Oil Spec STJLR 51.5122

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I know there have been other discussions on the Jaguar specific oil (Castrol Edge Professional E) meeting the spec STJLR 51.5122, but I wanted to revitalize the discussion. I recently went to my local Jaguar dealership and they advised they are out of stock on that oil, and have been out of stock for a while, and they don't know when to expect more. So I'm searching for an alternative. I use Amsoil in all my other vehicles. The Amsoil "EZT" which is 0W-20 European is an ACEA C5 oil that seems to be comparable but doesn't say it meets the Jaguar / Land Rover spec. I also found the Redline 0W-20 which actually says it meets the STJLR 51.5122 spec. I'm not really interested in using some of the other brands that meet the spec like LiquiMoly (I just have no experience with that brand, and haven't heard much about it). I compared the product data sheets of all three of these oils (Redline, Amsoil, and Castrol) and they seem very comparable (attached). Although the Castrol does have some impressive numbers and seems like a great oil. Of course the additive packages aren't as easy to find and I don't really know what to look for.

The vehicle's engien is a Supercharged 3.0L V6, Direct Injection. The car is a daily driver in all weather. Outside Temps could be as low as -10 or -20F, but more normally something like the 20's and 30's, and as high as 95 to 105F in the summer.

I'm not super technical with this stuff like many people on BITOG are (hence the reason I'm posting)... so my interpretation is that the only benefit to the OE Recommended Castrol is that it has more flowability at VERY low temperatures, but may suffer a little at higher temperatures. Any other differences you experts can point out to me? Anyone see why I couldn't use the Amsoil 0W-20 European "EZT"?
 

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Pick the oil with the proper ratings change it sooner than later, make sure the air filter is of good quality and the intake stays sealed and the engine will out live your ownership of the vehicle. Oil will not help poor quality parts, assembly or engine design.
 
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This is a no-brainer. You should use the Valvoline European-Vehicle Full Synthetic SAE 0W-20. It has the Jaguar STJLR.51.5122 approval, has a modern Ca–Mg mixed detergent (API SN PLUS or higher) for protection against LSPI, is thicker than a SAE 5W-30 (base-oil viscosity HTFS = 2.4 cP), has very little VII (1.5%) for virtually no plastic deposits, and is sold affordably at Amazon.

Gokhan's base-oil viscosity (HTFS) and VII content table

 
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My 2018 Jag 2.0T has Valvoline EP 0W-20 on it. I do 5K OCI m not the Jags recommended 16K m OCI. I don't go for Jag's STJLR.51.5122
 
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Castrol Edge black bottle or gold bottle meets is also ACEA C5 at a lower cost.
C5? Nothing special about it. Most 0W-20 oils, especially dexos1 approved ones, should meet it except for some not meeting the 700 ppm phosphorus minimum (API/ILSAC minimum being 600 ppm). Lower phosphorus actually tends to be better because the blenders use a lot of AW/EP/FM additives to make up for it.

The Jaguar spec should be a lot stricter than C5.

Moreover, unlike API specs which have been updated a long while back, most ACEA specs remain outdated. A5/B5 has been replaced by A7/B7. C5 has been replaced by C6. A7/B7 and C6 are appropriate for TGDI engines with stricter wear and deposit protection as well as LSPI protection. A3/B4 and C3 will remain as legacy high-calcium/no-magnesium specs, with no LSPI, turbocharger, and timing-chain protection for TGDI engines, possibly not using modern detergent packs and/or modern AW/EP/FM additives that reduce wear.

Don't forget that year 2034 marks the end of production for new internal-combustion engines in most parts of the world. So, the oil specs at that point will all be for legacy vehicles. Start thinking about installing EV chargers in your garages!
 

408Stang

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This is a no-brainer. You should use the Valvoline European-Vehicle Full Synthetic SAE 0W-20. It has the Jaguar STJLR.51.5122 approval, has a modern Ca–Mg mixed detergent (API SN PLUS or higher) for protection against LSPI, is thicker than a SAE 5W-30 (base-oil viscosity HTFS = 2.4 cP), has very little VII (1.5%) for virtually no plastic deposits, and is sold affordably at Amazon.

Gokhan's base-oil viscosity (HTFS) and VII content table

Thank you... I hadn't come across the Valvoline in my Googling. I'll check that one out too. I attached the Product Data Sheet if anyone wants to weigh in on it. I did notice that the Valvoline PDS doesn't show what ASTM testing method they used to get their numbers.

No votes for the Amsoil or Red Line huh?

I am very diligent in my OCI's. And I'm very intentional about other maintenance (air filters, clean MAF's, clean TB, tire air pressure, BG44 in the tank every year, etc.) My vehicles all have fairly low mileage and they get changed at 10k or 1 year whichever comes first. Most of my vehicles only get about 5k to 9k miles per year so the OCI is usually at the 1 year mark.

I plan on keeping the Jag for a while so I'm willing to put the best oil money can buy into it.
 

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Thank you... I hadn't come across the Valvoline in my Googling. I'll check that one out too. I attached the Product Data Sheet if anyone wants to weigh in on it. I did notice that the Valvoline PDS doesn't show what ASTM testing method they used to get their numbers.

No votes for the Amsoil or Red Line huh?

I am very diligent in my OCI's. And I'm very intentional about other maintenance (air filters, clean MAF's, clean TB, tire air pressure, BG44 in the tank every year, etc.) My vehicles all have fairly low mileage and they get changed at 10k or 1 year whichever comes first. Most of my vehicles only get about 5k to 9k miles per year so the OCI is usually at the 1 year mark.

I plan on keeping the Jag for a while so I'm willing to put the best oil money can buy into it.
I'm keeping my Jag as well. I do a 5K OCI for timing chain longevity. On my earlier post I put in V/EP 0W-20, Mobil1 and Castrol are OK too. Oh yeah, they wanted you to use that Jag's recommended oil (STJLR.51.5122) and do a 16K mile OCI. That's outrageous, not unless if you wanted your engine not to last long.
If you have a difficulty in finding a battery for your Jag, The Walmart's Everstart Platinum AGM H7 is the right battery for my 2018 XF. Same size as the OEM , but if I searched online nothing comes up for my Jag's battery in all major retail parts stores, even Interstate doesn't list it. It's a trap that you have to buy the battery at the dealer which is $300+. I got mine for $169. Measure your car's first battery or bring it at Walmart & compare the size AGM sold there. It's either it will take a size H7 or H8
 
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No votes for the Amsoil or Red Line huh?

RL says 'recommendation'. That means it's NO approval.
I could be wrong but Amsoil AFE & EZT seem to only say
several 'applications' (NO approval) and I don't see they
don't even mention 'Jaguar' at all. That's probably 'why'.

Personally I'd prefer using some product which provides
official STJLR.51.5122 approval along with MB229.71, BMW
LL-17 FE+ or even VW 508 00/Porsche C20. Preferably true
approvals again.
One example (perhaps one of the best available next to M1):


If they matter (I think they do) their specs are mind-blowing.
.
 
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C5? Nothing special about it. Most 0W-20 oils, especially dexos1 approved ones, should meet it except for some not meeting the 700 ppm phosphorus minimum (API/ILSAC minimum being 600 ppm). Lower phosphorus actually tends to be better because the blenders use a lot of AW/EP/FM additives to make up for it.

The Jaguar spec should be a lot stricter than C5.

Moreover, unlike API specs which have been updated a long while back, most ACEA specs remain outdated. A5/B5 has been replaced by A7/B7. C5 has been replaced by C6. A7/B7 and C6 are appropriate for TGDI engines with stricter wear and deposit protection as well as LSPI protection. A3/B4 and C3 will remain as legacy high-calcium/no-magnesium specs, with no LSPI, turbocharger, and timing-chain protection for TGDI engines, possibly not using modern detergent packs and/or modern AW/EP/FM additives that reduce wear.

Don't forget that year 2034 marks the end of production for new internal-combustion engines in most parts of the world. So, the oil specs at that point will all be for legacy vehicles. Start thinking about installing EV chargers in your garages!
What about the MB229.71 approval? How is that compared to the Jaguar spec?
 
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This is a no-brainer. You should use the Valvoline European-Vehicle Full Synthetic SAE 0W-20. It has the Jaguar STJLR.51.5122 approval, has a modern Ca–Mg mixed detergent (API SN PLUS or higher) for protection against LSPI, is thicker than a SAE 5W-30 (base-oil viscosity HTFS = 2.4 cP), has very little VII (1.5%) for virtually no plastic deposits, and is sold affordably at Amazon.

Gokhan's base-oil viscosity (HTFS) and VII content table

This is what I would do if you want to stick with 0w-20.. These engines are known to be tough on their timing chains. I have the same engine in my LR4 at 128,000 Miles so no warranty concerns and I have run 4 changes of Ravenol ALS 0w-30 Full Synthetic and just put in some Pennzoil Ultra 0w-40 for this and the next few runs... My best advice based on my pretty extensive experience with these engines is no matter which high-quality oil you choose to run do NO run it out past 5,000 miles between changes despite what the fine folks at JLR recommend...
 

408Stang

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RL says 'recommendation'. That means it's NO approval.
I could be wrong but Amsoil AFE & EZT seem to only say
several 'applications' (NO approval) and I don't see they
don't even mention 'Jaguar' at all. That's probably 'why'.

Personally I'd prefer using some product which provides
official STJLR.51.5122 approval along with MB229.71, BMW
LL-17 FE+ or even VW 508 00/Porsche C20. Preferably true
approvals again.
One example (perhaps one of the best available next to M1):


If they matter (I think they do) their specs are mind-blowing.
.
I saw the Ravenol oil too... Again never heard of it, and never heard anybody talk about it. I do note the JLR Spec is approved... So that's something. I attached the Product Data for the Ravenol too... Looks pretty similar to the Castrol Edge Professional E which is the OEM recommended. And I like that Ravenol listed the type of ASTM test they used to get their numbers (not that I know the difference in tests, but it lends some credibility... Unlike the Valvoline)
 

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Another great option is Mobil 1 ESP X2 0W-20. It is 1/3 PAO and 2/3 GTL, likely with a dash of POE. The base oil seems thick, but the lack of specs by Mobil 1 prevents me from running a calculation. It is API SP, which means it has a modern Ca–Mg mixed detergent that is tested for LSPI events and it is also tested for timing-chain wear. There is no Jaguar approval, but there are VW, Porsche, MB, and GM dexosD approvals. Both the M1 ESP X2 0W-20 and Valvoline European 0W-20 should be great choices.

 
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I saw the Ravenol oil too... Again never heard of it, and never heard anybody talk about it. I do note the JLR Spec is approved... So that's something. I attached the Product Data for the Ravenol too... Looks pretty similar to the Castrol Edge Professional E which is the OEM recommended. And I like that Ravenol listed the type of ASTM test they used to get their numbers (not that I know the difference in tests, but it lends some credibility... Unlike the Valvoline)
Just to be clear you don’t approve a spec, you meet it. There are no specification approvals.

If you’re dead set on a 20-grade then picking one with VW 508 00 approval is one of the best.
 
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Just to be clear you don’t approve a spec, you meet it. There are no specification approvals.

If you’re dead set on a 20-grade then picking one with VW 508 00 approval is one of the best.
What makes VW 508.00 approval the best? How is it compared to MB229.71?
 
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What makes VW 508.00 approval the best? How is it compared to MB229.71?
VW 508.00/509.00 is not the best approval. MB 229.71 is hands-down the best.

Ultimately, how premium an oil is determined by its resistance to oxidation, which in turn determines its performance in virtually all areas, especially the longevity and deposits. That said, MB specs champion oxidative performance with a plethora of tests. In comparison, VW specs have minimal tests for oxidative performance.

One common feature of these oils is that their ZDDP content is around 850–900 ppm, which is higher than the ILSAC limit of 800 ppm. That's why they don't get ILSAC approval and why they are not recommended for American and Japanese cars, which put emphasis on emissions and catalytic-converter endurance.
 
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VW 508.00/509.00 is not the best approval. MB 229.71 is hands-down the best.

Ultimately, how premium an oil is determined by its resistance to oxidation, which in turn determines its performance in virtually all areas, especially the longevity and deposits. That said, MB specs champion oxidative performance with a plethora of tests. In comparison, VW specs have minimal tests for oxidative performance.

One common feature of these oils is that their ZDDP content is around 850–900 ppm, which is higher than the ILSAC limit of 800 ppm. That's why they don't get ILSAC approval and why they are not recommended for American and Japanese cars, which put emphasis on emissions and catalytic-converter endurance.
Thank you for the details!
 
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