Cost to Repair a Honda V6 Engine that Jumps Time

The Critic

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Originally Posted by benjamming
Did the oil leak issue get identified and fixed?
The original oil leak was the oil pump gasket. The second oil leak was from a crank seal that was slightly nicked during install (from the keyway on the crankshaft).
Originally Posted by Dave Sherman
I'll gladly take the timing belt on my Pilot over the troublesome timing chains I had on my Traverse. At least the belt is designed to be replaced without pulling the engine first. The cost of replacing the chains on the Traverse is typically around $3000.
The market price for a timing belt service, spark plugs and valve adjust on a Honda J-series V6 is about $2500 in this area.
Originally Posted by krismoriah72
IMHO not worth it. One of my family members had same year accord. Had a few issues with A/C pumps, then trans started slipping despite frequent fluid changes. K24 cars were ok..
This one is p/s pump #3 (the last two were Cardone, go figure). The trans is still okay but does display some signs of delayed engagement.
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr
Do you ever have problems with oil burning after removing the heads. I have not had to do this sort of repair in over 40 years, it was a problem then. It happens when the friction lock between the head and block gets broken and due to core shifts the bore is no longer round. With seated rings and crosshatch, the engine can not reseal. Rod
I have not had this issue, but I only recently began doing major repairs. This car was completed about a week ago. The last head job I did has 4k miles on it without any issues.
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr
The used engine would have still needed a new belt, hoses, mounts, etc so it would have cost more
The ~$550 number for parts on the used engine included hoses and a t-belt kit. The mounts are fairly new (and OE) on this car.
Originally Posted by jeepman3071
duh
Indeed.
Originally Posted by CT8
What is a 2006 Honda Accord worth?
$4-$6K.
 
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Originally Posted by CT8
What is a 2006 Honda Accord worth?
Repairing the existing car is way cheaper than buying a new car. If the car is liked, does what the owner requires of it and isn't rusted to death, why not fix it? Who cares what it's "worth"? It's value really only comes into play when you're looking at selling it or dealing with insurance claims. Naturally every auto comes to a point where it's not feasible to repair it and there is greater value in replacing it, but for a Cali car with not a huge amount of miles on it, more than likely it still has lots of serviceable life.
 

The Critic

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On an semi-related note, Honda needs to sell a "valve-grind" gasket kit like Toyota does. Or even a complete Engine Overhaul Gasket Kit. It would have made the parts ordering process A LOT easier (and probably cheaper).
 
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Originally Posted by brages
What does "stretch" mean?
It means "to make longer". cool No, that is what happens. If you were to chop a link on a new chain and measure it, and compare that length against a "stretched" chain, you'd find the stretched chain measures longer. The term though is a misnomer. Nothing in the chain actually got longer. But if you look at the chain, it is essentially a bunch of pins and plates. Some plates are press fit to the pins, some plates are loose fit. Over time, those loose fit holes become larger. Or the pins themselves have a groove worn into them. Either way, the chain gets more sloppy, and longer. Eventually the tensioner can't keep up. Now this issue is rampant on bicycles, as the chain is exposed to the elements and wears out rather fast (especially if not maintained). But when they wear, they typically damage cassettes and chain rings. For some reason I've yet to hear of this problem on engines--but I'm no mechanic and have not replaced a chain just yet. But when a chain stretches it likely (always?) damages the sprockets that it uses.
 
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Originally Posted by The Critic
On an semi-related note, Honda needs to sell a "valve-grind" gasket kit like Toyota does. Or even a complete Engine Overhaul Gasket Kit. It would have made the parts ordering process A LOT easier (and probably cheaper).
Ford has them and it is nice. What isn't nice is when they update different parts in the kit to not include head bolts and forget to list it.
 
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Originally Posted by supton
Originally Posted by brages
What does "stretch" mean?
It means "to make longer". cool No, that is what happens. If you were to chop a link on a new chain and measure it, and compare that length against a "stretched" chain, you'd find the stretched chain measures longer. The term though is a misnomer. Nothing in the chain actually got longer. But if you look at the chain, it is essentially a bunch of pins and plates. Some plates are press fit to the pins, some plates are loose fit. Over time, those loose fit holes become larger. Or the pins themselves have a groove worn into them. Either way, the chain gets more sloppy, and longer. Eventually the tensioner can't keep up. Now this issue is rampant on bicycles, as the chain is exposed to the elements and wears out rather fast (especially if not maintained). But when they wear, they typically damage cassettes and chain rings. For some reason I've yet to hear of this problem on engines--but I'm no mechanic and have not replaced a chain just yet. But when a chain stretches it likely (always?) damages the sprockets that it uses.
GM 3.6 is just one example, there are others, part of the fix was a shorter OCI.
 
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Originally Posted by The Critic
Originally Posted by ctechbob
Any idea on the cause? Broken belt or deferred maintenance?
It was user error. grin During an oil leak diagnosis, the engine was accidentally allowed to run without the crank pulley being installed. Clearly this was a terrible idea since the crank sprocket is keyed to the crankshaft.
Ouch - that was a painful mistake.
 
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Originally Posted by Trav
Originally Posted by supton
Originally Posted by brages
What does "stretch" mean?
It means "to make longer". cool No, that is what happens. If you were to chop a link on a new chain and measure it, and compare that length against a "stretched" chain, you'd find the stretched chain measures longer. The term though is a misnomer. Nothing in the chain actually got longer. But if you look at the chain, it is essentially a bunch of pins and plates. Some plates are press fit to the pins, some plates are loose fit. Over time, those loose fit holes become larger. Or the pins themselves have a groove worn into them. Either way, the chain gets more sloppy, and longer. Eventually the tensioner can't keep up. Now this issue is rampant on bicycles, as the chain is exposed to the elements and wears out rather fast (especially if not maintained). But when they wear, they typically damage cassettes and chain rings. For some reason I've yet to hear of this problem on engines--but I'm no mechanic and have not replaced a chain just yet. But when a chain stretches it likely (always?) damages the sprockets that it uses.
GM 3.6 is just one example, there are others, part of the fix was a shorter OCI.
Yet the idiots at GM dropped the indestructible 3.8 in favirtually of the cam chain eating 3.6 and the awful 3.9. Rod.
 
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The problem with the 3800 was its physical size, it was a big, heavy and wide engine for its displacement and wouldn't work well in the later body styles which demand weight savings, great engine though.
 
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