The thin grease for firearms

Got this what looks like military issue rifle grease 30+ years ago at a gun show. No MIL-SPEC info on the container. Who knows how old it was when I bought it. It's stayed the same consistancy and hasn't solidified at all since I got it. It's very thin and works very well on slide rails. Just takes a small amount, and I use a toothpick to apply a thin layer. Wish I could find more someplace. [Linked Image] [Linked Image]
 
Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
Got this what looks like military issue rifle grease 30+ years ago at a gun show. No MIL-SPEC info on the container. Who knows how old it was when I bought it. It's stayed the same consistancy and hasn't solidified at all since I got it. It's very thin and works very well on slide rails. Just takes a small amount, and I use a toothpick to apply a thin layer. Wish I could find more someplace. [Linked Image] [Linked Image]
NSN 9150-248-3480
 
^^^ Yep, that looks to be the same military grease. Wonder who made that stuff back in the 70s ... it seems to stand the test of time. I'm sure there is better gun grease out there these days, but I continue to use this stuff on pistol slide rails and works great.
 
i clean with hoppes (barrel) and also use the lucas oil CLP aerosol for cleaning, but for the rails i use the lucas oil gun oil. it's pretty thick and doesn't migrate like some oils. i clean and lube after every range trip
 
Any grease will generally be better than no grease, but most of my firearms run on no grease just fine. Why not use an automotive grease if you prefer? I've never seen a grease that was so stiff that it prevented any of my firearms from functioning properly.

Those who live & work & subsist in the Arctic would take exception to this post; however, I don’t doubt it is applicable in your region of the World.
 
Does anyone use Weapon Shield gun grease?
Weapon Shield Lithium Grease is pretty much my "go to" firearms grease now. I've tried a ton of them, along with a lot of the automotive type greases. Weapon Shield doesn't seem to attract as much crap as many of the others do. It works really well on AR-15 / AK-47 bolt lugs, and the hinge bearing surfaces on O/U shotguns.

Another "in between" lube that clings better than a lot of the "gun oils", but doesn't have the "solidness" of grease are both 600 wt. oil, and Break Free LP. (Notice "LP", NOT "CLP"). It is strictly for lubrication, and doesn't contain any cleaning solvents. And it has a bit more body, and isn't as runny as the CLP products tend to be. It's bit harder to find, but places like Midway have it. It's a good rust inhibitor as well.

600 wt. oil is used in the differential and transmissions of a lot of older classic cars. It really stays where you put it. The stuff works really well in other applications as well. Like the coil springs on garage doors. A lot of live steam model railroaders use it on their steam locomotives, because it stays put so well. It won't drip off like a lot of other oils will. A quart will last all but a lifetime.


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I've used Schaeffer's 221 #2 for years, works just fine. I've fired thousands of rounds through pistols & rifles lubricated with this stuff, never had a problem, even though it's a bit thick, use sparingly as too much of any grease only attracts dirt. Great corrosion protector too, even my daily carry pistol hasn't corroded despite years in my sweaty waistband. It's my all-purpose grease I use for bicycles & cars too, so I always have it around.
 
... 600 wt. oil is used in the differential and transmissions of a lot of older classic cars. It really stays where you put it. The stuff works really well in other applications as well. ...
Another oil good for many applications is chainsaw bar & chain oil. It's typically 70 to 90 weight gear oil with a tackifier agent to reduce sling-off and stay where it's put. A gallon costs about $13 at any hardware store.
 
Sta-Lube SL3151 White and Lubriplate are the best grease I have ever used on firearms.

Be cautious with Lubriplate. It comes in 2 formula's. One is petroleum based. The other is a biodegradable food grade. If you have the latter be sure to store it in a cool, dry place. A hot garage will allow it to go rancid in no time. Personally, I avoid ANY type of food grade grease or lubricant for firearms. It has gummed up A LOT of good weapons over time. The petroleum grade of Lubriplate is good to go for most any application.
 
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Got this what looks like military issue rifle grease 30+ years ago at a gun show. No MIL-SPEC info on the container. Who knows how old it was when I bought it. It's stayed the same consistancy and hasn't solidified at all since I got it. It's very thin and works very well on slide rails. Just takes a small amount, and I use a toothpick to apply a thin layer. Wish I could find more someplace.

5 for $6.95 plus $4.25 shipping.
 
I have used supertech red and marine grease for years. I had a firing pin gum up when it was bitter cold when i tried to shoot a deer last year, whether it was cleaning it out or using 5w20 oil that helped i may never know. But either way these things seem to run with any sort of lube you want to use.
 
I really like the breakfree CLP and LP products. I know they got a bad rep a few years back but ever since they returned to mil-spec they have been working very well for me. The LP is significantly tackier than the CLP. As for grease, Jet-Lube offers a lot of different products. I would be they have a low # grease for you. I think valvoline greases are made in multiple weights, but I've never seen anything but #2 on the shelf.

Check out their “collector” if you want tacky!
 
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