2021 Ford Explorer XLT 2.3L Ecoboost

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There is no factory separator on the Explorer, which is unfortunate as you can see. All those 2.3L Ecoboosts sucking oil into the intake and ending up on the valve's!

This is installed on the PVC, so "dirty side".

Every Ecoboost has some form of oil separator, including the Explorer. The design has changed over the years, but they are still there. The Mustang even has an upgraded 'track only' part.

 

blackstallion

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Every Ecoboost has some form of oil separator, including the Explorer. The design has changed over the years, but they are still there. The Mustang even has an upgraded 'track only' part.

Hum, thank you for pointing that out. I was mixing up my terms, since it seems an OEM oil separator performs the PCV function and does not catch and contain any oil, whereas the aftermarket oil separator I installed takes it one step further and catches/condenses the mixture.

So to answer your original question, the catch can I installed plumbs in between the OEM oil separator and PCV hose and stops all that oil/gas vapor from making it's way into the intake and valves, and rather condenses in the catch can.

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Question is, what is this (6758)?

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Joined
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Hum, thank you for pointing that out. I was mixing up my terms, since it seems an OEM oil separator performs the PCV function and does not catch and contain any oil, whereas the aftermarket oil separator I installed takes it one step further and catches/condenses the mixture.

So to answer your original question, the catch can I installed plumbs in between the OEM oil separator and PCV hose and stops all that oil/gas vapor from making it's way into the intake and valves, and rather condenses in the catch can.

It separates the oil and returns it to the pan. It doesn't contain it, true, but it is supposed to not let any/much through.

The theory behind the catch can is sound, but the debate on the actual usefullness of them with the new designed separators goes on. No one is quite sure whether you actually need one or not. I'm erring on the side at the moment of not, but then again I'm doing other things like more frequent oil changes and a half can of CRC intake valve cleaner before every oil chage. Sooooo, who knows.
 

blackstallion

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It separates the oil and returns it to the pan. It doesn't contain it, true, but it is supposed to not let any/much through.

The theory behind the catch can is sound, but the debate on the actual usefullness of them with the new designed separators goes on. No one is quite sure whether you actually need one or not. I'm erring on the side at the moment of not, but then again I'm doing other things like more frequent oil changes and a half can of CRC intake valve cleaner before every oil chage. Sooooo, who knows.
Well, if the stock separators job is to send those vapor's back into the crankcase, it's definitely missing some otherwise the catch can I installed would not be collecting so much.

And regarding the CRC intake valve cleaner, is this connected through the vacuum system? If so, what have you found to be the most appropriate method for accomplishing this on the Explorer?
 
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Well, if the stock separators job is to send those vapor's back into the crankcase, it's definitely missing some otherwise the catch can I installed would not be collecting so much.

And regarding the CRC intake valve cleaner, is this connected through the vacuum system? If so, what have you found to be the most appropriate method for accomplishing this on the Explorer?
Not if you plumbed it in before the factory one, which I think most all of them do.

Yes, you pipe it in before the throttle body. One must be careful though to keep revs up to keep it from pooling in the intake. I've used both the CRC and the BG so far. The BG comes as a kit with some hoses and connectors that make it an easier job and would let you use the cheaper can of CRC the next time.
 

blackstallion

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Not if you plumbed it in before the factory one, which I think most all of them do.

Yes, you pipe it in before the throttle body. One must be careful though to keep revs up to keep it from pooling in the intake. I've used both the CRC and the BG so far. The BG comes as a kit with some hoses and connectors that make it an easier job and would let you use the cheaper can of CRC the next time.
I purchased the JLT catch can and plumbed it in per their direction.


 

blackstallion

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After 5k miles with the catch can attached, about 2oz (2/3 of the 3oz can). Should I be concerned about the sludge?

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Just purchased new. Manual states 1k mile break in period, but nothing about first recommended oil change. It has right over 1k miles now, and I do about 400 miles a week.

Being a GDI turbo engine, what is the best practice for when to perform first oil change on this engine?

And I plan on an extended life oil filter ie. Fram Ultra or M1 with full synthetic oil. Is 10k miles safe with this engine?
I changed the factory fill at 3800 in my 2.3 Ranger. Heavy fuel smell. Second change at 8800(M1 extended 5-30), zero fuel smell. Engine runs great and is a beast! Third oil change this weekend at 11,800(I go off road a lot, this will be my dec-jan-feb fill. Oh, and you can get Motorcraft 910s filters at Walmart for less than $4.00.
 
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