Oil filter sandwich adapter installation.

Messages
10
Location
Seattle, WA
Hi all. I've recently installed an oil filter sandwich adapter on my 2000 Saab 9-5 2.3t to allow me to easily install an oil pressure gauge. Installation when well. No leaks were apparent. When I changed my oil the other day, I almost unscrewed the adapter along with the oil filter and had to re-tighten it. Does anyone know if there is any problem with using Loctite blue or purple (NOT red) to make sure that the adapter plate doesn't unscrew with the oil filter at each oil change? Thanks.
 
Messages
438
Location
USA - Southern California
That's not really a good place to sense oil pressure, since it is measuring before the oil filter (between the pump and the filter). You want to measure oil pressure after the filter.
 
Messages
28,123
Location
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: Skid
That's not really a good place to sense oil pressure, since it is measuring before the oil filter (between the pump and the filter). You want to measure oil pressure after the filter.
Agreed, but it is an easy job that way. What would you recommend if one wanted to install an oil pressure gauge without messing with the OP idiot light? I know there are sandwich adapters that have multiple fittings for those who want pressure and temperature. Has anyone come across a multi fitting for any applications at the original sending unit point, to, say, allow some combination of the original idiot light, a pressure gauge, and a temperature gauge?
 
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2,543
Location
Rochester, MI, US, World
Originally Posted By: Garak
Originally Posted By: Skid
That's not really a good place to sense oil pressure, since it is measuring before the oil filter (between the pump and the filter). You want to measure oil pressure after the filter.
Agreed, but it is an easy job that way. What would you recommend if one wanted to install an oil pressure gauge without messing with the OP idiot light? I know there are sandwich adapters that have multiple fittings for those who want pressure and temperature. Has anyone come across a multi fitting for any applications at the original sending unit point, to, say, allow some combination of the original idiot light, a pressure gauge, and a temperature gauge?
I have, but I can't remember where... It was basically just a "T" or "manifold" with one male pipe thread (that threaded into where the dummy light used to), and 3 other female pipe thread holes for your sending unit(s) and dummy light. Most commonly, I've seen adapters that only allow the use of one additional gauge. But you can find one that lets you add two gauges if you lok hard enough. The only issue could be fitment, since some dummy light sensors are jammed in tight places to start with, let alone room for an adapter.
 
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Messages
28,123
Location
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: Klutch9
I have, but I can't remember where... It was basically just a "T" or "manifold" with one male pipe thread (that threaded into where the dummy light used to), and 3 other female pipe thread holes for your sending unit(s) and dummy light. Most commonly, I've seen adapters that only allow the use of one additional gauge. But you can find one that lets you add two gauges if you lok hard enough. The only issue could be fitment, since some dummy light sensors are jammed in tight places to start with, let alone room for an adapter.
Thanks for that. That's kind of what I thought - such a thing should be possible, but that's only assuming there's actually room for such a piece of plumbing. That's probably why sandwich adapters are popular, too. I'd like to put oil pressure and temperature gauges on my old 1984 F-150. I'd venture that there's more than enough room there, and the idiot light isn't an issue. Goodbye bulb and goodbye problem. For my G, it would be a little more complex. Audi, however, had the sense to put both oil pressure and temperature gauges in my 1991 200 Turbo, with a provision for actually checking the calibration of the things.
 
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2,543
Location
Rochester, MI, US, World
You're welcome. Just as an FYI, on some cars you can completely get rid of your dummy oil pressure sensor and your car will never notice or throw any MILs. On my 2.4L Grand Am, I tested this, since I almost put an actual oil pressure sending unit on for use with a gauge. The reason for this was because I was very tight on space, and adding a "T" wouldn't have been very feasible. So I just disconnected the dummy oil pressure sensor and started the car (didn't unscrew the sensor, just pulled the plug. Didn't want oil spewing everywhere!). The only difference was that I didn't get the oil can light on my dash for the first split second. Evidently the sensor tripped the light only if conditions were right inside, then it would complete the circuit and trip the light. But as far as my car could tell, having an unplugged dummy light sensor was the exact same as having a "safe" oil operating pressure. But if you had an actual sending unit and a good gauge, who cares if that "oil can" light doesn't illuminate... you have an actual gauge, which gives you much better and useful info wink
 
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Messages
2,097
Location
kansastan
Originally Posted By: Klutch9
You're welcome. Just as an FYI, on some cars you can completely get rid of your dummy oil pressure sensor and your car will never notice or throw any MILs. On my 2.4L Grand Am, I tested this, since I almost put an actual oil pressure sending unit on for use with a gauge. The reason for this was because I was very tight on space, and adding a "T" wouldn't have been very feasible. So I just disconnected the dummy oil pressure sensor and started the car (didn't unscrew the sensor, just pulled the plug. Didn't want oil spewing everywhere!). The only difference was that I didn't get the oil can light on my dash for the first split second. Evidently the sensor tripped the light only if conditions were right inside, then it would complete the circuit and trip the light. But as far as my car could tell, having an unplugged dummy light sensor was the exact same as having a "safe" oil operating pressure. But if you had an actual sending unit and a good gauge, who cares if that "oil can" light doesn't illuminate... you have an actual gauge, which gives you much better and useful info wink
IMO it isn't a good idea to disable your 'idiot light' in favor of a gauge. Nobody watches their gauge 100% of the time. And even if you did, there's a good chance that somebody else will be operating your vehicle at some point, and THEY will neither know nor care about something called 'oil pressure'. So while an oil pressure gauge may be fun and informative... it isn't necessarily a very good warning device. IMO the best configuration is to have both a gauge AND a warning light. And with a little creativity, that shouldn't be hard to accomplish. Even if there isn't room to put a tee in a particular spot on a particular engine- one COULD hook up a length of hose, run it to an open location, the install a tee for both the idiot light sensor and the gauge input. That's fairly common in industrial applications.
 
Messages
28,123
Location
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Good views from both of you. I'm generally the only one that operates my vehicle, so I'm not concerned about oil pressure lights working if I have gauges (the Audi has both). I'm more concerned about it being on and bugging me when it shouldn't be. wink I do prefer both working, though. That's the reason I put a voltmeter in the old truck. The idiot light was acting up (i.e. it didn't light when the battery was on its last legs and left me hanging). It was easier to install a voltmeter than to bother with the bulb in the first place. I suppose I could eventually install a temperature gauge, keep the idiot light, and add oil pressure gauges using a multi-fitting and the sandwich adapter to have before and after oil pressure, and really go nuts!
 

KraZ440

Thread starter
Messages
10
Location
Seattle, WA
Thanks for the replies. I guess I should get used to this on this forum: 1 reply which directly answered my question, 7 replies vectoring off in a different direction. smile On my next oil change, I'll add a little Loctite. I understand that the oil filter sandwich is not the ideal place to monitor the pressure, but it is a common solution for my model Saab. I researched the possibilities before deciding on this option. The sensor for the idiot light is located in an out of the way location with very little room and there are no good alternatives in the block.
 
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8,111
Location
MI
Originally Posted By: KraZ440
Thanks for the replies. I guess I should get used to this on this forum: 1 reply which directly answered my question, 7 replies vectoring off in a different direction.
Yea, they recognized you as a newbie here and went easy on you! Welcome to the insanity. In your instance, you will need to pay a bit more attention to getting clean and dry threads since oil might reduce its effectiveness. On a new farm tractor, I once had the entire threaded oil filter mount nipple come off with the first filter change. This could happen to you if you remove the sandwich. But, you simply reinstall the nipple with no complications. Heat can also assist a stubborn removal, even with the blue formula. Another alternative, if feasible, just grab hold of the sandwich with an appropriate wrench while removing the filter with another appropriate tool. Good luck!
 
Messages
28,123
Location
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: KraZ440
Thanks for the replies. I guess I should get used to this on this forum: 1 reply which directly answered my question, 7 replies vectoring off in a different direction.
That's why there are no dumb questions. Your question and the response to it helped clear up something I've been thinking about for a while, too.
 

KraZ440

Thread starter
Messages
10
Location
Seattle, WA
Originally Posted By: Garak
That's why there are no dumb questions. Your question and the response to it helped clear up something I've been thinking about for a while, too.
I'm not frustrated, just amused. It's all been a useful discussion. I did get an answer, which in the end is all I really needed.
Originally Posted By: doitmyself
In your instance, you will need to pay a bit more attention to getting clean and dry threads since oil might reduce its effectiveness.
Thanks for the reminder. To accomplish this, my guess is to wipe it down with some solvent (to cut the oil) and let it dry before applying the Loctite and reassembly.
 
Messages
1,951
Location
New England, USA
Nice car, always a fan of the 9-5 (and 9000) series. I would not use a simple pipe adapter or 'T' fitting at the end of an adapter. Having a typical oil pressure sensor or worse, 2 sensors (gauge and light) cantilevered at the end of a pipe fitting is asking for trouble. I've seen a few failures where the simple adapter pipes fail. I've added pressure gauges using aircraft practice (at least the GA stuff I deal with) which is to run a fitting and quality hose (think Aeroquip or equivalent & long enough to absorb flex) from the port to the sender(s) mounted on the firewall or, if you can, a bracket on the engine. Obviously, watch for heat & anything that could abrade the hose. Also, I'd keep the 'idiot' light, much better at getting your attention. VDO (and others I'm sure) make pressure senders that also have a warning circuit that closes at a specified pressure. Depending on how your SAAB is wired, you could use this to feed the existing idiot light or wire another one, buzzer, etc. I like buzzers...the louder and more irritating the better. Good luck. w
 
Messages
311
Location
Hungary
Originally Posted By: KraZ440
Hi all. I've recently installed an oil filter sandwich adapter on my 2000 Saab 9-5 2.3t to allow me to easily install an oil pressure gauge. Installation when well. No leaks were apparent....
Hi, Good to hear this - sorry if I'm off-topic, but should be great to know where did you buy it, what oil do you use (M10W40) and what are the typical values (idle, 2000, 3000 rpm).
 

KraZ440

Thread starter
Messages
10
Location
Seattle, WA
Originally Posted By: wings&wheels
Nice car, always a fan of the 9-5 (and 9000) series. I would not use a simple pipe adapter or 'T' fitting at the end of an adapter. Having a typical oil pressure sensor or worse, 2 sensors (gauge and light) cantilevered at the end of a pipe fitting is asking for trouble. I've seen a few failures where the simple adapter pipes fail. I've added pressure gauges using aircraft practice (at least the GA stuff I deal with) which is to run a fitting and quality hose (think Aeroquip or equivalent & long enough to absorb flex) from the port to the sender(s) mounted on the firewall or, if you can, a bracket on the engine. Obviously, watch for heat & anything that could abrade the hose. Also, I'd keep the 'idiot' light, much better at getting your attention. VDO (and others I'm sure) make pressure senders that also have a warning circuit that closes at a specified pressure. Depending on how your SAAB is wired, you could use this to feed the existing idiot light or wire another one, buzzer, etc. I like buzzers...the louder and more irritating the better. Good luck. w
Thanks. My wife and I have fallen in love with it. My big concern currently, is to make sure the engine doesn't blow up on me. It was pretty badly sludged up when I got it and I'm in in the middle of its rehabilitation project. Since I'm using a sandwich adapter, I don't need any T fittings (it would be difficult to use a T fitting anyway, since there is extremely little space where the idiot light sensor is). The idiot light is still where it always has been and the sensor for the new gauge is screwed directly into sandwich adapter. Not the ideal solution, but a good compromise.
 

KraZ440

Thread starter
Messages
10
Location
Seattle, WA
Originally Posted By: zoli
Good to hear this - sorry if I'm off-topic, but should be great to know where did you buy it, what oil do you use (M10W40) and what are the typical values (idle, 2000, 3000 rpm).
Off-topic is what this board lives for. smile I bought the gauge and adapter from Glowshift. They are not the best quality parts, but they are a good price. I'm currently running Mobil-1 0W40. Due to the oil pressure issues I'm having, I'm wanting higher a viscosity at operating temperature. Also, due to the sludge buildup, I'm wanting oil with good cleaning properties. From what I've read, Mobil-1 0W40 is good in both these areas. Currently, when the engine has warmed up to normal operating temperature, I see about 15 psi at idle, 20-25 psi at 1000 rpm, and 40-50 psi at 2000 rpm. Occasionally, if I try really hard, it'll drop down to 10 psi at idle, but it doesn't stay there long (as soon as I start moving again, it goes back up to 15 psi). From what I've read, these pressures are good enough, but I'll want to keep an eye on them next summer.
 
Messages
311
Location
Hungary
Installed oil pressure sensor into an oil gallery at top of the engine, driver's side. Some measured facts: Cold start: more than 100 psi Warm engine, approx. 60 MPH (2200 rev, no traffic jam): 30-40 psi Warm engine, approx. 35 MPH (1800 rev, no traffic jam): 25-30 psi Warm engine, idling: 15-20 psi In case of high traffic: 60 MPH: 20-25 psi 35 MPH: 15-20 psi idling:10 psi Oil: 5W40 Shell Helix Ultra Oil filter: OEM MANN W712/80 Any comment is appreciated!
 
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Messages
3,681
Location
ks, wichita
when i started driving ,1965, a lot talk went into how good is your oil pressure. my dad told my that if the oil pressure goes up from idle with the rpm its fine.
 
Messages
8,598
Location
Florida
Originally Posted By: morris
when i started driving ,1965, a lot talk went into how good is your oil pressure. my dad told my that if the oil pressure goes up from idle with the rpm its fine.
This makes me think of something I was told: Oil pressure should be 10 PSI at idle plus another 10 PSI per 1000 RPM increase. However, I prefer being able to look in a service manual and read what the manufacturer really expects oil pressure to be. I can understand why people focused on oil pressure back then. Worn bearings created low oil pressure, and car engines usually didn't last as long back then.
 
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