My first try at using 0w oil....

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Exactly what I was thinking.
BC at typical winter starting temps a 20 grade is tens of cSt thinner than a 30 regardless of 0W or 5W
Me, I worry more about fully warmed up viscosity, or I used to when I had 25 or 35 mile one-way, rush hour commutes.
I don't go out if its 10 below 0F or more. I've lost a few alternator bearings and one water pump doing so - on relatively new cars.
More things are lubed than the engine. Idler pulleys, wheel bearings, cv joints and differential too
 

MolaKule

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A reminder fella's. There will still be an oil film left on the parts after shutdown and within that oil film are additives to prevent wear and to reduce friction.

It's not like the films will magically disappear and the DI package will evaporate.
 
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What would be the better cold flow between, you pick the vendor, and a 5-20 v 5-30 weight oil? Wouldn't you need to be well below OF or colder to realize a difference?
My mechanic put 5w20 in 07 es350. It sounded awful on cold starts at 20 degree f. Had him change back to 5w30.
 

ZeeOSix

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My mechanic put 5w20 in 07 es350. It sounded awful on cold starts at 20 degree f. Had him change back to 5w30.
Both are a 5W ... hummm. Was one a full synthetic and the other not? :unsure: What was the sound difference at operating temperature?
 
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As visually entertaining those videos may be, it’s far from the most important aspects of an oil. More of a county fair type of demonstration but without any real significance.

Note too that many of not most of those videos are using an oil that has an inappropriate winter rating for the test temperature.
Which is why I don't like cold pour tests. Yeah a 10w will pour extremely slow if at all at -50°f but it's not designed for that temperature. If you were to place a 0w-30, 0w-20, and 0w-40 side by side and pour them at -35°C they'd probably be very similar, at 32°f the 0w-20 would pour faster, but that doesn't mean a darn thing because none of those oils are too thick to pump at those temperatures. Oil is forced through the engine, not poured or splashed.

Regarding what viscosity is appropriate for OP, if you do lots of short trips (less than 20 minutes) 0w-20 will give you better fuel economy. If your like me and drive 8-12hrs at a time you wouldn't see much difference between 0w-20 and 0w-40, but your engine will not be protected as well with the 0w-20.
 
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So my 2005 Avalon calls for 5w-30. I have been using Full Syn oils in either 5w-30 or 5w-20.
With Michigan winter almost upon me I decided to give 0w-20 a whir. What might I expect in an older car with 185,000 miles and VVT?
If I were you, I would just use 0w20 year round.

0w20 is great for winter, because 0w is great for cold engines.

20 is good for the summer, because it will flow fast when hot. 0w20 flows quicker when cold and hot, compared to 5w20 and 5w30. More flow means better wear protection. Using 0w20 will give you a higher volume of oil flow at all RPMs, which will give you better wear protection.

Ditch the 5w30 and use 5w20 or 0w20.
 
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If I were you, I would just use 0w20 year round.

0w20 is great for winter, because 0w is great for cold engines.

20 is good for the summer, because it will flow fast when hot. 0w20 flows quicker when cold and hot, compared to 5w20 and 5w30. More flow means better wear protection. Using 0w20 will give you a higher volume of oil flow at all RPMs, which will give you better wear protection.

Ditch the 5w30 and use 5w20 or 0w20.
Here we go again.

Flow is irrelevant except for the flow to the pump pickup tube, at any temperature appropriate for the winter rating that will not be an issue. Once it is pumped then flow is not relevant in the sense you’re trying to portray it. Once an oil is pumped it will flow.

Flow is not protection, MOFT is. Thinner oils never, ever protect better than a thicker one. Physics matters.

Where do people get these incorrect notions that they then express with certitude?
 
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As visually entertaining those videos may be, it’s far from the most important aspects of an oil. More of a county fair type of demonstration but without any real significance.

Note too that many of not most of those videos are using an oil that has an inappropriate winter rating for the test temperature.
We don't think ,, we just absorb. My neighbor was buying a hay cutter and he said this certain model of cutter is harsh and causes leaf loss. I had to tell him you have grass hay and not Alfalfa.
 
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That took A LONG TIME! Far longer than I would have guessed. Well over a minute on the top video. It's amazing after watching that, these engines live as long as they do. You would think cold weather operation would kill them off far quicker than running in a warm climate.
You need to pull a valve cover off and watch the oil your self yeah when freezing it takes a bit for a 15 or 20w oil to get tom the top end but that is why there are 0,5,10W depending on starting temps and the big bug a boo is the time the oil takes to go from the sump to the oil pump . any way there is a reason to use multi grades to match the starting temps.
 
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Here we go again.

Flow is irrelevant except for the flow to the pump pickup tube, at any temperature appropriate for the winter rating that will not be an issue. Once it is pumped then flow is not relevant in the sense you’re trying to portray it. Once an oil is pumped it will flow.

Flow is not protection, MOFT is. Thinner oils never, ever protect better than a thicker one. Physics matters.

Where do people get these incorrect notions that they then express with certitude?
Oil 101 AE Hass writings.
 

OVERKILL

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If I were you, I would just use 0w20 year round.

0w20 is great for winter, because 0w is great for cold engines.

20 is good for the summer, because it will flow fast when hot. 0w20 flows quicker when cold and hot, compared to 5w20 and 5w30. More flow means better wear protection. Using 0w20 will give you a higher volume of oil flow at all RPMs, which will give you better wear protection.

Ditch the 5w30 and use 5w20 or 0w20.
Are you not reading the replies to these posts where people are correcting you?
 

FZ1

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So my 2005 Avalon calls for 5w-30. I have been using Full Syn oils in either 5w-30 or 5w-20.
With Michigan winter almost upon me I decided to give 0w-20 a whir. What might I expect in an older car with 185,000 miles and VVT?
I'd try a 0w-30. Jmo
 

ZeeOSix

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20 is good for the summer, because it will flow fast when hot.
Not really. Hot viscosity isn't different enough to make a flow difference. Besides ... PD oil pump, the most misunderstood component in an oiling system.

0w20 flows quicker when cold and hot, compared to 5w20 and 5w30. More flow means better wear protection. Using 0w20 will give you a higher volume of oil flow at all RPMs, which will give you better wear protection.
Again ... PD oil pump. There is the same flow volume because of the pump. Oil pressure and oil flow (as long as it's adequate) doesn't mean better protection. Better protection is achieved by better MOFT, which is a function of the oil viscosity. Has been that way since tribology was discovered 100 years ago, and that fact will never change.
 
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