rivian r1t electric pick-up

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A bit pertinent with the discussion on electrifying the F series.... https://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/rivian-r1t-electric-pickup-truck/
Quote
When startups plan a new electric car, they tend to follow Tesla's lead with a luxury model. But Rivian is taking electric vehicles in a more rugged direction. At the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show, Rivian is launching the R1T, an all-electric pickup truck with up to 400 miles of range, and the ability to accelerate from zero to 60 mph in 3.0 seconds. The R1T will soon be joined by an SUV called the R1S. The claimed 400-mile range is achieved with a massive 180-kilowatt-hour battery pack. Rivian will also offer 105-kWh and 135-kWh battery-pack options, with 230 miles and 300 miles of range, respectively. You'll need the lighter 135-kWh battery pack to have the quickest R1T, as Rivian claims this version will do zero to 60 mph in 3.0 seconds flat. The longer-range 180-kWh model takes 3.2 seconds, according to Rivian, while the 105-kWh version requires 4.9 seconds to reach 60 mph. Each battery pack comes with a different power output: the top 180-kWh model has a claimed 700 horsepower and 826 pound-feet of torque, the 135-kWh version is rated at 745 hp and 826 lb-ft, and the 105-kWh variant is rated at 402 hp and 413 lb-ft.
https://products.rivian.com/
 
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Exciting developments, but seems a bit far from actual production. Sales will be interesting as well. I am interested to see how Tesla does once other mfgrs enter the electric market....
 

Shannow

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notice that no-one (at least I can find) is prepared to offer the maximum loaded range...be the first to the headlines of soccer mom versus short haul tradesman. Quick question SteveSRT8...what's the pumping and heating load on one of your service trucks ???
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted by Shannow
Quick question SteveSRT8...what's the pumping and heating load on one of your service trucks ???
Good question for a niche application. Reality is that fuel or wall plug electrification will always be necessary for intense applications. Better example is hybrid cars. When there's a call for cabin heat, and you're short tripping (where hybrids shine), you can observe a 50% fuel economy loss over a similar trip where the engine isn't commanded to operate. And hybrid mode still works. If my 50+ mpg hybrid returns 25-35 on the specific short trips, just think how much poorer the standard IC engine in the same car in the same trip is? But go one step further. Tesla has, iirc, a 4kW PTC heater in its cabin. So if it's truly cold and the cabin lossy, you could lose 4kWh for every hour of highway cruising. The rule of thumb I was given sometime back was 800Wh/mi for a generic ev. But on here, it seems like they're much better... like 200-300Wh/mi! But think of that... Tesla going 60 mph, consuming 15kWh to go 60 mi at 60mph... then turn on your heater for an hour - you could be doing 25% worse! My hybrid does 50% worse on very short trips. Emphasis short trips - it wouldn't have a sustained penalty in the cold...
 

CT8

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Different vehicles for different applications. Electric vehicles have their applications.
 
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Originally Posted by Shannow
notice that no-one (at least I can find) is prepared to offer the maximum loaded range...be the first to the headlines of soccer mom versus short haul tradesman. Quick question SteveSRT8...what's the pumping and heating load on one of your service trucks ???
If you are questioning the stationary operations the HP used is about 35 or so, varying due to load. Heat would be the issue, we can't even use diesels as they won't generate enough heat for up to 5 gpm of 200 degree water. No electric can heat water like a 6 liter V8 can! The routes we run are short enough but the application requires a fossil fuel powered heater. That can be propane, diesel oil, etc., or a compact heat exchanger like we use that cools our engine while it heats our water. For an interesting spec our water tank was 45 degrees today and our output was 195-200 degrees continuously. That would take a TON of battery power!
 
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