134A Refrigerant Source

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Dec 31, 2017
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Our Walmart seems to have Frosty Cool 134 refrigerant on their website. Is anyone familiar with this. I’m looking for refrigerant for my 2008 GM truck after I take care of some leaks.

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Pittsburgh,PA U.S.A.
If it is propane, it would probably be free of any moisture. I do not know fore sure but suspest common propaine may contain too much moisture to allow it to work as a refrigerant gas.
 
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I thought you couldnt get r134a in canada. Might have to cross to the usa to get some.
 
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Looks the same as this stuff I've used in the past...


Worked okay!
R1234YF is the new stuff. Comes standard in many cars now, unless they've since moved on to something else. I don't know anything about cross compatibility.

Huh? The majority of the cars on the road use it. Find that hard to believe.

Some countries aren't as caring in respect to that. Don't know about Canada specifically, but the EU tends to say XYZ is going to change on this date, no ifs, ands or buts, have at it.
 
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It’s true, R134a is illegal to sell to regular customers, you need a license to buy it. I used to buy it in states and bring it over. But if that is not feasible, the propane version works quite well apparently, but I never got a chance to use it.
How can putting a highly flammable gas into your a/c system be legal either? Get into a front end crash where the condenser is damaged and a small spark can set it off.
 
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Propane is many times as flammable as "petrol". You've been watching too many 70's TV shows where a car blows up in a crash. All staged. Many youtube videos to prove how hard it is get gas to explode.

And where did you got your propane exploding from?

In Europe, propane gas conversions are quite popular as LPG is about half the price of gasoline. These cars do not explode. They may catch on fire, just like gas would, but not explode, because the gas is in liquid state, hence the name LPG, L stands for liquid.
 
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Propane gas conversions use components specifically made for that application with thick walled tanks and heavy duty hoses. A condenser as well as most of the A/C lines are soft thin aluminum.
 
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Propane gas conversions use components specifically made for that application with thick walled tanks and heavy duty hoses. A condenser as well as most of the A/C lines are soft thin aluminum.

Components are selected based on pressures the system will run at, not the type of gas that is in them, try again. In fact, propane runs at lower pressures than R134a.

The only difference would be material compatibility, as some gasses, or gas mixes may attack the components and cause issues, but I’m not aware of any special requirements for LPG.
 
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Ah yes, where all else fails let’s wheel out a government agency and their take on the matter 😒


Straight from their website you linked. They are fine with approving flammable refrigerants where there is a big lobby behind it. What safety features they speak of though, I do not know and I’m pretty sure you don’t know either.

That’s the same EPA that pumped raw diesel exhaust gases into lungs of homeless and children all to prove how bad diesel is. They are sure here to save us from ourselves🤣

All flammable refrigerants, except two non-HC refrigerants: R-152a (also known as HFC-152a) and R-1234yf (HFO-1234yf), are unacceptable for use in new and retrofit MVACs. Importantly, R-152a and R-1234yf are acceptable for new MVACs only, where there are built-in safety features.
 
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No legitimate shop would risk using propane in an A/C system and it's certainly not EPA approved.

EPA does not regulate the use of HC refrigerants because they are not ozone depleting, with one exception: They are not allowed to be used as a substitute for R12.

There is no such restriction for using them to replace R134a.
 
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