New brake pad and rotor installation questions

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Perhaps you would do well to buy the additional parts that you would like replaced, maybe the pins, anti-rattle parts and clips. Add them to the other parts that you plan to supply. Ask that the old parts be returned to you and hope the inventory of old parts matches the new that you supplied.
 
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Asking a mech to make sure and do a good job might not sit well with them and could become an awkward conversation with one leaving looking for a new mech.
Kinda what I was thinking.... This would definitely be a touchy subject with any professional (auto mechanic, electrician, HVAC, etc) to question if they do things the way you (or I or someone else) believe is the "right" way. Even at an auto repair shop, if you have (3) mechanics in the same shop, good chance all (3) would do things slightly different. The old fallback of "I've never lubed the clips/brackets in 20 years and never had an issue" is hard to question (whether it's true or not).
 
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You strike me as the type who would pester and annoy any good mechanic to the point that he would either "fire" you as a customer or charge you top dollar.

Brakes aren't hard, watch some youtube videos or take a class at community college or something.
 

rcs

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Yes. Bedding brake pads isn’t a process that is needed is regular passenger car friction materials. Just normal driving and no “hard-panic stops” for 50 miles or so and good to go…
Great good to know I don't have to worry about messing up the rotors!
Asking a mech to make sure and do a good job might not sit well with them and could become an awkward conversation with one leaving looking for a new mech.
Ok,...please let me clarify,..I would never, ever say that to a mechanic "make sure to do a good job" or to anyone else who is a professional in their field. I just wanted information from you guys, besides what I researched on my own as to what to look out for and to get a better understanding of what needs to be done for the installation. I know it is not a hard job.
With that being said, I knew there were some things that did not get done when I had this brake job done before. Slapping on the rotors and the pads to me is not a complete job. Anyone can do that, not me of course being a women! BUT For example, cleaning any rust, making sure the areas are lubed that are supposed to be lubed, making sure the clips fit properly with the new pads and not reusing the old ones from a different manufacturer! We can all agree if your brake job is messed up,...you are either going to kill yourself or someone else in the other car.
 

rcs

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You strike me as the type who would pester and annoy any good mechanic to the point that he would either "fire" you as a customer or charge you top dollar.

Brakes aren't hard, watch some youtube videos or take a class at community college or something.
That could not be farther from the truth. Just because I am asking questions on a forum, where I feel comfortable as a women to ask questions doesn't mean I would do this in person to a professional,.no matter what their profession is. I have watched videos, I have researched this. I research everything before I pay top dollar for parts or a professional to install them,...could be HVAC, plumber, mechanic etc.
And maybe I fire the professional because they did a poor job, despite me believing in their abilities, and it ended costing me more money, because I did not ask them a few questions. That scenario just happened to me with a whole timing belt job.
 

rcs

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Honda Pilot has crappy rotors, as most Asian vehicles do. It is undersized for that weight and material is not appropriate. So, that is actually what you want to pay attention to. Get better rotors like EBC, Hawk etc.
Akebono from performance stand point is typical ceramic pad. It will do its job and it is made well.
Dynamic Friction is IMO only when you don’t have other options. I have some experience with them and quality is really not something, nowhere near Akebono (there is a reason why Akebono is OE supplier).
If you want more aggressive pad, go EBC GreenStuff or Pagid if available (it was for my Toyota Sienna). But, expect lot more dust.
Oh and I agree, the Honda OEM pads are totally undersized for the weight of my Pilot.
 
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I don't think a shop will be receptive to ask detailed questions about what they clean and lube (with what lube).

You can request they use new hardware (like SS clips) with the new pads.

I like Akebono Pro Act ceramic pads. Good stopping with low dust.
For the price, they are not worth it. Akebonos are not that great any longer.

There many other brands out there can perform at a better cost.
 
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So another brake tidbit. A well made brake pad will have perfectly machined "ears" and will slide properly in the SS clips. And it will have a decent coating or paint to prevent rusting.

A poorly machined pad may need to have the ear filed a bit so it slides in the SS clip. Once you file you remove the coating or paint and invite rust. While rust in the pad in most areas is not a problem, rust around the pad ears while cause then to bind and not slide properly in the SS clips.

You want coated rotors in the rust belt. I always suggest to spend $$ on high quality pads but you only need to get "good" quality rotors. I have been using Wagner E-coated rotors.

Akebono pads at Amazon or RockAuto. Try to get rotors at a place with free shipping like Amazon Prime. Shipping rotors from RockAuto would be a last choice due to high shipping charges.
 
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Akebono pads at Amazon or RockAuto. Try to get rotors at a place with free shipping like Amazon Prime. Shipping rotors from RockAuto would be a last choice due to high shipping charges.
Worth pricing both. If you have an opportunity to get deliveries at your office or another commercial address it's often a cheaper Fedex price zone. RA is pretty literal with shipping quotes, they don't average them like amazon.
 
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With that being said, I knew there were some things that did not get done when I had this brake job done before. Slapping on the rotors and the pads to me is not a complete job.
Just playing devil's advocate, but why says that's not a complete job ? Some people feel those extra steps simply aren't necessary. One can install new brake pads and not lubricate the slide pins and/or clean the caliper brackets and/or re-use old hardware and the brakes can operate just fine.

Anyone can do that, not me of course being a women!
I presume you're saying that sarcastically.
 
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So another brake tidbit. A well made brake pad will have perfectly machined "ears" and will slide properly in the SS clips. And it will have a decent coating or paint to prevent rusting.

A poorly machined pad may need to have the ear filed a bit so it slides in the SS clip. Once you file you remove the coating or paint and invite rust. While rust in the pad in most areas is not a problem, rust around the pad ears while cause then to bind and not slide properly in the SS clips.
I’ve noticed the opposite with Japanese cars(primarily Toyota products) and aftermarket pads having “slop” in the caliper brackets. Wagner, Bendix(both Honeywell and MAT brands), MAT Roulunds(old Duralast and current BrakeBest) and Centric have been offenders. What happens is the pads have so much lateral play that they’ll shift and clunk when the brakes are applied in reverse. Problem doesn’t happen with Akebono, and oddly enough, when I slapped on a set of Wagner TQs on a Subaru, they didn’t clunk.
 

wtd

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The other point is that you are not going to know if any mechanic you choose is going to do the job like you want it done unless you check his work behind him and if you do that, you might as well do the job yourself. Doing brakes in a lot of cases is an easy job.

I do most if not all of the steps that Eric on South Main Auto does and never have any problems. One thing I definitely do these days is to make sure the slide pins are lubed well and with the correct lube because in my early days of doing brakes, I didn't do that and ended up with stuck pins and uneven wear.

Do you have any friends who can do brakes? If so, have them do it so you can watch and help and know exactly how it's being done.
 
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I would have to wonder if you can do it your self with maybe the help of a few you tube videos. The fact that you know to ask these questions already gives you a leg up over probably 95% of the population. For the record, I don’t know many mechanics that are as thorough as someone who would be caring for their own vehicle. Sadly that kind of craftsmanship just isn’t common anymore. I still work that way but I maintain a private fleet of OTR trucks, trailers, forklifts, etc and the company rarely questions a repair I recommend or how long it takes and their equipment shows it in return. I even touch up paint and decals on the forklifts at almost every PM with OEM rattle cans.
 
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I'm kind of thinking that your best bet is to choose a mechanic that's been around for while. Let him choose the parts he's comfortable using. He's probably done thousands of brake jobs and doesn't want a come back. It's great that you're concerned about getting a quality brake job but don't over think this.
 
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rcs

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Just playing devil's advocate, but why says that's not a complete job ? Some people feel those extra steps simply aren't necessary. One can install new brake pads and not lubricate the slide pins and/or clean the caliper brackets and/or re-use old hardware and the brakes can operate just fine.


I presume you're saying that sarcastically.
So I guess I am saying it is not a complete job only due to my limited knowledge. And not really being controversial when I say this, but if some techs do more, grease the pins, remove any rust etc,...wouldn't that be a more thorough job? Again please don't take this as being obstinate, I am merely saying this in conversation.
I am sure there are some women who can and do perform mechanical things on their cars, but I am not one of them. I can diy certain things, but this is not one of them. No disrespect to any women who can work on their own car! I wish I could take a class and learn more hands on.
 

rcs

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Worth pricing both. If you have an opportunity to get deliveries at your office or another commercial address it's often a cheaper Fedex price zone. RA is pretty literal with shipping quotes, they don't average them like amazon.
Oh wow,...thanks for that information,...I did not know that!(y)
 

rcs

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I would have to wonder if you can do it your self with maybe the help of a few you tube videos. The fact that you know to ask these questions already gives you a leg up over probably 95% of the population. For the record, I don’t know many mechanics that are as thorough as someone who would be caring for their own vehicle. Sadly that kind of craftsmanship just isn’t common anymore. I still work that way but I maintain a private fleet of OTR trucks, trailers, forklifts, etc and the company rarely questions a repair I recommend or how long it takes and their equipment shows it in return. I even touch up paint and decals on the forklifts at almost every PM with OEM rattle cans.
I would love to do it myself, but I don't have the lift equipment, and would not trust myself with anything mechanical on my car. But thanks for your reply and support.
 
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