My firearms should be greased or not question…..for the experts….

Well, it often happens with my collection guns that see shooting and cleaning less that once per year. This is with WeaponsShield which has been better than others like Hoppes oil or Rem oil.
I would probably stop using those then, since you know what happens with them.
 
Grease gets a bad rap because most people think you put it on with a grease gun and you have to be able to see the grease for it to really be there. If the grease is on any heavier than your oil then its too thick. I use moly grease with an artist paint brush on the back of AR bolts and the locking lugs of bolt actions, the slides of 1911's and the bolt and raceways of M1's and M1A's. a different grease for aluminum framed steel slide guns. Bicycle chain wax on polymer framed guns. But it all has to be very very light applications, heavy grease or heavy application either rubs off or collects dust and fouling. But I also never run my guns to failure before cleaning which seems to be a thing nowadays, I cant count the times a guy on the line will ask if I have oil because he just put 500 rnd through his AR and its running dry or he oiled it a couple months ago when he put it away but now its malfunctioning.
 
With firearms, as is with most things, it depends on the use. Some firearms require grease, while other require oil. Most do not call out by name, a specific brand of oil to use, or a weight.

-CZ for instance specifically calls for Ballistol in many of their manuals, both semi auto and bolt actions.
-MIL-G-46003 was the spec for the M1 Garand, Lubriplate 130A, which is the correct lube for the bolt and roller.
-Kalashnikov rifles required an "Alkali solution" and "lubricating oil"
-M-16 rifles today require "CLP" in the regular army.

Semi-auto firearms for example, while operating on many of the same principles, do better or worse with grease or oil or both, depending on the operating conditions, ammo, temperature, contamination, etc.

Some semi-autos will get "slowed" by thicker grease, even in warm temps, while other seemingly do not care about the oil.

Typically I use a combination of the two, grease and oil.....grease at the areas from which will see higher temps and forces, and oil in the pins and springs.

There is no right or wrong answer to the question.

Some guns are picky, I would argue that the AK for example likes grease, as it is very violent, as do rifles like the M1 Garand, from which the AK and some others were derived.

While some like Glock pistols, require only light oil.

Pump shotguns, really dont require either.

Shooting corrosive ammo can change the "requirement" for lube also. Which is why the old Soviet manual call for an Alkali solution.

All in all, with exception to the AR, and any delayed roller lockback system, (which require "wet operation") a light coating of oil on pins and springs, and a light grease in locking and sliding surfaces is sufficient for the life of the gun.
 
@nksmfamjp - it might help to know on what firearm you’re considering these various products. Most of the guns I own run great on just about anything, but for the M1 Garands, which are both relatively valuable and historic, I do run grease.

I use Mobil 1, as the red color allows me to see the coat thickness, and I don’t put on too much - rather than the Lubriplate 130-A that many collectors use.

On my M+M M10X, which is similar to an AK in bolt design and operation, I use a light grease. The manual says you can use anything, but the TW-25B, which is quite light, stays put.
 
... Typically I use a combination of the two, grease and oil.....grease at the areas from which will see higher temps and forces, and oil in the pins and springs. ...
Same here. Slides on semi-auto pistols, the bolt & rails on an M1, etc. I use a #1 (moderate-light viscosity) grease like Schaeffer's 221 #1. Other applications like pins and springs, an oil. In both cases (grease or oil) I prefer ones that have a tackifier agent to help it stay in place.

A little goes a long way. Too much grease or oil can be counterproductive as it attracts dust, dirt and other contaminants. It doesn't take much.
 
In the good old smelly days, they used animal fats like bear fat as gun lube. I suppose there was a nerdy group of fatheads sitting around the campfire expounding on lubricating properties and gun maintenance. 🤣
 
In the good old smelly days, they used animal fats like bear fat as gun lube. I suppose there was a nerdy group of fatheads sitting around the campfire expounding on lubricating properties and gun maintenance. 🤣
I would say them there days, not much lube would have been needed anyway.
 
What would one lube on a muzzleloader?
Not much, unless using black powder and wanted to stop barrel from rusting.

Trigger?

Some modern muzzleloaders are break action, with a breach-plug that could use some from time to time.......but I think in "them there" days, they would not want much oil in the barrel....for obvious reasons.

Never heard the bear fat oil thing....I dont doubt it, but have no idea.
 
I have a Glock 17, and I oil the gun per the manual. Figured they engineered the weapon and know it better than I do. So I go by their recommendation.
 
Anything is better than nothing. It’s easy to overthink this. You can mix grease with motor oil to get the desired consistency. Odds are most modern synthetic motor oils are far, far better than most gun lubes.

I have used Cherrybalms, Hoppes, MPro, countless others. They all pretty much work. Grease is great for certain applications, not others. I have seen it cause cycling issues. Moral of the story: Use what works in your firearm.

I have a Glock 17, and I oil the gun per the manual. Figured they engineered the weapon and know it better than I do. So I go by their recommendation.
FWIW, Glocks come with copper grease applied from the factory.
 
Anything is better than nothing. It’s easy to overthink this. You can mix grease with motor oil to get the desired consistency. Odds are most modern synthetic motor oils are far, far better than most gun lubes.

I have used Cherrybalms, Hoppes, MPro, countless others. They all pretty much work. Grease is great for certain applications, not others. I have seen it cause cycling issues. Moral of the story: Use what works in your firearm.


FWIW, Glocks come with copper grease applied from the factory.
Yeah I know. But this is a Gen 2 Glock, that grease is LONG gone LOL
 
I have been using a homemade concoction of Mobil1 grease and 5w30 oil mixed to come out of a squeeze bottle.
It has been working great for many years. I normally apply it with a Q-tip. My guns have never run so well.
I do notice that it's still there when I clean after a range day. Store-bought gun oils were long gone for the most part.
 
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