Linglong Crosstour

Messages
996
Location
Colorado
Needing an inexpensive set of replacement tires for my little 22' camper, I succumbed to the vast amount of positive reviews on WalMart.com and purchased two Crosstour tires. Yeah, this is a little single axle trailer, where I upgraded the rims to 16" and I run 235/85-16, 10 ply tires..... cause I tow the little guy way off the grid, into the back-country and I want toughness and never a flat. When I checked-out with the shop manager, I asked him if he had any opinion on the tires. He just said they have only been selling them for a few months, but that they were installing tons of them that are being purchased on Walmart.com. He said they seem good, balance fine and so far.... haven't had a single failure come back in. Technically, they are delivered from Simple Tire. While I was shopping online, I found Crosstours in a 255/55-19 for $80 a piece. Locally, I couldn't find summer tires for the wife's Benz for less than $150 and the stock tires priced out at $240 a tire. I may regret it, but I dropped the $320 for four new Crosstours for our ML250. The tires arrived yesterday and they look great. Tread is thick and they look well-made. Note, we have two sets of rims and run winter and summer tires on that car, so the summer tires only get about 10k miles a year. Anyway, I will report on how these tires perform over time, but wonder if anyone else has given these a try? I'm not expecting miraculous results, but if they will last three years and 30k miles, I will be pleased for the price. (Our turbo diesels tend to go through tires more quickly than any gas auto's I have had in my life.) I am sooo soooo temped to purchase a set of Crosstour 305/70-17's for my Ram EcoDiesel at $130 a tire. ============================= PROFILE Linglong Americas, Inc. is a subsidiary of Shandong Linglong Tire Co., Ltd., a Top 20 global tire manufacturer with headquarters in Zhaoyuan City in the Shandong Province of China. In addition, the company is among the Top 3 tire manufacturers based in China with global sales of over $1.5 billion in 2016. Linglong employs over 12,000 people worldwide. The company's "3 + 3" manufacturing strategy includes three production facilities in China and plans for three more plants in other countries. Linglong currently has production facilities in Zhaoyuan City, Dezhou and Liuzhou, China. In 2013, Linglong opened its first international tire production facility in Thailand for high performance radial passenger, light truck and truck-bus tire production. This gave the company annual production capacity of 51 million units. There are plans for future tire production facilities in Europe and the Americas. Linglong is striving to become a Top 10 global tire manufacturer in sales and achieve an annual capacity of 90 million units by 2020. Linglong introduced the first indoor noise and rolling resistance laboratories in China for tire testing. The company has achieved more than 60 national standards in China and obtained over 300 domestic and international patents. Linglong has twice been awarded the "National Prize for Progress in Science and Technology" in China for innovative tire designs. The company has acquired multiple domestic and international certificates including China 3C, European ECE, Arab States GCC, Brazilian INMETRO, and American DOT and SmartWay certification. Linglong is also an OE (Original Equipment) supplier for GM, Ford, Volkswagen,Tata, Tenant-Nissan, Fiat, Hyundai, and more. Linglong Americas was established in the U.S. near Akron, Ohio in 2009 as the company's first international design and technical center. In 2014, in conjunction with IDIADA Automotive Technology S.A. of Spain, the company broke ground on a 365 acre tire proving grounds near the headquarters in Zhaoyuan City. This will be one of the first and most complete tire proving grounds established in China. The facility became operational near the end of 2016. For American market tires, Linglong Americas conducts performance testing of products at proving grounds in the U.S. on a contract basis. In 2015, Linglong celebrated its 40th anniversary as a company. The name Linglong means "exquisite" in Chinese and the company's goal is for that to describe its products. To reach that mark, the company is focused on developing a top-tier enterprise utilizing state-of-the-art facilities, quality products, and a well-established management team.
 
Messages
369
Location
New Jersey
玲珑 Trad. 玲瓏 líng lóng (onom.) clink of jewels exquisite detailed and fine clever nimble How bad can they be with a name like that? My first thought was "Panda", I was pleasantly surprised. Drill down to the Urban Dictionary and it is not a nice moniker.
 
Messages
4,177
Location
Texas
Our 2015Chevy Sonic came with Hankook tires . Ended up buying 4 from Walmart . So far , they are doing OK . Fingers crossed . Might give them a look ? Think I ordered them online for delivery to the local Walmart Store . Where I had them mounted / installed .
 
Messages
10,001
Location
Waco, TX
Korean tires (Hankook, Kenda, Kumho, etc.) have generally always treated me well. Chinese tires are very "hit and miss". Some last a long time and perform well, others are a lawsuit waiting to happen.
 
Messages
572
Location
Ohio
Authorities Seize Shandong Linglong Tire Booth at SEMA 31 October 2012 United States: Federal marshals seized the display booth of Chinese tire maker Shandong Linglong Tire Co. at the SEMA Show, claiming its contents as partial repayment of a $26 million court judgment against the company. Jordan Fishman, CEO of Florida-based Tire Engineering and Distribution L.L.C., contacted the federal government and requested the Oct. 29 seizure. This was Fishman's first attempt to collect on the judgment against Shandong Linglong and Dubai-based tire distributor Al- Dobowi Tires Co. L.L.C. In a suit filed in October 2009 before the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Alexandria, Va., Fishman accused Shandong Linglong and Al-Dobowi of conspiring with a former associate of Fishman's to steal Fishman's proprietary designs for underground mining tires. The jury in the Alexandria court ruled in Fishman's favor on all counts in July 2010 and levied the $26 million in damages. Shandong Linglong appealed, but a federal appeals court affirmed the lower court decision in June 2012. Before the raid, Shandong Linglong had not paid Fishman a penny of the judgment, according to August J. Matteis, Fishman's attorney and a partner in the Washington law firm of Weisbrod Matteis & Copley P.L.L.C. "They're taking the position that if we want the money, we have to come get it," Matteis said. The value of the booth and its contents-including tires, a computer and the booth itself-is not significant, Fishman said. But the raid was important is making a point, he said. "This is my way of telling them, ‘You don't understand that you're not going to get away with this,'" Fishman said. "'This is the U.S., not China.'" When Fishman confronted Shandong Linglong executives in 2005 about the theft of his designs, they laughed in his face, he claims. "They told me seven years ago that I was too old and not rich enough to beat them-that I would die before seeing a penny," according to Fishma. "Well, I'm still here, and I'm about to see my first penny from them. But I won't stop until I get every penny from these thieves." The contents of the booth will be sold at a sheriffs' auction, Matteis said. Source: Executive News - Weekly Summary, October 30 - November 5, 2012; IHS Automotive/Rubber News Chinese Company to Cooperate in ITC Patent Investigation 18 September 2013 United States: A Chinese tire company, Shandong Linglong Tire Co., said it will actively cooperate with the U.S. International Trade Commission's investigation of patent infringement, according to the Global Times. ITC recently announced it would investigate 22 tiremakers and tire importers following a patent infringement claim filed by Toyo Tire Holdings of America. Shandong Linglong Tire is one of seven Chinese tire companies named in the claim. A spokesman for the company said the incident might have been caused by its OEM business, and it has since suspended that business since Toyo filed the complaint. The spokesman told the Global Times that its OEM business involves clients providing blueprints and mold for the company from which the tiremaker produces tires. It is possible those blueprints and molds could have infringed upon Toyo's design patents, the spokesman said. If a patent violation has been found, the ITC will issue a ban on imports of the products involved. Source: Executive News Summary - Weekly Summary, September 17-23, 2013; IHS Automotive/Tire Review
 
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CKN

Messages
5,915
Location
Utah
Originally Posted by jjjxlr8
Authorities Seize Shandong Linglong Tire Booth at SEMA 31 October 2012 United States: Federal marshals seized the display booth of Chinese tire maker Shandong Linglong Tire Co. at the SEMA Show, claiming its contents as partial repayment of a $26 million court judgment against the company. Jordan Fishman, CEO of Florida-based Tire Engineering and Distribution L.L.C., contacted the federal government and requested the Oct. 29 seizure. This was Fishman's first attempt to collect on the judgment against Shandong Linglong and Dubai-based tire distributor Al- Dobowi Tires Co. L.L.C. In a suit filed in October 2009 before the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Alexandria, Va., Fishman accused Shandong Linglong and Al-Dobowi of conspiring with a former associate of Fishman's to steal Fishman's proprietary designs for underground mining tires. The jury in the Alexandria court ruled in Fishman's favor on all counts in July 2010 and levied the $26 million in damages. Shandong Linglong appealed, but a federal appeals court affirmed the lower court decision in June 2012. Before the raid, Shandong Linglong had not paid Fishman a penny of the judgment, according to August J. Matteis, Fishman's attorney and a partner in the Washington law firm of Weisbrod Matteis & Copley P.L.L.C. "They're taking the position that if we want the money, we have to come get it," Matteis said. The value of the booth and its contents-including tires, a computer and the booth itself-is not significant, Fishman said. But the raid was important is making a point, he said. "This is my way of telling them, ‘You don't understand that you're not going to get away with this,'" Fishman said. "'This is the U.S., not China.'" When Fishman confronted Shandong Linglong executives in 2005 about the theft of his designs, they laughed in his face, he claims. "They told me seven years ago that I was too old and not rich enough to beat them-that I would die before seeing a penny," according to Fishma. "Well, I'm still here, and I'm about to see my first penny from them. But I won't stop until I get every penny from these thieves." The contents of the booth will be sold at a sheriffs' auction, Matteis said. Source: Executive News - Weekly Summary, October 30 - November 5, 2012; IHS Automotive/Rubber News Chinese Company to Cooperate in ITC Patent Investigation 18 September 2013 United States: A Chinese tire company, Shandong Linglong Tire Co., said it will actively cooperate with the U.S. International Trade Commission's investigation of patent infringement, according to the Global Times. ITC recently announced it would investigate 22 tiremakers and tire importers following a patent infringement claim filed by Toyo Tire Holdings of America. Shandong Linglong Tire is one of seven Chinese tire companies named in the claim. A spokesman for the company said the incident might have been caused by its OEM business, and it has since suspended that business since Toyo filed the complaint. The spokesman told the Global Times that its OEM business involves clients providing blueprints and mold for the company from which the tiremaker produces tires. It is possible those blueprints and molds could have infringed upon Toyo's design patents, the spokesman said. If a patent violation has been found, the ITC will issue a ban on imports of the products involved. Source: Executive News Summary - Weekly Summary, September 17-23, 2013; IHS Automotive/Tire Review
Both news items several years old................REALLY???
 
Messages
11,187
Location
Colorado Springs
American reality: I need car with all safety tech inside and preferably SUV to keep my family safe, as nothing comes before family! Next day: Where can I find cheapest tires available?
 
Messages
4,271
Location
Central Arkansastan
I've seen many cases of what good-looking Chinese tires will do to the wheel wells of travel trailers. I will never put a set on a car. There are simply way too many better options for that.
 
Messages
6,433
Location
New England
IF they are just summer tires why not. I am actually pretty curious as I have a 190k 07 Acura MDX and want to spend as little as possible on the car.
 
Messages
612
Location
Joplin
Below is a portion from a past Car and Driver article: Tire Test: The Quick and the Tread We test 11 of the big names in street tires. ...Consistently finishing last in all of the performance categories, the Ling Longs' dry autocross performance was so far behind the other tires' that we had to round its score up to zero to keep it from being negative. Things got worse in the wet, where slip-and-slide behavior required a conservative effort to stay between the cones. But even though they cost half the price of many competing tires, they scored less than half the points of even the eighth-place tire. To us, that doesn't qualify as a value, ...
 
Messages
7,190
Location
California
Originally Posted by Fawteen
So you have a Mercedes Benz, and yet scrimp and put the cheapest set of Chinese tires on it?
Some of those Chinese tires aren't bad - the local Lexus dealer has Milestar for the "cheapskates" that come in. But still. Unless I drive for Uber/Lyft/Amazon or the car is being offloaded or the final stop is a junkyard, I'm leery about most Chinese tires. Milestar, Sailun and one more are exceptions to the rule.
 

CKN

Messages
5,915
Location
Utah
Originally Posted by Propflux01
I've seen many cases of what good-looking Chinese tires will do to the wheel wells of travel trailers. I will never put a set on a car. There are simply way too many better options for that.
Yep-I have too. But usually those trailers are blasting by me at 70plus (mph) most ST tires are rated for 65mph. I also seen these same tires underinflated and used for "curb-hopping". Let's paint the entire picture....shall we? I have run three sets of ST trailer Chinese tires. Not one had a blow out-NOT ONE. One set (of 4) was run from Salt Lake City to the East Coast. BUT I never exceed 65mph, ALWAYS check my inflation, don't curb hop, and they are replaced at the first signs of dry rot.
 
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Messages
4,226
Location
Central Maryland
What a slimy company. I suspect a settlement with non-disclosure was reached after the 2013 trade show incident, because there's absolutely nothing in the news after that, and I suspect Fishman was not going to just give up.
 
Messages
1,315
Location
Elizabeth. Colorado
I guess I'm going to be the one who isn't screaming with my hands in the air.... Buy Linglong with confidence. I sell USA goods in China, I'm there a lot. You see Linglongs on everything, especially heavy trucks and busses (DoubleCoin too). There aren't fiery wrecks on the side of the road, no more alligators on the highway than here, and they are sold by the major tire stores out there. I know I know, Chinese tire it has to be junk just because it's Chineeeeeeesssseeeee. They said that about Made in Japan goods once too.
 

BigJohn

Thread starter
Messages
996
Location
Colorado
715 miles today from Colorado to Montana. The Crosstourers are performing outstanding!!! No heat build-up and they are rolling quiet and smooth. Near zero wear noticed. And this was all interstate highway, running 70-75mph. This is for the 235/85r16 trailer tires. The previous tires, Federal MT's..... Had shown noticeable wear at 1,000 miles. This is a single axle camper with 2,200-2,400lbs on each tire.
 

BigJohn

Thread starter
Messages
996
Location
Colorado
Originally Posted by Fawteen
So you have a Mercedes Benz, and yet scrimp and put the cheapest set of Chinese tires on it?
I'm not a Brand Snot..... I could care less what the marketing says. Sure, Third-world tires are a risk, but for 50% the cost of anyone else with a full warrantee, I will give them a go. I was also the guy buying Motoz motorcycle tires years ago when they first hit the market and were $80-$100 a tire, brand new on the market and most turned their nose up at me.... cause they weren't Michelin's. Now everyone loves them at $200 a rear tire. I drive a Benz diesel, not because it is a status symbol.... but because I plan to eclipse 300k miles with it.
 
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