Liquid titanium and break in oil

Messages
41
Location
youngstown, ohio
I've done a lot of reading in here and come to read that the liquid titanium in kendall is no longer, however I can't find anything in relation to they're HDEO. Does it still retain the liquid titanium?

How does the liquid titanium work with new engine break in? Everything I'm reading states to choose an oil with a higher zinc content. But does the titanium help or hurt during break in periods or is it solely intended as an anti wear additive. I'm also seeing that kendall has a .122% zinc content, is that considered a high or low content?

I really want to run the kendall in this engine, I'm nervous about change from chevron, but it's a solid oil from all I read and has a better price point. Mobile delvac was a choice also, I'm read it has a low zinc content, but I can't confirm that yet.

OR, would I be better off with an oil without titanium, something like boron or moly?

I also read that the kendall has a bad odor when new. The posts were older posts though, is that still a thing with that oil?

I don't run anything that's not available easily to me on the road, so I'm open to suggestions also, but nothing I can't source when I'm in a pinch.

I should add, my typical OCI is 20k miles. New engine will likely get a few hundred miles on it. I'll change the oil, and the new oil will go for maybe 10-15k then drop it and onto my 20k intervals.
 

Attachments

  • 20201128_205439.jpg
    20201128_205439.jpg
    173.8 KB · Views: 37

thejudges69

Thread starter
Messages
41
Location
youngstown, ohio
What does the engine manufacture recommend?
The dealers sell their oil, which is rebottled mobile delvac. But the engines come from the factory with a combination of mobile and Chevron, it was dependant on who's oil met what ratings at the time of manufacturing I understand. And I haven't researched the right oil rating yet, the engine is a 2007 engine but built to a 2000 year model spec.
 

thejudges69

Thread starter
Messages
41
Location
youngstown, ohio
Got this from phillips 66.

Here’s a recap of what we discussed on the phone:

  • Super-D XA/Guardol ECT uses a high level of zinc, phosphorous, and liquid titanium as anti-wear additives. The liquid titanium is our standout component because it is a unique development of ours and promotes superior wear protection. During formulation, much testing is performed, specifically around wear protection. We found superior results with the liquid titanium package than with another type of anti-wear additive.
  • We have performed benchmarking testing against competitor products to confirm our product is performing at a level above. I do have some information to share about that.


Regarding the benchmarking testing, we submitted blind samples of Super-D XA/Guardol ECT, Shell Rotella T5, Chevron Delo 400, Mobil Delvac 1300, and PetroCanada Duron SHP to a lab and had certain testing run on them. The tests were each run 3 times and results were averaged.



The testing we highlighted regarded oxidation control (oil life), corrosion resistance, and wear control.



The oxidation testing we performed included a few tests, but most notably, the deposit performance testing. We performed a Moderately High Temp. Thermo-Oxidation Engine Oil Simulation Test to simulate deposits on the ring belt and piston under-crown, and a High-Temp version of that test to simulate effects from turbocharging. We were able to confirm lower deposits than all three on the first test, but Chevron did beat us on the second one.



The other notable testing was designed around wear protection. We used a test method called the Cameron Plint Wear Test as a way to measure fluid performance between two metal surfaces under a heavy load and high temperatures. At the end of the test, the wear scar between the two metal surfaces is measured. We had equivalent results to Chevron Delo 400 on this one, and beat the other competitors by a little bit with a smaller wear scar.



Here’s the really good wear test: the DD13 Scuffing Test in the 2010 12.8L DD13 engine. This specifically tests what kind of wear is occurring between the piston ring and cylinder, which is where we got our cylinder liner pictures. At this point, we only published results for a couple of our oils since it takes so long and is quite expensive. We were testing our API FA-4 oils since that’s what Detroit is now recommending in their newer engines, and threw Super-D XA/Guardol ECT in as well. Everyone made it to the maximum of 200 hours without scuffing, and the test was stopped before scuffing began. After 200 hours, the sampling begins to affect the oil volume in the crankcase so it can’t continue. Definitely a good feeling to get to the end of 200 hours without any scuffing at all! The way they can tell whether scuffing is occurring is by testing periodic samples for an increase in iron content.



The cylinder liner pictures came from the testing we did on the FA-4 oils, Guardol FE 10W-30 and Kendall SHP FE 5W-30. Since there was concern that these thinner oils would not perform as well, we wanted to highlight their performance to soothe everyone’s nerves about switching. FA-4 hasn’t caught on as quickly, but with Detroit and Ford beginning to require them in factory fill diesels more recently, they may become more popular. They show an improvement in fuel efficiency and that is definitely a desire of the API to lessen environmental impact.



I hope that this does help, and it also confirms another thing: Chevron Delo 400 is another wonderful product for this application. I know that doesn’t make decisions any easier, but you can rest assured that we are not underperforming in comparison!



Let me know if you have any questions, you can respond to this e-mail if you’d like.





Haley Barrows
Lubricants Technical Services – Product Specialist


877-445-9198 – Available Monday-Friday 7am-6pm CT
Phillips66.com
 
Top