What lube for brake pads will be long lasting and still be there when doing next brake job?

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Must be a east coast/rust belt thing. Dried out pins and rusty contact points are a non-issue out here.


That stuff may be fine on the back of the pads, but it should not be used on any sliding surfaces. It is a rubbery/tacky material.

I did not mean to imply it should be used on sliding surfaces; sorry if I were misunderstood. I'll try to be explicitly clear: Sil-Glyde or 3M silicon paste on the caliper pins, Moly grease on the pad ears, CRC 05016 on the backs of pads in caliper contact areas and contact areas of pistons, and your favorite anti-seize on hub-to-wheel contact areas. Folks may also consider my opinion worth what you've paid for it.
 
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I use AGS Sil-Glyde most of the time, in the little gray single-use packet that auto parts stores tend to display at the counter.

However, I much prefer Permatex Silicone Ceramic Extreme. It's orange, waterproof, long-lasting, and safe on rubber and plastic.
 
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I know everyone has their favorite brake lubes, but which ones last the longest? I use and like 3m Silicone Paste for slider pins, but what is the best brake pad lube for metal-to-metal contact? I'm looking for something that will lubricate well and prevent noisy brakes, of course, but most importantly, still be there when it's time to remove and replace the brake pads. Any recommendations?

I have been using this for pins and all sorts of stuff, couldnt be happier with the product, it last.


For the ears and sliding parts I always find myself going back to the old standby.

 

cos

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Trav thanks, I may have to try that CRC 05359.

I just did a complete brake job on my SRX and used what I've been using for yrs: Sil-Glyde on the pads and pins, Permatex Anti-Seize on the hub.
Does Sil-Glyde work well? Yes. Last long? Well this is a good thread because in the snowbelt I've never used anything that really lasted. I don't know what auto factories use on the assembly line but whatever that is certainly doesn't seem to last either.
 
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Sil-Glyde does work well on pins, it is a bit thin for the back of pads for my liking for that I use the CRC. I use the silicone in the can on the pins now because it is smoother than the 3M stuff and thicker than the Sil-Glyde and it has many other uses. It is probably no better than the Sil-Glyde on the pins, they both seem to hang in there a long time it just keeps the amount of products down and it is very reasonably priced.

Use the paste on a long wooden Q tip to lube window tracks, the power window performance is dramatically improved not to mention the drag and strain on components like the cables and motor, spark pug boot, door and trunk seals, etc. You can put a dab of it in bulb sockets to prevent corrosion it is dielectric.
It is not harmful to the rubber found in brake systems and preserves rubber parts.
 
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I am curious about Trav's Mission Automotive dielectric grease and I inquired to the company for their SDS to see if I can determine who makes it for them. I will follow up if they reply.

Apparently Mission Automotive is the label of a 7 person internet sales company in San Francisco: https://www.impresaproducts.com/ ....They have quite the oddball assortment of products.

Not trying to bust any balls here. Heck, I talked to someone at the AGS company in Muskegon, MI when I was curious about SilGlyde. Mission Automotive marketing is impressive. A convincing product label with good internet publicity (Amazon, You Tube, Forums)and they have established themselves as a contender to 3M, Dow, Permatex, etc.. Fascinating.
 
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I am sure they don't manufacture the product just package it, which is common. The quality seems consistent enough though, even if 50% of the normally worthless reviews are fake it still would have over 700 5 star reviews. All I can say is I use it and am 100% satisfied with it.
 
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and they have established themselves as a contender to 3M, Dow, Permatex, etc.. Fascinating.
Dow Corning(or is it DuPont now?) has a mass-market line of silicones named Xiameter they sell direct to repackagers and formulators and some of the older Molykote/Dow silicone compounds as well as mass-market silicones not under patent are sold there. I also know Momentive, the former GE Silicones division now owned by KCC of Korea also sells generic silicones for repackaging. I would be surprised if that Mission grease is really a Dow DuPont or Momentive product under the hood.
 
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I received the SDS. Based on the NSF number 122830, it appears to be Husky 350 which has low viscosity silicone oil. Husky 220-R is medium viscosity silicone oil and is what they market for automotive brake use. Both are grade 3 grease. Maybe Mission has the wrong SDS? Someone else can pursue this if they choose (I've exhausted my OCD allotment).

Not sure how to post the Mission SDS PDF.
 
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X15

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I received the SDS. Based on the NSF number 122830, it appears to be Husky 350 which has low viscosity silicone oil. Husky 220-R is medium viscosity silicone oil and is what they market for automotive brake use. Both are grade 3 grease. Maybe Mission has the wrong SDS? Someone else can pursue this if they choose (I've exhausted my OCD allotment).

Not sure how to post the Mission SDS PDF.

Save the PDF to your computer than click the Attach files button at the bottom left of where you type in a reply, select the PDF and it'll upload it to the forum for everyone to view.
 
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I’m using EZE Slide by Kleen Flo. It’s a silicone based synthetic lubricant. Works well. This tube happens to be made in Canada. Bonus! Www.Kleenflo.com

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Sil-Glyde has similar all encompassing usage verbage. I ignore it.

I think there's a reason both Honda and Toyota FSM's recommend their moly greases for pads and silicone for pins. Silicone decomposes around 450F and brake pads easily get there. The moly powder left behind by the moly grease will continue to work after the first time it cooks.
 
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Love the green Permatex for my brake caliper and brake pads and the copper 3M antiseize for the wheel hub/rotor surface. Not sure why the purple stuff with ceramic on the lubricant is a good idea? Not attacking anyone. Just never made sense to me why ceramic belonged in a lubricant?

 
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No one is recommending re-doing the slide pin lubrication or metal-to-metal lube to be done every year or two vs having it last many, many years ? Unless the OP changes brakes every 1-2 years ?
In NYC, you might be taking your wheels off once a year just to see if you blew up a control arm or strut on a pothole, much less to inspect the caliper pins! Seriously, though, the rust is such a pita. I've had stuck caliper pins and rusted hardware causing seized pads more than any human being who drives 6,000 miles a year should be getting.
 
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Sil-Glyde has similar all encompassing usage verbage. I ignore it.

I think there's a reason both Honda and Toyota FSM's recommend their moly greases for pads and silicone for pins. Silicone decomposes around 450F and brake pads easily get there. The moly powder left behind by the moly grease will continue to work after the first time it cooks.
Molykote M-77 and AS-880N still have a silicone or PAO base. It’s the solid film lubricants like moly, graphite or fluoroplastics that take over once the oil carrier burns off.

Toyota calls for an esoteric glycol-based lithium thickened grease for their slide pins, so does Subaru. Whatever it is, it’s good stuff. On a friend’s Forester that’s exposed to road salt and other flotsam in the winter, the slide pins still move after a yearly brake inspection.
 
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