time. Its nothing that interests me but its a solid choice.
I wonder if this can give the service of my parents 2001 Tundra 4wd Extra Cab V8. It has 160k and only required them to replace starter, muffler, fuel door, and recharge AC over the 19 years of service. I will state the frame was replaced by Toyota recall who did an exemplary job and it ended up getting the timing belt replaced for about $400 since engine was exposed.
That didn't sound too bad, not until you mentioned the frame... At the same time, any vehicle in the Northeast can lose a frame. Many have--and they all weren't Toyota's. After a decade I'm not sure frame rot should count--ideally no frame would rot out, but I'm pretty sure there are "many" GM, Ford, Dodge trucks in need of frame repair after 10+ years. Without a doubt Toyota has been the worst at this, but it's not like everyone else can get a free pass on this one.
Toyota has been replacing frames on Tundras, Tacoma's and Sequoias for a decade now. The warranty is essentially unlimited, they've covered trucks that are far past ten years old. No other manufacturer has stepped up like Toyota in fixing this kind of problem. The frames were made by Dana, the US company, in Ohio. So, ironically, Toyota started having problems when they started using US made frames...
Fixed. The 4Runner has always been made in Japan. It didn't get the defective Dana Corp frames.
 
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4,065
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Central Virginia
Since we are comparing trucks, I have an even more "ancient" 4.3 4 speed automatic Silverado extended cab that still gets 20+ mpg on a trip, so the older tech may or may not be a factor with gas mileage. Also, only issue in 8 years has been a 30 dollar fuel tank pressure sensor which I replaced myself. Also, union made in the USA by an American company in Fort Wayne, IN. People can buy what they want, but IMO trucks are what the 'Muricans do right. I do have to mash the gas to the floor to get it up to speed sometimes on the on ramps though, but it gets up to speed. Not very good power.
 
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CKN

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Utah
Originally Posted by Silverado12
Since we are comparing trucks, I have an even more "ancient" 4.3 4 speed automatic Silverado extended cab that still gets 20+ mpg on a trip, so the older tech may or may not be a factor with gas mileage. Also, only issue in 8 years has been a 30 dollar fuel tank pressure sensor which I replaced myself. Also, union made in the USA by an American company in Fort Wayne, IN. People can buy what they want, but IMO trucks are what the 'Muricans do right. I do have to mash the gas to the floor to get it up to speed sometimes on the on ramps though, but it gets up to speed. Not very good power.
The same people are making the Tundra in Texas.......
 

oilpsi2high

Thread starter
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NY, USA, etc.
Oh wow, I didn't think this would even get to 6 pages! So I've been in the market for a 1/2 ton for a while now. Toyota just isn't putting the cash on the hood of these trucks, mainly due to low inventory. Here's what I wanted to get: [Linked Image] The best price I could get on that truck, a 2020 Tundra SR5 Double Cab 4x4 here in Albany NY, was $ 41,000 + TTL. By comparison, I've seen RAM 1500 Big Horn Double Cabs advertised for significantly less. I had a local dealer down to $ 35,000 + TTL on a black 2020 Ram 1500 Big Horn Quad Cab 4x4 with the Hemi. Sticker was $ 45,000. The same deals can be had on GM trucks. I haven't shopped Nissan in a while, so I am not sure what they are doing for incentives right now. In that case, it doesn't make sense to pay a six thousand dollar premium for the Toyota, because you can blow up the engine at least once in the Ram and Chevy, and still come out ahead price-wise. Toyota is still the best for Depreciation, but it's not six thousand dollars worth of a difference. I still think the Tundra 1794 Edition is the best truck for the money if your budget is $ 50,000. smile The interior really is that good. Everyone I had in that truck was blown away by it, and didn't even know Toyota made a luxury version of the Tundra. If your dealer has one, I urge you to check it out in person if you are curious. The pictures don't really do it justice.
 
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Do some research on how well the Tundras hold their value on the used market. And I'm talking actual prices, not any of that kbb.com bull. They're bought and paid for. That extra cash that the other makes throw in at the sale dwindles away to nothing in just a few years.
 

CKN

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Originally Posted by PowerSurge
Do some research on how well the Tundras hold their value on the used market. And I'm talking actual prices, not any of that kbb.com bull. They're bought and paid for. That extra cash that the other makes throw in at the sale dwindles away to nothing in just a few years.
So your saying that buyers of used Tundras pay over book for used ones? Is that what you are saying? Sure would like to see some links on this. Looking on KBB.com (which you seem want to discredit) there is a $2,000 difference (trade in value) in a 2016 model year Tundra SR5 compared to a Silverado LT (both priced with standard equipment). I'm guessing when bought new there is at least a five thousand spread on these-at least. The misinformation about quality, resale value and the like on this board about Toyotas are worse and even more far-flung than the comments about Michelin tires or Crown Vics......
 
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524
Location
Lead, South Dakota
Originally Posted by oilpsi2high
Oh wow, I didn't think this would even get to 6 pages! So I've been in the market for a 1/2 ton for a while now. Toyota just isn't putting the cash on the hood of these trucks, mainly due to low inventory. Here's what I wanted to get: [Linked Image] The best price I could get on that truck, a 2020 Tundra SR5 Double Cab 4x4 here in Albany NY, was $ 41,000 + TTL. By comparison, I've seen RAM 1500 Big Horn Double Cabs advertised for significantly less. I had a local dealer down to $ 35,000 + TTL on a black 2020 Ram 1500 Big Horn Quad Cab 4x4 with the Hemi. Sticker was $ 45,000. The same deals can be had on GM trucks. I haven't shopped Nissan in a while, so I am not sure what they are doing for incentives right now. In that case, it doesn't make sense to pay a six thousand dollar premium for the Toyota, because you can blow up the engine at least once in the Ram and Chevy, and still come out ahead price-wise. Toyota is still the best for Depreciation, but it's not six thousand dollars worth of a difference. I still think the Tundra 1794 Edition is the best truck for the money if your budget is $ 50,000. smile The interior really is that good. Everyone I had in that truck was blown away by it, and didn't even know Toyota made a luxury version of the Tundra. If your dealer has one, I urge you to check it out in person if you are curious. The pictures don't really do it justice.
Yeah, that's the problem with Toyota trucks. The dealers don't have to budge on prices. They know they will sell that pickup at sticker. TBF, while I still stand by everything I said before, I don't know if they're really worth the money as it is now. The platform is reliable, but very dated. Although I kind of take the line that none of the half tons are worth what they're charging, but it seems very few agree as well as they sell.
 
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