T6 5w40 vs Pennzoil Plat Euro 5w40

Aren’t the foaming requirements per ASTM D6082 nearly identical between gasoline and diesel oils with an API license? In fact isn’t the diesel one is a bit more stringent?
I'm still wondering why some refuse to use the correct oil for their application. For example, @edyvw recommended MB 229.5 approved motor oil. Most, but not all MB 229.5 motor oils also carry a Porsche A40 approval which doesn't allow for any foaming of the motor oil. It's just easier and safer to use what works best for an engine and allows the owner to get the most useful life out of it versus what's perceived to work best.
 
How many miles has Rotella served semi drivers over the years? Millions????

I don't get your point. An oil formulated for a big diesel with a massive sump that spends 90% of its life cruising at 1500-2000 rpm is not going to be good for a gas engine turning 3x the rpm with 1/5th the sump capacity. That's not even touching the differences in detergent chemistry against gas/ethanol dilution vs diesel dilution or dispersant chemistry catered to the dirtier sooty environment of a diesel engine's crankcase.

Here's a metaphor. Orange oil makes a good degreaser that'll remove caked on dirt and other crud from wood surfaces without damaging the finish. So you think, if it performed so well on that wood table, it'll work good at removing the oil stains on my concrete driveway. So you pour it on and freak out after it starts eating the concrete. You're using a product outside the scope of its chemistry which almost never ends well.
 
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I have been a Rotella fan forever... but recently, when you compare prices with a jug that has 4 quarts vs a jug that has 5 quarts, it causes you to ..... shop.

Just a trip into wally world and compare Rotella 4 qt to all the other 5qt is an eye opener. I am finding myself going to the 5qts......


.....

Yep. A 5 gallon jug of Mobil 1 FS Euro 5W-40 is cheaper per quart than a 4 gallon jug of Rotella T6 5W-40 while having a much better additive package in better base oils, lower volatility, more shear stable, less prone to foam, etc...
 
I don't get your point. An oil formulated for a big diesel with a massive sump that spends 90% of its life cruising at 1500-2000 rpm is not going to be good for a gas engine turning 3x the rpm with 1/5th the sump capacity. That's not even touching the differences in detergent chemistry against gas/ethanol dilution vs diesel dilution or dispersant chemistry catered to the dirtier sooty environment of a diesel engine's crankcase.

Here's a metaphor. Orange oil makes a good degreaser that'll remove caked on dirt and other crud from wood surfaces without damaging the finish. So you think, if it performed so well on that wood table, it'll work good at removing the oil stains on my concrete driveway. So you pour it on and freak out after it starts eating the concrete. You're using a product outside the scope of its chemistry which almost never ends well.
Let me tell you something. I have been using these Rotella products on my and friends vehicles for multiple years and multiple thousands of miles. In the appropriate application --- very hard to beat. Will continue to use Rotella moving forward.
20240513_155153.jpg
 
Let me tell you something. I have been using these Rotella products on my and friends vehicles for multiple years and multiple thousands of miles. In the appropriate application --- very hard to beat. Will continue to use Rotella moving forward.View attachment 219213

That's fine. You can use whatever you want. You're stubbornness is not of logical conviction. Therefore, this discussion will inevitably end in an impasse so I won't attempt to convince you any further.
 
Just trust the bros, bros. Whether it's real or misleading, that matters not. Notice how people who get called out for posting misinformation and alternative facts can't be bothered to correct the initial posts with a disclaimer.



Bickering posts have been deleted. Let’s stay on topic, please.
Astro, you know I love ya - but these folks just bicker to bicker.... you'd have to lock every post in this section to stop the one-upmanship since everyone is so much smarter than the other puny mortals (who are also immortal and genuisses's) they bicker with.



(he probably didn't know I loved him, great, now everybody knows)
 
Let me tell you something. I have been using these Rotella products on my and friends vehicles for multiple years and multiple thousands of miles. In the appropriate application --- very hard to beat. Will continue to use Rotella moving forward.View attachment 219213
I see all your vehicles are 700hp plus, spinning some 7-8000rpm.
Now that I think, considering your vehicles, Costco Extra Virgin oil might do too.
 
In all seriousness, to me it does kind of make sense to stick with oils formulated for gas vehicles in gas vehicles, and oils formulated for diesels in diesel vehicles. I don't have a diesel and I decided that M1 0w-40 Euro was the right choice for my four vehicles. That's a 6.0 vortec iron block, hyd roller Pontiac V8, 4.0 Jeep flat tappet, and 396 chevy flat tappet. Sufficient zinc and phosphorus for the flat tappets, great cold starts on the Pontiac which is known to shear oil pump drives on cold starts, and thick enough at temperature for anything I will throw at them.
 
I’d assume the JASO MA/MA2 has a decent foaming requirement too.

Nope. JASO is a really weak spec. Foaming limits are pathetic at 10/50/10. (and T6 still failed it in a recent test) It also allows up to 15% Noack, a minimum HTHS of 2.9 cP (for a 40 grade, mind you), and shear stability limits so weak that the oil can shear out of grade and still pass. The only testing it has that CK-4 doesn't is dynamic and static friction clutch testing, and even that has a wide tolerance. An oil can fail every parameter of both CK-4 and SP but still pass MA2.

I've worked with quite a few motorcycle riders who, after some spirited riding, would have valvetrain noise and clutch chatter with Rotella T. Even 30+ seconds after shutting it off, you could look in the sight hole and see nothing but foam. Switching to a better oil clears it up.

This is why I have little respect or value for most certs and approvals. ACEA and European OEM approvals are about the only ones I give any sort of merit.
 
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Aren’t the foaming requirements per ASTM D6082 nearly identical between gasoline and diesel oils with an API license? In fact isn’t the diesel one is a bit more stringent?
ASTM D892:
Sequence I: 24C
Sequence II: 94C
Sequence III: 24C

ASTM D6082:
Sequence IV: 150C


CJ-4:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 20/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

API SP:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 50/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

ASTM D6082 tendency/stability ml
Sequence IV: 100/0 max

ACEA 2016:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 50/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

ASTM D6082 tendency/stability ml
Sequence IV: 100/0 max

Mercedes 229.3/229.31/229.5/229.51/229.52/229.6/229.61/229.71:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 20/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

ASTM D6082 tendency/stability ml
Sequence IV: 100/0 max


So, it looks like D892, CJ-4 is more stringent, but CJ-4 doesn't test D6082 at 150C. Most of the MB certs push the same D892 limits but include the D6082 150C test.
 
ASTM D892:
Sequence I: 24C
Sequence II: 94C
Sequence III: 24C

ASTM D6082:
Sequence IV: 150C


CJ-4:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 20/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

API SP:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 50/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

ASTM D6082 tendency/stability ml
Sequence IV: 100/0 max

ACEA 2016:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 50/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

ASTM D6082 tendency/stability ml
Sequence IV: 100/0 max

Mercedes 229.3/229.31/229.5/229.51/229.52/229.6/229.61/229.71:
ASTM D892 tendency/stability ml
Sequence I: 10/0 max
Sequence II: 20/0 max
Sequence III: 10/0 max

ASTM D6082 tendency/stability ml
Sequence IV: 100/0 max


So, it looks like D892, CJ-4 is more stringent, but CJ-4 doesn't test D6082 at 150C. Most of the MB certs push the same D892 limits but include the D6082 150C test.
Do you happen to know what the Porsche A40 foaming requirements are?
 
I don't get your point. An oil formulated for a big diesel with a massive sump that spends 90% of its life cruising at 1500-2000 rpm is not going to be good for a gas engine turning 3x the rpm with 1/5th the sump capacity. That's not even touching the differences in detergent chemistry against gas/ethanol dilution vs diesel dilution or dispersant chemistry catered to the dirtier sooty environment of a diesel engine's crankcase.

Here's a metaphor. Orange oil makes a good degreaser that'll remove caked on dirt and other crud from wood surfaces without damaging the finish. So you think, if it performed so well on that wood table, it'll work good at removing the oil stains on my concrete driveway. So you pour it on and freak out after it starts eating the concrete. You're using a product outside the scope of its chemistry which almost never ends well.
I absolutely agree with this. That is why when I hear the "the same oil that NASCAR race cars use" falls on deaf ears with me too.

I also love that anyone is free to use what they want. You don't have to justify your choices to anyone.
 
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