Keurig takes a page from the printer industry

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I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
 
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3,080
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
I as well. I wouldn't buy one for myself or give as a gift if it had the chip.
 
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Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
I find it unbelievable anyone would use a K-cup machine and generate so much waste to begin with with [censored] tasting coffee for the price.
 
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2,280
Location
WNY
Some manufacturers are making devices that permantently attach to the brewing head of the Keurig 2.0 that'll fool it.
Originally Posted By: rjundi
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
I find it unbelievable anyone would use a K-cup machine and generate so much waste to begin with with [censored] tasting coffee for the price.
Some cups have nothing more than a plastic ring with a mesh bag. Cut the bag off and recycle the plastic ring. Not that much waste.
 
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Location
Severna Park, MD
I think those Keurig machines are stupid. We tried one (not a commercial model) at my office a few years ago, and burned it up after about a year of heavy use. Now I'm running the coffee mess at my office with an old fashioned Bunn commercial coffee maker and I buy 3-lb cans of Folgers at Sam's Club for about $10. I charge people $6/month or 50¢/day for all they can drink, and get compliments for how good the coffee is. The only difficult part is training people to make a fresh pot when the level gets low and to turn off the burner at the end of the day. There are some applications where a Keurig or similar machine makes sense. At my local Volvo dealer they have a single serving coffee maker for people who are waiting for their cars.
 
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Atlanta,GA
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
It's almost like OEM Certs. Keurig sells licenses to various outside vendors (ie Starbucks) .
 
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Originally Posted By: Rick in PA
Yes, the latest Keurigs have RFI chipped brew cups:
ONLY the commercial ones. The household units use "special" ink and that's it. It's very easy to "fool" it.
 
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Location
North Carolina
Originally Posted By: Chris Meutsch
Originally Posted By: spasm3
They may want to consider what happened to Texas instruments in the early home computer market.
*waits for more information*
TI came out with a home computer in the 1981. It had a lot of memory for the time. One of the first to have plug and play. Lots of expandability at that time. TI chose to not license anyone to make anything for it. They wanted the whole ball of wax. It failed and went under. TI might be in the computer business today if they had let others produce for that system. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Instruments_TI-99/4A
 
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Location
Virginia
Not a fan of K-cups, period. They are very expensive. My 20 year old Mr Coffee 4 cup still makes a great cup of coffee. Yeah, I splurge on Starbucks whole bean French Roast when it goes on sale at Costco. Many people don't mind paying extra for the speed and convenience of K-cups - that's what makes the economy go.
 
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Location
Cape Cod, MA
Originally Posted By: rjundi
I find it unbelievable anyone would use a K-cup machine and generate so much waste to begin with with [censored] tasting coffee for the price.
I agree with this ^^^
Originally Posted By: bigt61
Not a fan of K-cups, period. They are very expensive. My 20 year old Mr Coffee 4 cup still makes a great cup of coffee.
And this ^^^ I do understand that they are good for offices and waiting rooms.
 
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5,707
Location
Atlanta,GA
Originally Posted By: rjundi
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
I find it unbelievable anyone would use a K-cup machine and generate so much waste to begin with with [censored] tasting coffee for the price.
Depends. I have 1-2 cups in morning on weekend. So brewing a full pot would be a waste.
 
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Originally Posted By: BMWTurboDzl
Depends. I have 1-2 cups in morning on weekend. So brewing a full pot would be a waste.
You can make a single cup using any espresso machine. Granted, it may require one or two extra steps (nothing elaborate), but it's a lot cheaper on a per cup basis, and a lot better tasting, too.
 
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Location
Canadia
I have a hard time understanding why consumers feel they have the right to be upset/outraged/etc. over the price of a proprietary consumable for a non-essential product. This isn't Soylent Green. If you don't like the pricing, don't buy the product. The market will decide if Keurig's business model is viable.
 
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6,367
Location
Midwest
Originally Posted By: rjundi
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I find it reprehensible that a coffee maker company would limit their coffee maker to their own coffee. I have an older Keurig that I can use with any brand of K-cup. If something were to happen to it, I would not purchase a Keurig that would not allow me (without some bizarre "hack") to use my choice of coffee. I understand the business model, but I don't agree with it and won't support it. And a quick search for reviews of the Keurig 2.0 system shows that I'm not alone.
I find it unbelievable anyone would use a K-cup machine and generate so much waste to begin with with [censored] tasting coffee for the price.
For starters, it's much less expensive to make a single cup on occasion than it is to make an entire pot. And as far as waste, I use San Francisco Bay coffee that is not only much less expensive than most, but most of the materials of the K cup are biodegradable. To top it off I'm not using the electricity to heat an entire pot of coffee and keep the carafe hot for an hour or more. So your your waste comment is pure and simple ignorance, nothing more. And since taste and flavor are subjective, that portion of your comment is also irrelevant.
 
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Originally Posted By: rjundi
I find it unbelievable anyone would use a K-cup machine and generate so much waste to begin with with [censored] tasting coffee for the price.
I bet you did mean somebody specific here and the comment was aimed specifically at him. How come you did not start the sentence with "Of all the people"? Can you make out if I am taking a jab at you or at the other person?
 
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Originally Posted By: spasm3
TI came out with a home computer in the 1981. It had a lot of memory for the time. One of the first to have plug and play. Lots of expandability at that time. TI chose to not license anyone to make anything for it. They wanted the whole ball of wax. It failed and went under. TI might be in the computer business today if they had let others produce for that system. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Instruments_TI-99/4A
Not true at all. I owned one of them from the 80's up until last year when a flood took it out. TI may not have licensed it but there were plenty of perhiperals for it from 3rd parties. I had a CorComp 360k disk controller card, Myarc RS232/Parallel port card all sitting in the PE Box. Someone even combined the PE box functions into a sidecar unit that put the 32k memory, I/O, and something else into the sidecar. There was also 3rd party cartridges available for it - Atari ported a few of their arcade games (I had Pole Position) and they were different others as well. Yes, some got locked out in later versions but there was a lot of 3rd party stuff... Fun fact: Microsoft wrote Miltiplan for the TI-99/4A. I loved mine - it was my first computer and a surprisingly capable machine!
 
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