Piping for gas (natural or propane)

Messages
25,814
Location
Upstate NY
I am putting some pipe together to supply propane for my generator. The prior owner used black iron pipe and had the little "trap" I often see on natural gas lines in houses. I assume its to catch rust particles but am not sure. Is it needed to propane also? Any other tricks?
 
Messages
1,502
Location
Ohio
Yep, black pipe is used for propane as well. The trap is to catch rust or anything solid that happens to come through the line. Use pipe dope or the YELLOW Teflon tape to seal the threads, and check for leaks with soap water.
 
Messages
3,044
Yes....black pipe for me on a smaller run to a BBQ but I prefer a sleeved run of flexible insulated copper for my generator. PITA to get in but once in your done!!!
 

Donald

Thread starter
Messages
25,814
Location
Upstate NY
Coming off the generator is 3/4" black pipe for several inches. But after that I will connect a 15' hose with 3/8" fittings. Right now I am only planning on testing the generator with a 100 lb propane cylinder.
 

Donald

Thread starter
Messages
25,814
Location
Upstate NY
Originally Posted By: wsar10
I would check that trap annually, for moisture as-well as sediment.
I thought it was nearly impossible to get black pipe apart (once assembled) especially since this will be outside.
 
Messages
2,008
Location
grande prairie AB
Originally Posted By: Donald
Originally Posted By: wsar10
I would check that trap annually, for moisture as-well as sediment.
I thought it was nearly impossible to get black pipe apart (once assembled) especially since this will be outside.
no quite easy actually. especially since you have to seal the threads with dope or tape. It acts as a lube as well.
 
Messages
2,081
Location
California
Black pipe will rust, and rust quickly if it's exposed to moisture, and I assume there's plenty of that in upstate New York. So you should either paint it, and keep an eye out for corrosion, or used galvanized pipe. Don't bury black pipe in the ground, use the coated pipe that's made for that. And use any color teflon tape you like.
 

Donald

Thread starter
Messages
25,814
Location
Upstate NY
Originally Posted By: Stelth
Black pipe will rust, and rust quickly if it's exposed to moisture, and I assume there's plenty of that in upstate New York. So you should either paint it, and keep an eye out for corrosion, or used galvanized pipe. Don't bury black pipe in the ground, use the coated pipe that's made for that. And use any color teflon tape you like.
One should never used galvanized pipe for gas. Chunks of galvanizing can break free and flow down the pipe.
 
Messages
9,797
Location
Central Coast, Calif.
FYI, galv. Pipe is specifically allowed by both national code governing bodies for either type of gas service. If there was a real issue with flaking at least one of them wouldn't allow it. If you install drip legs the chances of debris getting into your appliance is pretty slim.
 
Messages
693
Location
PA
This is true about the Galv., a drip leg (sediment trap) should prevent debris in an orface. I would probably use an alternative, I was in the plumbing and heating business for roughly 15yrs (10 of them with my own business) and I have seen EVERY worst case scenario with galvanized, [censored] part is some municipality's REQUIRE it for outdoor line. as far as iron pipe coming apart I ALWAYS use pipe dope vs tape dope this will allow for easy removal .
 
Messages
2,081
Location
California
Originally Posted By: Donald
Originally Posted By: Stelth
Black pipe will rust, and rust quickly if it's exposed to moisture, and I assume there's plenty of that in upstate New York. So you should either paint it, and keep an eye out for corrosion, or used galvanized pipe. Don't bury black pipe in the ground, use the coated pipe that's made for that. And use any color teflon tape you like.
One should never used galvanized pipe for gas. Chunks of galvanizing can break free and flow down the pipe.
When I was first getting started in plumbing, about 30 years ago, I read voraciously whatever books I could get my hands on. I remember reading about this "flaking" thing with galvanized. In 30 years, I've never seen an orifice plugged by a bit of zinc. Of course, I've done most of my plumbing in So Cal, where we have clean, dry gas. In San Diego, galvanized pipe is required anywhere that steel gas pipe will be exposed to weather (at least under 2" pipe size). In Los Angeles, galvanized pipe is not allowed. Go figure. I've also opened a few drip legs that have been in service for decades, and there was nothing in them. However, natural gas isn't the same everywhere, and the same may be true for LP. I think that the presence of hydrogen sulfide in coal gas and/or town gas may have caused problems with galvanized pipe. Not sure on that one.
 
Top