One torque wrench for 5-125 ft lbs?

Messages
8,145
Location
MI
I see that OP has provided that... What in an automobile is so sensitive that calibration with the head at an angle is actually important? I’d think that consistency if anything would be more important. What items need that type of accuracy?
Isn't that SnapOn angle calibration for the turning angle measurement, not the flex head angle? I.E., torque to a value, then tighten another 90 degrees?

@Trav - because the electronic wrench displays the increasing torque value as you turn it, would it not be equivalent to a dial type wrench for bearing pre load?
 
Messages
1,610
Location
Ca
Very nice wrench. The nuts I torque don't know if I'm using a Snap-On or HF......keep 'em guessing.
 

The Critic

Thread starter
Messages
24,412
Location
CA
For something like transmission pan bolts at 8-10 ft lbs that would be too bulky and heavy, especially when used over head when you're under the car. I assume the accuracy is because it's electronic, but comfort and convenience comes into play on a tool too. I would grab my 1/4" drive STURTEVANT RICHMONT clicker for low torque applications.

For things like bearing preload clickers and electronics are pretty much useless, a dial type with memory pointer is a the correct and best tool.
These are very good and useful tools.

"To check bearing pre-load and drag, this tool measures rolling torque and includes five scale references in ft-lb, in-lb, nm-cm and dNm. "

(feature referenced on some of the 1/4" and 3/8" models)
 
Messages
24
If you buy good tools....well u get what u pay for. I'm betting one from HF or the like would not be as good:D
the HF ones don't even hold their setting, once you go to wrench with that thing it slips the setting cause the locking nut or whatever it is at the bottom can't hold, completely worthless
 
Messages
2,170
Location
USA
I would think experienced mechanics wouldn’t need a torque wrench very often as their feel is as good. Tightening the same bolts over and day after day has to train something. The only full engine rebuilds I have worked on were with my dad. A Nash six, and a Dodge truck 318. The truck I sold to a neighbor who pulled a camper with it for years, and always said how good the engine was. All torqued by feel. Of course it was all cast iron then, a superior material.
 
Messages
8,936
Location
North Carolina
I would think experienced mechanics wouldn’t need a torque wrench very often as their feel is as good. Tightening the same bolts over and day after day has to train something. The only full engine rebuilds I have worked on were with my dad. A Nash six, and a Dodge truck 318. The truck I sold to a neighbor who pulled a camper with it for years, and always said how good the engine was. All torqued by feel. Of course it was all cast iron then, a superior material.
Experienced mechanics own the correct tools and use them.

You're talking about shade-tree "YouTube Certified" types that have just been lucky.
 
Messages
26,380
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
I would think experienced mechanics wouldn’t need a torque wrench very often as their feel is as good. Tightening the same bolts over and day after day has to train something. The only full engine rebuilds I have worked on were with my dad. A Nash six, and a Dodge truck 318. The truck I sold to a neighbor who pulled a camper with it for years, and always said how good the engine was. All torqued by feel. Of course it was all cast iron then, a superior material.
Not at all, I use a torque wrench quite often especially dealing with aluminum engines and I have been doing this for a lot of years.
I do not possess micrometer fingers or torque wrench hands.
 
Messages
1,852
Location
Laramie, WY
How could you possibly know if you have an issue if you never have the calibration checked???
never had any failures, since using this torque wrench, and the cost of calibration would be the same as I bought it used on Ebay, the track record of no head bolts giving me any issues or any torqued bolts for that matter.

I don't rebuild engines anymore, the cost isn't justified
 
Messages
2,170
Location
USA
Not at all, I use a torque wrench quite often especially dealing with aluminum engines and I have been doing this for a lot of years.
I do not possess micrometer fingers or torque wrench hands.
I bet you do more than you think. Not micrometer fingers, but torque feel. Micrometer is another thing entirely.
 
Messages
891
Location
Reno, NV
never had any failures, since using this torque wrench, and the cost of calibration would be the same as I bought it used on Ebay, the track record of no head bolts giving me any issues or any torqued bolts for that matter.

I don't rebuild engines anymore, the cost isn't justified
You could run a lot of red lights and not get killed, too.
 

The Critic

Thread starter
Messages
24,412
Location
CA
never had any failures, since using this torque wrench, and the cost of calibration would be the same as I bought it used on Ebay, the track record of no head bolts giving me any issues or any torqued bolts for that matter.

I don't rebuild engines anymore, the cost isn't justified
I paid $90 flat rate for snap on to overhaul and calibrate one of my torque wrenches. I heard it is $110 for some of the techangle models.
 
Messages
18,303
Location
Silicon Valley
I would think experienced mechanics wouldn’t need a torque wrench very often as their feel is as good. Tightening the same bolts over and day after day has to train something. The only full engine rebuilds I have worked on were with my dad. A Nash six, and a Dodge truck 318. The truck I sold to a neighbor who pulled a camper with it for years, and always said how good the engine was. All torqued by feel. Of course it was all cast iron then, a superior material.
Experienced baker probably doesn't need a scale either and can bake the same thing again and again blind folded.

That doesn't means their kitchen won't have a nice scale.
 
Top