" Some Group III base oils outperform POA based Group IV"

OVERKILL

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I thought it always contained poe? I recently read the popular science article on synthetic oils from april 1976 and the mobil engineers did state they used poe to balance out pao being hard on seals. Not that it matters as that was so long ago. Just curious
My recollection is that the first version of the product wasn't properly balanced enough and indeed had some negative interactions with seals. They fixed that with POE.

That said, it may have always contained POE, but perhaps not enough initially?
 
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I thought it always contained poe? I recently read the popular science article on synthetic oils from april 1976 and the mobil engineers did state they used poe to balance out pao being hard on seals. Not that it matters as that was so long ago. Just curious

My recollection is that the first version of the product wasn't properly balanced enough and indeed had some negative interactions with seals. They fixed that with POE.

That said, it may have always contained POE, but perhaps not enough initially?

How was AMSOIL performing during that period?
 

easym

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I would like to know an official scientific definition of a synthetic motor oil from someone who is a Chemist/Tribologist. Not advertisement propaganda. Furthermore; Pennzoil doesn't state the manufacturer of the quoted statement. Just a thought!
 
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I would like to know an official scientific definition of a synthetic motor oil from someone who is a Chemist/Tribologist. Not advertisement propaganda. Furthermore; Pennzoil doesn't state the manufacturer of the quoted statement. Just a thought!


 
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Many don’t realize the wealth of information here. From the main forum page click on the HOME button at the top of the page.
Indeed! Thank you sir...

Just a small quote. Better perspective anyway.

"A synthetic chemical is then made from the ground up in the laboratory or the chemical processing plant by the process of synthesis, as differentiated from refinement or extraction.

A synthetic base oil is produced from well-defined, carefully chosen chemical compounds, and by a specific chain of chemical reactions. A molecularly engineered base stock is optimized for viscosity index, pour point, volatility, oxidative stability, flash point, shear stability, and other desirable properties. Classified as API Group IV and Group V base oils.

The use of the word “synthetic” in the lubricants industry has historically been synonymous with polymerized base oils such as poly-alpha olefins (PAOs), Esters, and other synthesized base oils, such as alkylated naphthalenes (AN), which are made from selected starting atoms or molecules."
 
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Indeed! Thank you sir...

Just a small quote. Better perspective anyway.

"A synthetic chemical is then made from the ground up in the laboratory or the chemical processing plant by the process of synthesis, as differentiated from refinement or extraction.

A synthetic base oil is produced from well-defined, carefully chosen chemical compounds, and by a specific chain of chemical reactions. A molecularly engineered base stock is optimized for viscosity index, pour point, volatility, oxidative stability, flash point, shear stability, and other desirable properties. Classified as API Group IV and Group V base oils.

The use of the word “synthetic” in the lubricants industry has historically been synonymous with polymerized base oils such as poly-alpha olefins (PAOs), Esters, and other synthesized base oils, such as alkylated naphthalenes (AN), which are made from selected starting atoms or molecules."


Where is this quote from?
 
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Red Line Oil has about 1200 ppm of Phosphorus, ~500 ppm Moly, and ~3200 ppm of Calcium. Their High-Performance line is not API licensed, yet they still want to reformulate their lineup, specifically their 0W-20 and 0W-30, and offer a 0W-16 with improved protection against LSPI events. That's what I was told by them a few months ago. Why do you think they would alter something that has worked for them for so long?

Likely because of the esters they are using. Ester can have a positive or negative effect on LSPI depending on which ester is used. It could be that they are switching ester base / feedstock to get around potential shortages in base oil material or due to cost. It could also be that they are trying to appeal to a market that views anything with >1500 ppm Ca as bad.
 
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