Top Tier Regular Octane Additives vs. High Octane Additives ?

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I use only Top Tier regular 87 octane gasoline (typically Shell , Chevron , 76) ... What may I find with respect Top Tier additives vs. their premium high-octane gasolines ? *The Top Tier high octane gasolines have fancy marketing terms (Shell V- Power Nitrogen+ , etc. ) while the regular and mid-grade Top Tier gasolines are just sort of there alongside the high octane versions with little fanfare .
 
Since the Top Tier standard must be met by all grades of fuel sold through that pump, I would say that, additive wise, buying premium just gives you extra foam on the head of your beer.
 
You do realize that the best power & efficiency is normally achieved using the lowest octane that does not ping/detonate in your engine?
If your engine doesn't require it, then you don't need it and it provides no benefit.
 
I use only Top Tier regular 87 octane gasoline (typically Shell , Chevron , 76) ... What may I find with respect Top Tier additives vs. their premium high-octane gasolines ? *The Top Tier high octane gasolines have fancy marketing terms (Shell V- Power Nitrogen+ , etc. ) while the regular and mid-grade Top Tier gasolines are just sort of there alongside the high octane versions with little fanfare .
no idea. what the difference is. the marking department had a field day though adding pluses and alphabet to establish dominance of how amazing their product is.
 
Almost certainly, name brand premium fuel has more/different additives than regular fuel, over and above what the top tier minimum is.

With that said, just use whatever octane is specified.
 
You do realize that the best power & efficiency is normally achieved using the lowest octane that does not ping/detonate in your engine?
If your engine doesn't require it, then you don't need it and it provides no benefit.
Is that accurate on computer-controlled systems today ? I've had/seen multiple car's owners manuals that say 87 octane is the minimum required and higher octane fuel "may provide add'l performance" and/or fuel economy.
 
Is that accurate on computer-controlled systems today ? I've had/seen multiple car's owners manuals that say 87 octane is the minimum required and higher octane fuel "may provide add'l performance" and/or fuel economy.
Some vehicles, like Mazda, do have a power difference betwixt 87 and 93 octane, for example.

DOES MAZDA CX-5 REQUIRE PREMIUM GAS?​

No, the Mazda CX-5 does not require premium gasoline and can be operated with 87 octane gasoline no matter your engine choice. The available SKYACTIV®-G 2.5 Turbo four-cylinder engine will reach new heights when you use 93 octane premium gasoline. Specifically, it’ll make 227 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque when using 87 octane gasoline and 256 horsepower and 320 pound-feet of torque when using 93 octane gasoline.
 
I use only Top Tier regular 87 octane gasoline (typically Shell , Chevron , 76) ... What may I find with respect Top Tier additives vs. their premium high-octane gasolines ? *The Top Tier high octane gasolines have fancy marketing terms (Shell V- Power Nitrogen+ , etc. ) while the regular and mid-grade Top Tier gasolines are just sort of there alongside the high octane versions with little fanfare .
Premium offerings receive a slightly higher dose. There's a long thread around here by a N. Georgia tanker driver and in the past a dosing chart had been uploaded.
 
Is that accurate on computer-controlled systems today ? I've had/seen multiple car's owners manuals that say 87 octane is the minimum required and higher octane fuel "may provide add'l performance" and/or fuel economy.

This is more commonplace with modern turbocharged engines
 
I use only Top Tier regular 87 octane gasoline (typically Shell , Chevron , 76) ... What may I find with respect Top Tier additives vs. their premium high-octane gasolines ? *The Top Tier high octane gasolines have fancy marketing terms (Shell V- Power Nitrogen+ , etc. ) while the regular and mid-grade Top Tier gasolines are just sort of there alongside the high octane versions with little fanfare .
They all meet top tier requirement as others have said which is more than sufficient. IE: I would not purchase 93 octane if not required for your vehicle.
After that you'll have to refer to individual marketing statements.

SHELL says 5 Times the detergents / additives over it's regular.
I don't think they explicitly say this anymore. I think that at one point they did put that in writing.
 
Really depends. Some companies admit to a higher additive concentration for premium. Someone posted a chart of a hand-poured additive for Chevron, and at the minimum level was maybe 1 bottle for every 400 gallons of "Supreme" but 500 galls for regular.

I've seen marketing materials claiming that a particular additive could be used for everything from minimum EPA requirements to Top Tier certified. I suppose they could go higher if they really wanted.
 
This is more commonplace with modern turbocharged engines
So, pretty much all modern passenger models out there 😉

[QUOTE="I Some vehicles, like Mazda, do have a power difference betwixt 87 and 93 octane, for example.
[/QUOTE]
12% increase in horsepower ! That's a lot more than I would have anticipated. I'd have figured single-digit % increase at best.
 
like vitamin D-3 mainstream considers 30 adequate BUT savy nutritional coaches like 60-70!! turbo'd engines can easily produce more power IF-IF theres proper tuning along with higher octane to prevent knock, today most everything is Direct Injected that cools the fuel allowing MORE cylinder pressure without knock on reg + depending on your ECU programming can increase power substantially!!! look at the #'s on GoAPR a vw audi tuner to SEE the big power with premium high octane fuels + their tunes, they even have tunes for RACE gas!! on the nutritional note i NEVER get a cold or similar taking higher levels of nutrients!!
 
Is that accurate on computer-controlled systems today ? I've had/seen multiple car's owners manuals that say 87 octane is the minimum required and higher octane fuel "may provide add'l performance" and/or fuel economy.
Yep, there are engines that can take advantage of the higher octane to make more power. And you can sometimes add a custom tune to do that, if the rest of the engine design supports it. The Mazda skyactiv engines are one example, since they have high compression ratios but are de-tuned for 87 octane gas.

My point is that if your engine doesn't do that, then running higher octane gas than you need has no benefit and may actually be detrimental.

For example, most octane boosters (like ethanol) have less energy per unit volume than gasoline. The more you blend in to increase the octane, the less energy per unit volume the gasoline has. Engines that can take advantage of the higher octane may produce enough extra power to compensate for that. But for engines that don't, power or fuel economy will drop correspondingly.
 
There are various additive packages that they can use. Blending more detergent into premium vs regular is at the discretion of the buyer, including whether they tell and market that fact to the end customers. It is definitely not a guarantee that they are distinguishingly additive boosting their higher octane blends.
 
Premium offerings receive a slightly higher dose. There's a long thread around here by a N. Georgia tanker driver and in the past a dosing chart had been uploaded.
That has been my experience as a fuel terminal manager. Additive levels were increased for the higher octane fuels.
In other words, premium fuel meant premium.
 
So, pretty much all modern passenger models out there 😉


12% increase in horsepower ! That's a lot more than I would have anticipated. I'd have figured single-digit % increase at best.
Correkt
 
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