TGMO 0w20 for tubrocharged cars too!

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That's not TGMO, the holy grail of BITOG oils, the one made by Mobil, utilising amongst other things, trinuclear moly (well it's guessed as using it) That's the made in Japan TGMO, which isn't the Mobil made stuff. http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/3248718/Re:_TGMO_0W-20_-_FAQ#Post3248718 The aficionados have yet to be able to tell me who made the oil in that thread, and what it consists of, nor which Toyota engines were designed specifically around 4-5L of it.
 

Bloodknights

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Weird ..thought no matter who makes the oil for Toyota would make it according to there specs.so if they make in Japan one way why wouldn't they make it the same for USA ..
 
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Given that it was specifically designed for the Prius and the Tundra, I would have thought that all would have been the same also. There was a story that the additive package was shipped to Mobil at one stage, pretty sure that was just a story 'though.
 
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Originally Posted By: Bloodknights
Weird ..thought no matter who makes the oil for Toyota would make it according to there specs.so if they make in Japan one way why wouldn't they make it the same for USA ..
I figure it's probably the same as German castrol vs American castrol.
 
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Originally Posted By: Bloodknights
Weird ..thought no matter who makes the oil for Toyota would make it according to there specs.so if they make in Japan one way why wouldn't they make it the same for USA ..
You're right, TGMO 0W-20 is basically the same product no matter if it's made by Mobil USA, Mobil Europe or Nippon Oil. That means the same very high nominal 215 VI, same grade minimum 2.6cP HTHSV and similar high AW additive levels. And while TGMO 0W-20 will likely be the oil spec'd for the turbo 4 in the new Lexus SUV, FUCHS of Germany already makes a 0W-20 that's approved for the existing BMW N20 turbo 4. I haven't seen the spec's on the FUCHS oil yet but I suspect it will be somewhat heavier than the very light TGMO 0W-20.
 
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Originally Posted By: abycat
The mrs is supercharged. I think that is what is called.
I think the only time they supercharged that car was back in the 1980s. They called it the MR2 SC. I think Toyota put factory superchargers on other cars, but the only one I can remember is the Previa SC. As for turbo engines in the past, does this mean the Supra, SW20 MR2, 22RE-T trucks, and Celica All-Trac work well with TGMO?
 
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Originally Posted By: Shannow
There was a story that the additive package was shipped to Mobil at one stage, pretty sure that was just a story 'though.
Here is the TGMO I buy at my dealer: And here is a detail on that label: If it's just a story, what are the imported components referenced on the label? shrug
 
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Originally Posted By: richport29
A TGMO 0W30 would be perfect for me. Come on Toyota make it happen smile
It won't likely ever happen now that the 0W-20 grade has been found to be more than robust enough for even new turbo applications. So if you want a very high VI 0W-30 I think the only option for the foreseeable future is to blend your own; i.e., TGMO 0W-20/M1 0W-40. Even Nippon Oil, who first developed the TGMO 0W-20 and are committed to the concept of very high VI oils don't make a 0W-30. They do make a 194 VI 5W-30 in their premium Sustina brand but again if you want a 200+ VI 0W-30 you're going to have to blend it yourself from their Sustina 0W-20 and 0W-50 grades.
 
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That's assuming of course that the Cold Cranking specs remain 0W when blending two zeros...something that while we've discussed, has never been clearly demonstrated.
 
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It's only you with nothing to base it on that would even suggest that blending two 0W oils would somehow produce an oil heavier than the heaviest constituent. When I spoke to Mobil about blending their various 0W oils, the only question regarding the final MRV value was that it would be at some point between the two values and not necessarily based on the proportion of each oil of the blend.
 
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Originally Posted By: CATERHAM
It's only you with nothing to base it on that would even suggest that blending two 0W oils would somehow produce an oil heavier than the heaviest constituent. When I spoke to Mobil about blending their various 0W oils, the only question regarding the final MRV value was that it would be at some point between the two values and not necessarily based on the proportion of each oil of the blend.
As you may well realise, an oil, in a blend is not a "constituent", it is a complete oil in it's own right, made up of a bunch of individual components...each of which is reduced in concentration by a half (in a 50:50 blend). Do each of the additives perform linearly (and cumulatively) at 50% of the original treat rate ? That is your (untested, yet again) assertion, and the reason that I raised it. I note your statement that it's blending "their" various 0W oils, not randomly mixing someone else's oils. Yes, I can see that if M1 use the same basic additive chemistry for all of their 0Ws, you end up with pretty much the same percentage of the same polymers, or a linear change in polymer/base-stock viscosity...it's reasonable to assume that you are somewhere in the middle. Doesn't automatically lead (posit, assertion, or even assumption) that it is true when differing polymers are used
 
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Originally Posted By: Shannow
Originally Posted By: CATERHAM
It's only you with nothing to base it on that would even suggest that blending two 0W oils would somehow produce an oil heavier than the heaviest constituent. When I spoke to Mobil about blending their various 0W oils, the only question regarding the final MRV value was that it would be at some point between the two values and not necessarily based on the proportion of each oil of the blend.
As you may well realise, an oil, in a blend is not a "constituent", it is a complete oil in it's own right, made up of a bunch of individual components...each of which is reduced in concentration by a half (in a 50:50 blend). Do each of the additives perform linearly (and cumulatively) at 50% of the original treat rate ? That is your (untested, yet again) assertion, and the reason that I raised it. I note your statement that it's blending "their" various 0W oils, not randomly mixing someone else's oils. Yes, I can see that if M1 use the same basic additive chemistry for all of their 0Ws, you end up with pretty much the same percentage of the same polymers, or a linear change in polymer/base-stock viscosity...it's reasonable to assume that you are somewhere in the middle. Doesn't automatically lead (posit, assertion, or even assumption) that it is true when differing polymers are used
There you go again obfuscating your own ridiculous suggestion unapologetically attempting to high-jack this thread in the process.
 
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Originally Posted By: CATERHAM
Originally Posted By: Shannow
Originally Posted By: CATERHAM
It's only you with nothing to base it on that would even suggest that blending two 0W oils would somehow produce an oil heavier than the heaviest constituent. When I spoke to Mobil about blending their various 0W oils, the only question regarding the final MRV value was that it would be at some point between the two values and not necessarily based on the proportion of each oil of the blend.
As you may well realise, an oil, in a blend is not a "constituent", it is a complete oil in it's own right, made up of a bunch of individual components...each of which is reduced in concentration by a half (in a 50:50 blend). Do each of the additives perform linearly (and cumulatively) at 50% of the original treat rate ? That is your (untested, yet again) assertion, and the reason that I raised it. I note your statement that it's blending "their" various 0W oils, not randomly mixing someone else's oils. Yes, I can see that if M1 use the same basic additive chemistry for all of their 0Ws, you end up with pretty much the same percentage of the same polymers, or a linear change in polymer/base-stock viscosity...it's reasonable to assume that you are somewhere in the middle. Doesn't automatically lead (posit, assertion, or even assumption) that it is true when differing polymers are used
There you go again obfuscating your own ridiculous suggestion unapologetically attempting to high-jack this thread in the process.
Its a stretch to assume, as Shamwow has, that VI polymers would somehow cancel out or mutually interfere. Until someone shows this to be true, why raise this? Bring the evidence, or shut up. Throwing things out there doesn't cut it around here.
 
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