One torque wrench for 5-125 ft lbs?

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I purchased a Snap On ATECH2FR125B that is advertised with a 5-125 ft-lb range.

According to the included documentation (which contradicts the website info), this torque wrench’s accuracy is as follows:
6B5B199F-FF21-458A-A14B-4767E7AA5F9C.jpeg
+/- 2% (CW), 20-100% of full scale (from 25-125 ft lbs)
+/- 4% (CW), 4-19% of full scale (from 5-25 ft lbs)

Based on this information, it seems like one torque wrench can be used for all fasteners between 5-125 ft lbs. For comparison, my Precision Instruments split-beam torque wrench is accurate to 4% for its entire usable range.

Also, the included calibration document seems to suggest that the wrench is equally accurate at 25 ft lbs and at 125 ft lbs; I was expecting to see some significant differences.
AF0CDFE7-FB53-4EAE-8DDF-9CC80B0D817A.jpeg
25 ft lbs = 0.8% tolerance
75 ft lbs = 0.0% tolerance
125 ft lbs = 0.1% tolerance

Based on all of this information, can I safely use this torque wrench for everything between 5-125 ft lbs? It just seems hard to believe that one torque wrench can truly handle such a large range.
 
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That looks to be true Mr. Critic. Assuming this was a new feature, I just looked at my 13 year old first generation 1/4 inch Techwrench 240 inch lb. model and it has similar wording (slightly less range at 10 -19% vs. your 5 - 19%).

Guess I failed to read the manual carefully.
Snap on torque Werench.jpg
 
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The Critic

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I think the Icon or Quinn ones were tested not too long ago and it was like 2-4% tolerance.
I think all torque wrenches promise a reasonable accuracy (2-4%) from 20-100% of full scale. The impressive part about this one is the advertised 4% accuracy from 4-19% of scale; usually you are not supposed to use the torque wrench below 20% of scale.
 
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I would still use my 1/4" drive Tech-Angle for anything below 18 foot pounds, It just has better feel & control to it. And I'm going to use my 1/2" drive Tech-Angle for anything above @ 65 foot pounds if space allows.

About to retire my 3/8" drive Tech-Wrench & buy a 3/8" Tech-Angle.
 

The Critic

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I would still use my 1/4" drive Tech-Angle for anything below 18 foot pounds, It just has better feel & control to it. And I'm going to use my 1/2" drive Tech-Angle for anything above @ 65 foot pounds if space allows.

About to retire my 3/8" drive Tech-Wrench & buy a 3/8" Tech-Angle.
For now, the ATECH2FR125 and ATECH2FM100 wrenches are the only ones with Multi-Axis Gyro compensation. Supposedly this feature allows for torque measurement to remain accurate when the head is flexed.

I want the 1/4” and 1/2” Techangles, but will probably wait until they update the hardware on all models.
 
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Hey Critic, I have an old Snap on 3/8" digital torque wrench, which is 5-100 ft*lbs range, it is also an angle wrench and I have never gotten it calibrated as it came calibrated (bought it used) I have rebuilt 99 engines with it and countless other repairs that I had the torque specs on, reusing (recommended in OEM Toyota Repair manual) head bolts as long as they torqued according to Toyota spec, I have never ever had an issue with any torques that I performed using that torque wrench, to this day it works flawlessly.

I'm also very careful, I always take the batteries out when done using it, and I always store it in it's original box, I'm not entirely sure how much that helps but to this day, I have never had any issues.

My point is, snap on's information on accuracy seems to be spot on from my experience.
 
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I've never used this type of torque wrench. If I need angles, I have a separate angle meter that is magnetic and attaches to ratchet. It works for me, but I know it might not be the ideal solution for everyone.

Does the torque wrench let you know if it is about to be overloaded? Say 90 ft-lb plus 60 degrees, which might easily go over 125 ft-lb that it is rated for.
 
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Hey Critic, I have an old Snap on 3/8" digital torque wrench, which is 5-100 ft*lbs range, it is also an angle wrench and I have never gotten it calibrated as it came calibrated (bought it used) I have rebuilt 99 engines with it and countless other repairs that I had the torque specs on, reusing (recommended in OEM Toyota Repair manual) head bolts as long as they torqued according to Toyota spec, I have never ever had an issue with any torques that I performed using that torque wrench, to this day it works flawlessly.

I'm also very careful, I always take the batteries out when done using it, and I always store it in it's original box, I'm not entirely sure how much that helps but to this day, I have never had any issues.

My point is, snap on's information on accuracy seems to be spot on from my experience.
How could you possibly know if you have an issue if you never have the calibration checked???
 

The Critic

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Does the torque wrench let you know if it is about to be overloaded? Say 90 ft-lb plus 60 degrees, which might easily go over 125 ft-lb that it is rated for.
Per the owner's manual, an alert is displayed if you exceed 125% of the full scale. This would be 156.25 ft lbs. The tool also tracks the number of occurrences.

Nice TW! Well worth the money IMO. One thing I do notice though is they do not include a calibration sheet for angle.
They did include one for the angle.
58D154D9-0913-4953-8915-855582DDD802.jpeg
 
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I may try using the gear in my 24 tooth new Proto ratchet to do the 90 degree torque angle when I reinstall the head on my Toyota pickup. Six clicks with pressure on the gear the same direction, and a stop or reference mark for the handle. I bought one of the $7 angle things for the job, not sure that’s as good. Not going to buy something expensive to do a job I will never do again in this life.
 

JHZR2

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Nice TW! Well worth the money IMO. One thing I do notice though is they do not include a calibration sheet for angle.

I see that OP has provided that... What in an automobile is so sensitive that calibration with the head at an angle is actually important? I’d think that consistency if anything would be more important. What items need that type of accuracy?
 
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To be honest nothing in the automotive business requires that sort of accuracy. That level of accuracy is more commonly found in the aviation/aerospace industries where torque tools are certified using labs that are testing for consistency as well as actual accuracy, these tools are connected to pc programs by USB or Bluetooth. Every fastener torqued is stored in the unit and in the app to certify the job.

The certificate that came with your Norbar is a different certificate, it not only confirms accuracy but consistency, this type is also found on high end Stahlwille.
Still, for $600 you want to know the the tool is accurate, $600 is mid tier of high end making the Snap on a really good value.

 
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Based on all of this information, can I safely use this torque wrench for everything between 5-125 ft lbs? It just seems hard to believe that one torque wrench can truly handle such a large range.
For something like transmission pan bolts at 8-10 ft lbs that would be too bulky and heavy, especially when used over head when you're under the car. I assume the accuracy is because it's electronic, but comfort and convenience comes into play on a tool too. I would grab my 1/4" drive STURTEVANT RICHMONT clicker for low torque applications.
 
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