Thoughts of a good well rounded grease

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So I came to find this website, due to a search for a good marine grease. For my trailer wheel bearings, and other service areas on my boat and Jet Ski, i.e. pivot points, steering linkage, drive shaft splines for my jet pump and gimbal bearing on lower unit. After spending hours of research on the net and reading post after post on this forum. I am still as lost as I was when I started… From people saying grease with a lithium complex base isn’t good for being waterproof, but Bel-Rays extreme waterproof grease is a lithium base with water washout @ 4.2. Among other high water resistant greases that were lithium based. Aluminum complex greases were the best at being ‘waterproof”, to reading that calcium sulfonate was ranked the best for water washout!! So what am I trying to get at… Well what is the best “marine grade grease” and if it is that great at protecting marine components, can I use it on my truck and car as well. For example, wheel bearings, u-joints and suspicion components. Take for granted that I do all of my maintenance on my vehicles and I might have a tube of grease sitting in my grease gun all year round. With that being said I really don’t want a puddle of goo dripping from my grease gun all over my tool box drawer or garage floor. Here are the specs of a few greases that I’ve been looking at. What do you guys think about each one… Cheers Liquid Wrench Marine grease. NLGI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: GC-LB Soap type: Calcium Sulfonate Texture: smooth Color: red Dropping Point (F): 554 Oil Separation % 0.2 Timken OK loads: 65 Water Washout: 2.8 Leakage tendencies: 6 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 100 Viscosity @ 100c: 11.2 Flash Point (F): 435 I was impressed with some of the number from liquid wrench, I kept looking pass them, cause I thought to myself that they wouldn’t be a leader in grease. Not sure why I thought that, but looks like it has excellent water resistance, high Timken loads and dropping point. Seems to lose a lot of viscosity @ 100c. So what is wrong with this grease? From the numbers… likes like a great grease to me. Bel-Ray waterproof grease NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Aluminum and Barium Complex Texture: Fibrous Color: Green Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation % N/A Timken OK loads: N/A Water Washout: 4.2 Leakage tendencies: N/A Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 170 Viscosity @ 100c: 15.3 Index: N/A Flash Point (F): N/A Useful Temp. Range (F): -40 to 350 As with this one, high water resistance, but seems to thin out at higher temps. I would be concerned if I was packing my truck and trailer wheel bearings with this and having the brakes heat up and the grease thinning out… Just my two cents Schaeffer #274 NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Aluminum Complex Texture: N/A Color: N/A Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation %: 2 Timken OK loads: 60 Water Washout: 5.4 Leakage tendencies (grams): .6 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 152 Viscosity @ 100c: 14.83 Index: 105 Flash Point (F): 530 Useful Temp. Range (F): -45 to 350 Reading from the website, #274 sounds like a great multi-purpose grease. Other than that, this grease looks like it can hold its own. I did not see a NLGI certification listed for this grease, is it recommended to be used on on-highway vehicles and suspension components? Valvoline Synpower Grease NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Lithium Complex Texture: Buttery Color: gray-Black Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation % N/A Timken OK loads: 60 Water Washout: N/A Leakage tendencies: N/A Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: N/A Viscosity @ 100c: 12 Index: 135 Flash Point (F): N/A Useful Temp. Range (F): N/A This grease is listed to be used in disc brake wheel bearings, doesn’t list its operating temps or water washout. I had high hopes for this grease, but Valvoline was lacking on the product specs for this product, leaving me to move on to something else or just use it for basic general purpose. Valvoline’s Palladium Grease NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Lithium Complex w/ 3% Molybdenum Disulfide Texture: Smooth, Tacky Color: Grey Dropping Point (F): 460-500 Oil Separation %: 6 Timken OK loads: 55 Water Washout: 5 Leakage tendencies: 2 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: N/A Viscosity @ 100c: N/A Flash Point (F): 400 Useful Temp. Range (F): N/A Then again, Valvoline is lacking on their product info, but they are saying, “It displaces other greases as a top-of-the-line quality products for severe applications and general purpose lubrication.” Recommended for all types of bearings and slide applications. Although it has a low flash point, I’m not sure if I want my front disc brakes or trailer brakes packed in it and rolling down a steep decline for a long time while having to ride my brakes… That would have me a little concerned. Not listing a NLGI certification, not sure if it is even suitable for disk brake wheel bearings. But for a Lithium complex it has GREAT water resistant properties!  Schaeffer #221 Moly Ultra EP NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Aluminum Complex Texture: Fibrous Color: N/A Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation % 1.5 Timken OK loads: 60 Water Washout: 4.2 Leakage tendencies (grams): .6 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 244.9 Viscosity @ 100c: 19.7 Index: 105 Flash Point (F): 530 Useful Temp. Range (F): 0-350 This looks like a very think grease, with a high flash point. Great water resistance and high Timken loads. It has a high, low end temperature rang though. So not sure if it would be good in an outdoor climate where I am located. Seems like it would be a great wheel bearing grease on my truck and trailer, with the high flash point and high water resistance. Not sure if it would be recommended in my climate though, due to its temperature rating. Redline CV-2 NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: GC-LB Soap type: Non-soap Texture: N/A Color: red Dropping Point (F): 900+ Oil Separation %: 5 Timken OK loads: N/A Load Wear Index: 71.2 Water Washout: 1% @ 105 degrees Leakage tendencies: N/A Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: N/A Viscosity @ 100c: N/A Flash Point (F): N/A Useful Temp. Range (F): -100 to 500 I saved this one till last, because redline is making out that this is the best stuff on the planet. Saying it will increase bearing life up to 200%, about as close to waterproof as you can get with 1% washout… A temp range that you can use anywhere on earth, and a dropping point of 900. Why would anyone even consider any other type of grease…? It’s almost hard to believe. So with all that I listed, what are your thoughts about the greases I pointed out, good for wheel bearings and marine applications? Is there one grease I could be happy with or do I need to have a small verity? Any concerns that I left out or facts I forget to mention?
 
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Hello, and welcome to the forum. The issue here Keith are the applications in question are virtually disparate, and it's going to be difficult for a "one-size-fits-all" product to satisfactorily deliver solid performance everywhere. Deere Multi-Purpose SD Polyurea would be my general pick.
 
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Well, I use Synpower for 99% of my automotive applications (except for poly bushings, those get Superlube) and have found it to be an excellent grease. Even "stays" well in various joints that historically have had fairly empty boots even after a short service interval. Additionally, I'm pretty confident that it is NOT rated for marine applications? Otherwise, we have used everything from Yamaha to Sta-Lube marine greases without problems on the pontoon outboard and trailer bearings. Always heard real good stuff about the Schaeffer's around here but don't have any experience. If I wanted a top notch marine grease that would probably be one of my starting points.
 
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Once talked to the captain of a nuclear sub and he said the ONLY grease that they tried to use that really remained water-proof (resistant) in salt water over time was an aluminum based grease. After that, it was all I ever used in my trailer Bearing Buddies for my boat launced in salt water and never had an issue.
 
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Schaeffer's 274 is what I use in my vehicles. It is true that there is no universal grease, but this is one of their more popular greases that has a lot of applications. I know a local dairy that uses it because their liquid manure speader lost a bearing on another full synthetic grease brand because it didn't resist water washout. I would recommend buying a tube either at a retailer, through salesrep here on the forum, or online somewhere. With that tube take a small amount and smear it into the palm of your hand. Add some water and try to incorporate it. It won't ever get lighter in color demonstrating that the grease is indeed waterproof. Repeat with your current grease and see what happens.
 

keithcuda

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Has anyone used the liquid wrench marine grease? From their numbers, it looks like a really good marine grease with excellent resistance to water washout.. I am still impressed by the numbers from redline... It looks like it dominates all the other greases that I listed here. Is the #274 good for disc brake wheel bearings, that are under heavy load from braking. I see that it has a rating of 350 degrees. Is that considered low for when bearings? Does a grease need a NLGI certification? If one is not listed, is it still safe/recommended to use on your car's suspension?
 
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Originally Posted By: keithcuda
Has anyone used the liquid wrench marine grease? From their numbers, it looks like a really good marine grease with excellent resistance to water washout.
Water Washout @ 175°F: Liquid Wrench Marine - 2.8% Deere SD Polyurea - 2%
 
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Originally Posted By: Ramblejam
Originally Posted By: keithcuda
Has anyone used the liquid wrench marine grease? From their numbers, it looks like a really good marine grease with excellent resistance to water washout.
Water Washout @ 175°F: Liquid Wrench Marine - 2.8% Deere SD Polyurea - 2%
Deere HD Water Resistant 4% It would appear that there is more to a marine grease than water resistance. The Polyurea is "For excellent protection in corrosive and wet conditions." The Water Resistant specifically lists salt water, which leads me to believe that if you are operating in fresh water, the SD Urea would be better than a "marine" grease. If you are operating in salt water, a grease specially formulated for saltwater corrosion would be better. Which brings us to John Deere Multi-Purpose Extreme Duty Synthetic Grease. It has a 4% water washout, but is listed for saltwater marine use, and will fill the OP's other uses nicely. This is Super Lube. John Deere Grease Ed
 
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Originally Posted By: SVTCobra
Schaeffer's 274 is what I use in my vehicles. It is true that there is no universal grease, but this is one of their more popular greases that has a lot of applications. I know a local dairy that uses it because their liquid manure speader lost a bearing on another full synthetic grease brand because it didn't resist water washout. I would recommend buying a tube either at a retailer, through salesrep here on the forum, or online somewhere. With that tube take a small amount and smear it into the palm of your hand. Add some water and try to incorporate it. It won't ever get lighter in color demonstrating that the grease is indeed waterproof. Repeat with your current grease and see what happens.
It is possible for someone to buy ONE single tube of Schaeffer's grease??? shrug
 
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Absolutely albeit the price per tube will not be the best. Have to keep in mind that Schaeffer's targets commercial users more than the retail market.
 
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Originally Posted By: SVTCobra
Absolutely albeit the price per tube will not be the best. Have to keep in mind that Schaeffer's targets commercial users more than the retail market.
Yes, that's why I asked, as I always understood it to be a multi-case lot ordered item ONLY.
 
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Anyone use TRC products? I had been using TRC 880 crown & chassis as a general grease and CAT desert gold in heavy equipment pins and bushings. No complaints with either one other than the desert gold does get a little stiff in sub zero winter temps. I switched this spring to TRC Paragon 3000 as I'm trying to get by with just one grease to keep in stock. http://www.texasrefinery.com/assets/paragon-3000-tomorrows-grease-today.pdf
 
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Originally Posted By: keithcuda
So I came to find this website, due to a search for a good marine grease. For my trailer wheel bearings, and other service areas on my boat and Jet Ski, i.e. pivot points, steering linkage, drive shaft splines for my jet pump and gimbal bearing on lower unit. After spending hours of research on the net and reading post after post on this forum. I am still as lost as I was when I started… From people saying grease with a lithium complex base isn’t good for being waterproof, but Bel-Rays extreme waterproof grease is a lithium base with water washout @ 4.2. Among other high water resistant greases that were lithium based. Aluminum complex greases were the best at being ‘waterproof”, to reading that calcium sulfonate was ranked the best for water washout!! So what am I trying to get at… Well what is the best “marine grade grease” and if it is that great at protecting marine components, can I use it on my truck and car as well. For example, wheel bearings, u-joints and suspicion components. Take for granted that I do all of my maintenance on my vehicles and I might have a tube of grease sitting in my grease gun all year round. With that being said I really don’t want a puddle of goo dripping from my grease gun all over my tool box drawer or garage floor. Here are the specs of a few greases that I’ve been looking at. What do you guys think about each one… Cheers Liquid Wrench Marine grease. NLGI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: GC-LB Soap type: Calcium Sulfonate Texture: smooth Color: red Dropping Point (F): 554 Oil Separation % 0.2 Timken OK loads: 65 Water Washout: 2.8 Leakage tendencies: 6 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 100 Viscosity @ 100c: 11.2 Flash Point (F): 435 I was impressed with some of the number from liquid wrench, I kept looking pass them, cause I thought to myself that they wouldn’t be a leader in grease. Not sure why I thought that, but looks like it has excellent water resistance, high Timken loads and dropping point. Seems to lose a lot of viscosity @ 100c. So what is wrong with this grease? From the numbers… likes like a great grease to me. Bel-Ray waterproof grease NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Aluminum and Barium Complex Texture: Fibrous Color: Green Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation % N/A Timken OK loads: N/A Water Washout: 4.2 Leakage tendencies: N/A Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 170 Viscosity @ 100c: 15.3 Index: N/A Flash Point (F): N/A Useful Temp. Range (F): -40 to 350 As with this one, high water resistance, but seems to thin out at higher temps. I would be concerned if I was packing my truck and trailer wheel bearings with this and having the brakes heat up and the grease thinning out… Just my two cents Schaeffer #274 NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Aluminum Complex Texture: N/A Color: N/A Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation %: 2 Timken OK loads: 60 Water Washout: 5.4 Leakage tendencies (grams): .6 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 152 Viscosity @ 100c: 14.83 Index: 105 Flash Point (F): 530 Useful Temp. Range (F): -45 to 350 Reading from the website, #274 sounds like a great multi-purpose grease. Other than that, this grease looks like it can hold its own. I did not see a NLGI certification listed for this grease, is it recommended to be used on on-highway vehicles and suspension components? Valvoline Synpower Grease NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Lithium Complex Texture: Buttery Color: gray-Black Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation % N/A Timken OK loads: 60 Water Washout: N/A Leakage tendencies: N/A Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: N/A Viscosity @ 100c: 12 Index: 135 Flash Point (F): N/A Useful Temp. Range (F): N/A This grease is listed to be used in disc brake wheel bearings, doesn’t list its operating temps or water washout. I had high hopes for this grease, but Valvoline was lacking on the product specs for this product, leaving me to move on to something else or just use it for basic general purpose. Valvoline’s Palladium Grease NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Lithium Complex w/ 3% Molybdenum Disulfide Texture: Smooth, Tacky Color: Grey Dropping Point (F): 460-500 Oil Separation %: 6 Timken OK loads: 55 Water Washout: 5 Leakage tendencies: 2 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: N/A Viscosity @ 100c: N/A Flash Point (F): 400 Useful Temp. Range (F): N/A Then again, Valvoline is lacking on their product info, but they are saying, “It displaces other greases as a top-of-the-line quality products for severe applications and general purpose lubrication.” Recommended for all types of bearings and slide applications. Although it has a low flash point, I’m not sure if I want my front disc brakes or trailer brakes packed in it and rolling down a steep decline for a long time while having to ride my brakes… That would have me a little concerned. Not listing a NLGI certification, not sure if it is even suitable for disk brake wheel bearings. But for a Lithium complex it has GREAT water resistant properties!  Schaeffer #221 Moly Ultra EP NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: N/A Soap type: Aluminum Complex Texture: Fibrous Color: N/A Dropping Point (F): >500 Oil Separation % 1.5 Timken OK loads: 60 Water Washout: 4.2 Leakage tendencies (grams): .6 Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: 244.9 Viscosity @ 100c: 19.7 Index: 105 Flash Point (F): 530 Useful Temp. Range (F): 0-350 This looks like a very think grease, with a high flash point. Great water resistance and high Timken loads. It has a high, low end temperature rang though. So not sure if it would be good in an outdoor climate where I am located. Seems like it would be a great wheel bearing grease on my truck and trailer, with the high flash point and high water resistance. Not sure if it would be recommended in my climate though, due to its temperature rating. Redline CV-2 NLCI Grade: 2 NLGI Certification: GC-LB Soap type: Non-soap Texture: N/A Color: red Dropping Point (F): 900+ Oil Separation %: 5 Timken OK loads: N/A Load Wear Index: 71.2 Water Washout: 1% @ 105 degrees Leakage tendencies: N/A Base Oil Properties: Viscosity @ 40c: N/A Viscosity @ 100c: N/A Flash Point (F): N/A Useful Temp. Range (F): -100 to 500 I saved this one till last, because redline is making out that this is the best stuff on the planet. Saying it will increase bearing life up to 200%, about as close to waterproof as you can get with 1% washout… A temp range that you can use anywhere on earth, and a dropping point of 900. Why would anyone even consider any other type of grease…? It’s almost hard to believe. So with all that I listed, what are your thoughts about the greases I pointed out, good for wheel bearings and marine applications? Is there one grease I could be happy with or do I need to have a small verity? Any concerns that I left out or facts I forget to mention?
After a long study of many greases available, I called a Chevron lube tech to verify my choice. The tech led me to Delo EP 2. I've been using the same grease for approximately 30 years. I use it for marine, automotive, and lawn power equipment.Mystik JT-6 Hi-Temp is a close second.
 
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100% agreement with Gillsy. Mystik JT-6 Hi-Temp Lithium Complex #2 and Chevron Delo L/C #2 are excellent. I use either one on trucks, tractors and autos. Both are GC/LB certified, both are used by many truck fleets, nor does either contain moly. Many people won't use moly for wheel bearings or universal joints, although I think either is available with the moly added for applications calling for moly. An added benefit of the lithium greases is that it's compatible with many other bases, if that means anything to you. It doesn't to me because I won't mix bases. Now, I have nothing against other grease bases. My old work car is a Japan-built Camry I purchased new almost 20 years and 325,000 miles back. I've only had to replace 1 of the sealed wheel bearings & the car operates in a very dusty rural high-desert environment...and those bearings are not lubricated with L/C.
 
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All I can say is avoid compatibility issues by sticking with the same stuff. Was reading these posts and other threads and ready to buy a new grease. Figure it is best to just get the same one that's in my gun now. Was looking for a multi purpose for - truck steering - mower spindles
 

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Originally Posted By: SVTCobra
Schaeffer's 274 is what I use in my vehicles. It is true that there is no universal grease, but this is one of their more popular greases that has a lot of applications. I know a local dairy that uses it because their liquid manure speader lost a bearing on another full synthetic grease brand because it didn't resist water washout. I would recommend buying a tube either at a retailer, through salesrep here on the forum, or online somewhere. With that tube take a small amount and smear it into the palm of your hand. Add some water and try to incorporate it. It won't ever get lighter in color demonstrating that the grease is indeed waterproof. Repeat with your current grease and see what happens.
It is possible for someone to buy ONE single tube of Schaeffer's grease??? shrug
Yes. There are a couple of retailers on line and there may be a retailer near you as well.
 
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