Audi A1 e-Tron revealed w/ Wankel engine.

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
11,247
Location
PA
http://www.worldcarfans.com/110030224842/audi-a1-e-tron-revealed Audi used the Geneva Motor Show as a platform not only to show off the A1, but also to introduce the Audi A1 e-tron. The small car expands the e-tron brand for Audi, and is capable of running on electric power alone, making use of a combustion engine as a generator. Engineers selected an electric motor that produces up to 75 kW for propulsion, which is transversely-mounted at the front of the vehicle. The motor's continuous output hovers around 45 kW, though quick boosts are possible for short periods of time. The motor puts out 150 Nm (111 lb-ft) of torque continuously, with peak torque rated at 240 Nm (177 lb-ft). The motor is powered by a T-shaped 12 kW lithium-ion battery pack installed below the floor of the vehicle, which weighs just under 150 kilograms (331 lbs). All-electric range is rated at 50 kilometers (31 miles), with a 254 cc single-rotor engine recharging the battery as needed. The small Wankel engine is installed under the luggage compartment, and combines with the generator, cooling unit, exhaust, insulation, intake, and subframe for a bit over 70 kilograms (154 lbs). Weight does not include the car's 12-liter (3 gallon US) fuel tank. Audi claims their range extender system is an intelligent model that works with the car's GPS system. If the driver programs a destination for the navigation system, it will automatically choose the most efficient time to use the generator and engine. The range extender can also be turned on manually by using a push button mounted below the single-speed gear selector. The 1,190 kg (2623 lbs) car is only capable of a sluggish 0-100 km/h sprint of 10.2 seconds. Not surprisingly, Audi is marketing this concept as a "Mega City Vehicle." With a top speed of only 130 km/h (81 mph), the vehicle would be a poor choice for people who commute to work from the suburbs. Still, with a full range of about 250 km (155 miles), the car is more than capable of occasional longer distance travel. Those who pay attention to their vehicle's direct emissions will be pleased with the 45 grams of CO2 released per kilometer the extended range engine is in use. Audi claims fuel consumption is rated at about 1.9 liters of fuel per 100 km (123.8 mpg US / 148.6 mpg imp). Efficiency is helped by the electro-mechanical power steering and regenerative brakes. Audi A1 e-tron – electric driving in the city The new e-tron model series from Audi will gain another new member at the Geneva Motor Show: The Audi A1 e-tron is a Mega City Vehicle (MCV) with an innovative drive technology. It comes equipped with a powerful electric motor for zero-emission driving in the city. There is also an internal combustion engine on board that recharges the battery in exceptional circumstances. The A1 e-tron is very agile thanks to the 75 kW (102 hp) peak power of its electric motor. The technology of the Audi A1 e-tron The e-tron model family from Audi is just a few months old, but it already has a number of members, for each of which Audi has chosen a different drive technology. The first e-tron, which debuted at the 2009 IAA in Frankfurt/Main, is a near-series high-performance sports car with electric motors for all four wheels. The study shown at the Detroit Motor Show in 2010 is a lightweight, compact two-seater with two electric motors on the rear axle. The A1 e-tron now presents another approach – a compact electric car in the premium class. The four-passenger, two-door MCV city car was designed specifically for use in the metropolitan areas of Europe and North America and in the rapidly growing megacities of Asia and South America. The Audi A1 e-tron always drives on electric power; its internal combustion engine is only used to recharge the battery in isolated cases. The integration of the new technologies shows the holistic approach that Audi is pursuing with electric mobility. The objective is to use the energy with the lowest possible losses. The precise interaction of the components, their intelligent packaging, and the efficient management of the current flows are the product of the expertise that the company has developed in this area. Audi has developed a proprietary thermal management system to keep the battery, the electric motor, and the power electronics within their respective ideal temperature windows. Behind the three e-tron models is a broadly diverse and modular technology platform that continues to grow very rapidly as Audi drives development forward. The electric motor: 75 kW (102 hp) peak power The synchronous electric motor of the Audi A1 e-tron is mounted transversely at the front of the car. Its low mounting position has a positive effect on the vehicle’s center of gravity. Continuous output is rated at 45 kW (61 hp), with peak power of 75 kW (102 hp) available in short bursts. 150 Nm (110.63 lb-ft) of torque is continuously available, and peak torque is 240 Nm (177.01 lb-ft). The electric motor sends its power to the front wheels via a single-speed transmission. The elegant, retractable selector lever on the console of the center tunnel used to choose between “Drive,” “Reverse,” and “Neutral” was taken from the first Audi e-tron. The power electronics are mounted in the engine compartment above the electric motor. The most important components are the pulse-controlled inverter, which serves as the controller between the electric motor and the battery; the DC converter, which connects the high-voltage network with the 14 volt electrical system; a breaker unit to protect the high-voltage components; and the charging module. The socket for the standard charging plug is located behind the rings in the single-frame grille of the Audi A1 e-tron. A fully depleted battery can be recharged in approximately three hours from the 380 volt grid. A display immediately adjacent to the plug-in connection shows the current charge status and the charging time remaining. The concept of the innovative Mega City Vehicle requires the electrification of key auxiliaries. The refrigerant compressor of the climate control system, for example, is electrically powered by a high-voltage electric motor that supplies only the amount of power needed at the time. This increases system efficiency substantially compared to conventional concepts. Thanks to a special circuit, the climate control loop also functions as a heat pump that regulates the temperature of the cabin and the battery. The power steering of the Audi A1 e-tron is electro-mechanical and thus particularly energy-efficient. An electronic brake system makes it possible to tap into the recuperation potential of the electric motors. A hydraulic fixed-caliper brake is mounted on the front axle, with two novel electrically-actuated floating-caliper brakes mounted on the rear axle. These floating calipers are actuated not by any mechanical or hydraulic transfer elements, but rather by wire (“brake by wire”). In addition, this eliminates frictional losses due to residual slip when the brakes are not being applied. In addition, the servo unit received a new, demand-controlled electric vacuum pump. The large electric motor powering the A1 e-tron can convert braking energy into electric current and feed it back into the electrical system. The high degree of recuperation benefits overall efficiency. The electric control actions are imperceptible to the driver, who notices only the familiar, precise, and perfectly controllable pedal feel. The battery pack: a compact T arranged below the floor The energy storage unit is arranged below the floor, where it is ideal for the center of gravity and weight distribution. The battery pack is shaped like a T, with the short “transverse beam” filling the rear section of the center tunnel and the “cross-beam” filling that area in front of the rear axle where the fuel tank is otherwise located. The 380 volt lithium-ion rechargeable battery has a nominal energy content of 12 kilowatt hours. It comprises 96 prismatic cells and weighs less than 150 kilograms (330.69 lb). The Audi A1 e-tron can drive 50 kilometers (31.07 miles) emission-free in city traffic on the powerful battery. On longer trips, the battery is recharged by a particularly compact internal combustion engine mounted below the luggage compartment. The range extender The A1 e-tron concept car has a Wankel engine as a range extender, but other compact concepts are also possible. The small single-rotor Wankel has a chamber volume of 254 cc and runs at a constant 5,000 rpm in its peak efficiency window. The electronics also consider navigation data such as the destination and route profile to automatically activate the range extender as needed. The driver can also turn the range extender on and off as necessary with the push of a button The fuel tank holds 12 liters (3.17 US gallons). The great strengths of the Wankel engine are the nearly vibration-free and quiet operation, the small dimensions, and the extremely low weight. Together with the generator, which is powered by the Wankel engine and produces 15 kW of electric power, the complete assembly weighs only around 70 kilograms (154.32 lb). This weight also includes the special power electronics, the intake, exhaust, and cooling unit, plus the insulation and the subframe. Driving experience The first defining impression that the driver of the Audi A1 e-tron gets is that of nearly total silence. Even the Wankel engine in the back can barely be heard when it is running. The second characteristic perception is the power of the electric motor, nearly all of which is available instantly and thrusts the Audi A1 e-tron forward with authority. The innovative Mega City Vehicle, which despite its complex drive technology weighs only 1,190 kilograms (2,623.50 lb) delivers zero-emission driving fun in a modern and sophisticated manner. The vehicle accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h (62.14 mph) in 10.2 seconds and has a top speed of more than 130 km/h (80.78 mph). The Audi A1 e-tron can also cover longer distances if the range extender charges the battery. The extra range, which is intended primarily for interurban driving, is 200 kilometers (124.27 miles). According to the draft standard, the two different operating modes yield a fuel consumption of only 1.9 l/100 km (123.80 US mpg), which corresponds to CO2 emissions of 45 g/km (72.42 g/mile). In electric mode, there are zero local CO2 emissions - the compact A1 e-tron is thus ecological and economical. The third impression that the A1 e-tron makes is that of a larger car. The compact two-door boasts all of the strengths of the new A1 model series – the carefully tuned, sporty chassis with specially designed 18 inch alloy wheels and 215/35 R18 tires; the generous, “grown-up” interior; the excellent fit and finish; and a multitude of high-end equipment. The dark shade “ebony” dominates the interior. The seats – with stone gray seams – and the headliner are in “Alabaster White". Design The concept car in Geneva has a special “Aqua Mint, pearl effect” paint finish; the contrasting roof arch is offset in “High Gloss Steel dark.” As with the other two e-tron models, the 18-inch wheels with a 20-spoke turbine design convey the high-tech aspiration of the concept. The rear diffuser with aluminum trim lacks tailpipes. This emphasizes the width of the vehicle and suggests the low emissions. The two front fenders are emblazoned with the “e-tron” logo. The “Aqua Mint, pearl effect” exterior color carries over into the interior, where it adorns the door panels and the center console. The shift lever is a special leather-wrapped design; as is typical for the e-tron models, the start-stop button was placed in the front of the center console. A specially designed battery cover at the front of the car and the range extender engine with its cooling fins displayed under a sheet of glass in the luggage compartment also serve to visually underscore the clean technology of the A1 e-tron. And because an innovative drive concept also calls for innovative information management, the concept car features a freely programmable instrument cluster with a virtual display surface and innovative display and operating concept.
 

Audi Junkie

Thread starter
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
11,247
Location
PA
An expert in the unknown? You forgot the part about German cars "typically" outperforming and outlasting cars of other origins.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
5,153
Location
MW
I think German cars are reliable vehicles. Typically they have 2-3 times as many features as other cars so chances of something going wrong are increased.
 
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
1,513
Location
Peterborough
Originally Posted By: CivicFan
I think German cars are reliable vehicles. Typically they have 2-3 times as many features as other cars so chances of something going wrong are increased.
I've been down this road before, and completely agree. They do struggle with some reliability issues for relatively simple problems, BUT overall the cars ARE reliable. My friend and Uncle both drive BMW 3 series cars. Theyve been excellent all around. The Audi A3 has excellent reliability ratings overall. Even after several years of use. What I DONT like about the german stuff is their over engineering on occasion. I've spent a good number of days/ evenings/ weekends working on BM'rs Audis and older Porsches. Some designs are very well thought out, and some..............Audi's hydraulic door lock cylindars, or RUDELY complex front suspension on the '90s A4's......not so much. Not to say they arent terrific cars to drive!
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 12, 2003
Messages
7,829
Location
Oklahoma
Why the rotary engine? Notorious for being a big polluter or it would be used by a lot of manufacturers. Also a notorious oil burner. Wonder if they found a fix for the dreaded apex seal failures.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
1,588
Location
FL
Originally Posted By: Schmoe
Wonder if they found a fix for the dreaded apex seal failures.
They already did. They took the driver out of the equation.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
5,153
Location
MW
Originally Posted By: Schmoe
Why the rotary engine? Notorious for being a big polluter or it would be used by a lot of manufacturers. Also a notorious oil burner. Wonder if they found a fix for the dreaded apex seal failures.
From what's written, it seems that the rotary engine is the best available choice. At 255 CC capacity, it's probably an easy swap if something goes wrong.
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2003
Messages
38,615
Location
ME
Retractable shifter, push button ignition, and partial brake-by-wire? Given current events, a little scary.
 

Kestas

Staff member
Joined
Jun 4, 2002
Messages
14,220
Location
The Motor City
Originally Posted By: Audi Junkie
With a top speed of only 130 km/h (81 mph), the vehicle would be a poor choice for people who commute to work from the suburbs.
My 57 Chevy (L6, powerglide transmission) had a top speed of 80 mph. It never stopped me from getting where I wanted to go.
Originally Posted By: CivicFan
I think German cars are reliable vehicles. Typically they have 2-3 times as many features as other cars so chances of something going wrong are increased.
It is because of these features and their integration with basic systems that makes German cars unreliable.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
5,153
Location
MW
Originally Posted By: Kestas
Originally Posted By: CivicFan
I think German cars are reliable vehicles. Typically they have 2-3 times as many features as other cars so chances of something going wrong are increased.
It is because of these features and their integration with basic systems that makes German cars unreliable.
Quirky would be a more appropriate word. For example, I have read a post by an owner when the parking brake was engaged in an A6 and the ignition sensor went bad. The parking brake is an electronically controlled device and the car could not be rolled out of the garage (I am guessing it's an anti-theft feature) to be towed to the dealer and they had to drag the car out. So it's not 'unreliable' per se but a pain in the a$$ - you would think that there would be an easy way to override this integration.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2009
Messages
2,371
Location
WA
Originally Posted By: Schmoe
Why the rotary engine? Notorious for being a big polluter or it would be used by a lot of manufacturers. Also a notorious oil burner. Wonder if they found a fix for the dreaded apex seal failures.
Rotary engines are designed to burn oil for lubrication. Mazda made the apex seals reliable by 1978 when the first RX-7s came out. Rotary engines are extremely reliable, and can burn many types of fuels. They do however lack efficiency (ie, fuel mileage) compared to a piston engine in the same HP category. Thier emissions have been improved greatly in the last 5~10 years.
 
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
1,513
Location
Peterborough
Brake by wire in an Audi............no thanks. They just DON'T have the electrical gremlins down well enough for me to trust them with this. No one can argue that. I'm not bashing the brand entirely. They make some of the best looking cars on the road right now IMO. They also drive beautifully. If they corrected their electronics, they'd be at the top of my list.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
10,943
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: SuperBusa
Originally Posted By: Schmoe
Why the rotary engine? Notorious for being a big polluter or it would be used by a lot of manufacturers. Also a notorious oil burner. Wonder if they found a fix for the dreaded apex seal failures.
Rotary engines are designed to burn oil for lubrication. Mazda made the apex seals reliable by 1978 when the first RX-7s came out. Rotary engines are extremely reliable, and can burn many types of fuels. They do however lack efficiency (ie, fuel mileage) compared to a piston engine in the same HP category. Thier emissions have been improved greatly in the last 5~10 years.
Also its seems to produce about 25hp which isn't too shabby, 100hp/L. A 250cc single piston engine that tuned up wouldn't normally be very smooth or long lasting.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2009
Messages
2,371
Location
WA
Originally Posted By: IndyIan
Also its seems to produce about 25hp which isn't too shabby, 100hp/L. A 250cc single piston engine that tuned up wouldn't normally be very smooth or long lasting.
Yep ... rotary engines can make BIG HP for their displacement. How about this one? ... one word ... "insane". wink http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BGGBU2Lpyo
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2006
Messages
465
Location
Ft Lauderdale Fl
Originally Posted By: CivicFan
Originally Posted By: Schmoe
Why the rotary engine? Notorious for being a big polluter or it would be used by a lot of manufacturers. Also a notorious oil burner. Wonder if they found a fix for the dreaded apex seal failures.
From what's written, it seems that the rotary engine is the best available choice. At 255 CC capacity, it's probably an easy swap if something goes wrong.
I suspect it's probably a Rotax ...
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Messages
43,666
Location
'Stralia
wankels were used a lot as auxilliary power units. In fixed load/speed applications, a lot of their shortcomings are bypassed.
 
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
10,943
Location
Ontario, Canada
There were wankel snowmobiles in the 70's. My local sled mechanic had one but I never saw/heard it run. A wankel chainsaw too from that era. Both need to run well in only a relatively small rev range.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top