Two tales of elder abuse

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9,013
Location
Virginia
Tell ya what Nick1994 it is people like your grandma and you that make my work so great. It is truly you all that make it to where I enjoy what I do. I'm one of the most fortunate guys to do what I do.
 
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7,775
Location
Oklahoma
My wife is a home dialysis RN for a major company, not going to name names, but some of the stuff she tells me about from what she sees/hears from the doctors is bone chilling. She basically said that if you only have medicare when you get old, you chance of living longer if you get sick are zilch. Doctors aren't making hardly any money through medicare, so what they are doing now what she calls "herding." These doctors get more money through quantity than quality. Breaking my wife's heart. Over the past two months I can see a change in her demeanor. Trying to slowly convince her to take a risk and just get another job. We can manage fine financially if she needs time to re-group. RN jobs are plentiful, but she feels like she's making a difference in some people's lives.
 

Al

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19,154
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
Originally Posted By: Wolf359
It's an interesting theory, but those numbers come from John Hopkins and other journals and papers. Where's your evidence that it comes from ambulance chasers? Incidentally they don't have a very good success rate, when I worked at a law firm that did insurance defense including medical malpractice, the win/loss ratio was more like 2/3 doctors, 1/3 patients. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/med...death_in_the_us https://journals.lww.com/journalpatientsafety/Fulltext/2013/09000/A_New,_Evidence_based_Estimate_of_Patient_Harms.2.aspx
Its still not a complete. How about comparing the lives medical intervention saves. I could not find it directly but a start is that for every one life that it takes (and it is likely that many of these patients would have died without any intervention) how many lives are saved. So trying to be objective..Medicine causes .75 average shortening of life and contributes 4.5 year of extra life. In other words 6:1. That is very conservative. That boils down to 1.5 millioin lives saved. But that is misleading..shut down medical intervention totally and you are looking at way more lives than this 1.5 mil. And your second reference is by ambulance chasers btw. https://80000hours.org/2012/08/how-many-lives-does-a-doctor-save/
 
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5,571
Location
Los Gatos, CA
I cared for my folks for the past 20 years. My Mom passed 10 years ago, peacefully at home. It was her time.
My Dad did pretty will for the next 5 years, living alone. I was there everyday. I told work this was my priority; they supported me 110%.
The last 5 years, I had a wonderful woman from Tonga live with him, as he could not be alone. I was still there everyday. It was expensive, of course, but he had the best of care and lived at home until he passed at 95 almost 2 years ago. Hospice was amazing. Without Lolomani, aka Mani, he would have been in a home. It takes qualified, knowledgeable people to do this; you cannot do it alone. Especially in my case, as my father was not a nice man. Ever. All the medicare and hospice personnel told me we were the very rare case. Most children do not visit or visit for a few minutes. Those people have their head in an impossible place. I have no regrets in the passing of my folks. I visit their grave weekly. All good.
 
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3,030
Location
Chicago Area
hospice personnel told me we were the very rare case. Most children do not visit or visit for a few minutes. ...

I got the same reaction when I took time off of work to be with Mom as she was in 4 different hospitals for 3 months. Staff was not used to seeing that, and I did my part by making sure they knew I was there, but staying out of the way until I saw something that I felt needed explaining or correcting.

Once she was released, a nurse was assigned to visit her at home 2-3 times a week for something like 6 weeks. She was also surprised when she heard that I was staying with Mom until I ran out my FMLA-protected leave, and that my sister would be coming in during my last week to cover the next 3 months. I remember the nurse telling me that when she read Mom's history she had some concerns about her recovery, but once she heard that family would be with her, she had a better feeling about there actually being a recovery.
 
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5,571
Location
Los Gatos, CA
I got the same reaction when I took time off of work to be with Mom as she was in 4 different hospitals for 3 months. Staff was not used to seeing that, and I did my part by making sure they knew I was there, but staying out of the way until I saw something that I felt needed explaining or correcting.

Once she was released, a nurse was assigned to visit her at home 2-3 times a week for something like 6 weeks. She was also surprised when she heard that I was staying with Mom until I ran out my FMLA-protected leave, and that my sister would be coming in during my last week to cover the next 3 months. I remember the nurse telling me that when she read Mom's history she had some concerns about her recovery, but once she heard that family would be with her, she had a better feeling about there actually being a recovery.
Well done opus1. It is a lot, but they took care of us when we were little. I was lucky enough in many ways to be able to do so. And the support of my company made it all possible. Yes, I was lucky.
Again, well done opus1.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
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45,322
Location
New Jersey
These stories break my heart. So did visiting my elder relatives when they were in these places at the end of their days. They were constantly surrounded by loved ones, but you see so many old folks that aren’t.
 
Messages
9,013
Location
Virginia
I got the same reaction when I took time off of work to be with Mom as she was in 4 different hospitals for 3 months. Staff was not used to seeing that, and I did my part by making sure they knew I was there, but staying out of the way until I saw something that I felt needed explaining or correcting.

Once she was released, a nurse was assigned to visit her at home 2-3 times a week for something like 6 weeks. She was also surprised when she heard that I was staying with Mom until I ran out my FMLA-protected leave, and that my sister would be coming in during my last week to cover the next 3 months. I remember the nurse telling me that when she read Mom's history she had some concerns about her recovery, but once she heard that family would be with her, she had a better feeling about there actually being a recovery.


It is true some people do not have many or any family that come by and see them regularly....

I worked in a high end long term care facility and generally a decent percentage of the patients there had people come by. Some routinely. Which was very good to see.

One lady Ms. S which I called grumpy cat really did not like her children all too much... Ms. S was actually a very nice lady once you got to know her. She just was a bit short at times... Just needed to be patient with her.

One of the best comments I ever had was when a patient's wife told me I treated her husband like a real person... That meant a lot to me. Because I believed in that fundamental principle.
 
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