Should I use any additives in a Jetta tdi

I don't believe my Jetta has a way to plug it in. Which I was kind of surprised about. I thought plugging in a diesel when it was cold was common practice.🤷
It may of just not been selected when it was ordered from the factory. There may be one available for you car. I don't know much on the car side though as I've only ran trucks. lol

Either way, you may not need them so long as you make sure to keep the glow plugs etc in good shape. Replace the Glow Plugs every 100k. I'll tell you why. You leave them in long enough & you might need to remove the head b/c the GP is stuck. Maintenance goes a long way that's for sure. What year is your VW?
 
Only thing you need is anti-gel. I personally use Howe’s. No need for anything else.

Diesels like clean fuel especially the new HPCR. Buy fuel at stations that move a lot of fuel. Change your fuel filter as prescribed in your owners manual.

Just my $0.02
 
It may of just not been selected when it was ordered from the factory. There may be one available for you car. I don't know much on the car side though as I've only ran trucks. lol

Either way, you may not need them so long as you make sure to keep the glow plugs etc in good shape. Replace the Glow Plugs every 100k. I'll tell you why. You leave them in long enough & you might need to remove the head b/c the GP is stuck. Maintenance goes a long way that's for sure. What year is your VW?
It's a 2013. I believe the glow plugs are original.
 
We move a a lot of Stanadyne Performance Formula. It’s has everything you’d want and only adds about 10-12 cents per gallon to fuel cost. Most guys find they get enough mileage improvement using it to more than pay for it.
 
my dad occasionally runs 2 stroke oil in his common rail diesels, he has an old 1.9 mechanical injection Jetta TDI with 370,000 miles on it. i don't think he runs additives in it though. newer diesels start easier in the cold, but a block heater will still help, and with a block heater you get interior heat faster. i think diesel sold in the winter has anti gel in it, but I live in Arizona so i don't have experience with cold diesels. the Jetta starts fine and it has atleast 1 burnt out glow plug, they were last replaced at 100k miles so they're probably seized.
 
my dad occasionally runs 2 stroke oil in his common rail diesels, he has an old 1.9 mechanical injection Jetta TDI with 370,000 miles on it. i don't think he runs additives in it though. newer diesels start easier in the cold, but a block heater will still help, and with a block heater you get interior heat faster. i think diesel sold in the winter has anti gel in it, but I live in Arizona so i don't have experience with cold diesels. the Jetta starts fine and it has atleast 1 burnt out glow plug, they were last replaced at 100k miles so they're probably seized.
2 stroke oil is a poor choice for lubricity and the longevity of any aftertreatment devices.

Even when it gets like -10 that seems to happen every couple of years? Teens and 20s are common on and off all winter.
It doesn't hurt to have one and they're very easy to install. I haven't used mine this year.
 
2 stroke oil is a poor choice for lubricity and the longevity of any aftertreatment devices.


It doesn't hurt to have one and they're very easy to install. I haven't used mine this year.
I need to look up how they install I guess. Wouldn't mind buying one.
 
esp. not in MO.
Avg January low in Cleveland, Ohio is 22F. Avg January low in California, Missouri is 20F. This was just a quick search on the Governments climate website. It can get cold here for long stretches. Last year when we seen that very cold blast from the north my weather station measured -13F.
 
Avg January low in Cleveland, Ohio is 22F. Avg January low in California, Missouri is 20F. This was just a quick search on the Governments climate website. It can get cold here for long stretches. Last year when we seen that very cold blast from the north my weather station measured -13F.
Yep we had a pretty good cold snap last year.
 
I put over a quarter million miles on my Jetta in eleven years living in Chicago and criss crossing the US.
I used an additive every fill, 10k oci w/Delvac 5w40, fuel filters every year, and sold it to a guy who went well over 300 I’m told.
So, yeah, I’d use good fuel additives in your case.
 
I only have 318,200 miles on my Jetta, so too soon to tell. So far, so good, the engine does not use oil between oil changes. I use about 4 oz of Power Service in the gray bottle every fill up. Sometimes I add a quart of biodiesel. I also change the oil every 5,000 miles with M1 TDT. I have never used an anti-gel additive even though it has seen temperatures of 10 degrees or less. The anti-gel additives, like Power Service in the white bottle are for cold weather, basically below zero. However, you can use a lesser amount at 32 and below.

Winter diesel is a different formulation than summer diesel, especially in cold weather areas.
 
2 stroke oil is a poor choice for lubricity and the longevity of any aftertreatment devices.


It doesn't hurt to have one and they're very easy to install. I haven't used mine this year.
no emissions devices on this car, it's too old. and while diesel isn't as lubricative as it used to be, many cars do fine on new diesel without any additives.
 
Stanadyne One-Shot All-season was the approved VW fuel additive for diesel gelling back in 2004.

Additives on handling water comes in 3 flavors: 1) Demulsifier, 2) Emulsifier & 3) Solubilzer.
Power Service is a solubizer, which gets the water mixed back into solution with the diesel fuel
Emulsifier turns it into something like italian dressing, where the water particles are suspended in the diesel fuel. So, when it gets to the fuel filter, the water is absorbed into the cellulose media and when the car is parked, the fuel filter media can freeze up, impeding fuel flow.
Demulsifier separates the water from diesel.

I believe Stanadyne is an emulsifier.
 
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