Interesting Royal Purple Discussion

Patman

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Oakville, Ontario
I'm confused, that discussion said nothing about moly whatsoever. [Confused] I gotta take the link down anyways, we can't link to other UBBs directly in this forum.
 

ramair8

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Chicago,IL
Sorry, didn't know we could not post links. But here is a quote from the post on a different board in reference to what was said about moly "... Please read the following I received today from the Technical Services folks at Amsoil; I cannot certify these comments other than they are in agreement with my general understanding of molybdenum additives in motor oils, and my experience that Amsoil's testing is in agreement with general industry testing standards. They do not consider RP anything other than a niche player, as do I. You decide: Royal Purple uses a different chemistry than most. They are one of only a handful of marketers using Moly in their oil. Moly is a solid, specifically banned by Cummins, due to excessive valve train wear. Moly (Molybdenum Disulfide) is a processed mineral that is similar in appearance to graphite. Moly has good lubricating properties when used either by itself (in dry power form or as an additive to oil or other lubricants). Particles of the Moly can come out of suspension and agglomerate. This can actually clog oil filters or oil lines and the rest normally settles in the bottom of the oil pan. This seems to be more likely when using extended drain intervals...." Maybe I am not reading it correctly, but from what I understand they are saying moly may not be good for the engine? [Confused] [ January 28, 2003, 10:21 AM: Message edited by: ramair8 ]
 
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IL
Not that again [Roll Eyes] They are either stuck in the 70s or they are knowingly explointing people's ignorance to mislead them. That has nothing to do with modern oils. Nor in the past 15+yrs for that matter. MoTDC is what is used now and the only negative I have heard of is cost. They are also wrong that only a handful are using it. Just about everyone is now. [No no] There are a few other threads on this as well. Try searching around.
 
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4,478
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Southern California
quote:
Originally posted by ramair8: "...Moly is a solid, specifically banned by Cummins, due to excessive valve train wear. Moly (Molybdenum Disulfide) is a processed mineral that is similar in appearance to graphite. Moly has good lubricating properties when used either by itself (in dry power form or as an additive to oil or other lubricants). Particles of the Moly can come out of suspension and agglomerate [emphasis mine - RH]..."
Hmmm... This was what I thought I understood from other sources over the past several years. I posted a question specifically about this issue last week and was informed by this forum's resident experts that the moly was in solution, not suspension, and -couldn't- settle out. Whatever the truth in this matter, I have noted -something- of a finely dispersed solid in the bottom of oil bottles occasionally when I neglected to give the bottle a good, rigorous shake prior to pouring the contents out. This seems to be more likely for oil I've had sitting around more than a couple of months. Chemically the moly is in the form of a molybdenum salt. The anti-wear compounds, Zinc Dithiophosphate and its related compound, Zinc di-dithiophosphate, are other examples of salts. Salts, while readily miscible in water, aren't generally dissolvable in organic liquids, so I had assumed that these compounds were ground extremely fine and added to the oil to permeate about in suspension (leastways until they settled out over time...). Anyway, "ramair8", thanks for posting. Looks like the thinking caps are gonna hafta come out around here! [Big Grin] -Ray Haeffele [ January 28, 2003, 10:57 AM: Message edited by: Ray H ]
 

ramair8

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36
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Chicago,IL
I found a couple things interesting about what he was saying. One the information he posted was what he got from an amsoil rep on royal purple and amsoil does not use moly in their oil, right? Also, I did some searching of his other posts and he the oils he thinks are very good are amosil and redline. Funny thing is, redline has about the most moly of any oil I have seen, yet he does not like royal purple because of the moly in it? [Confused]
 

MolaKule

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ramair, JAson is correct. This has been posted a number of times and has been debunked as many times as posted. Do a search on moly and you will see a number of rebuttals clarifying the actual chemistry and stating the moly dithiocarbamate is stable, in complete solution, and does NOT settle out.
 
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Southern NJ
I posted this same topic awhile ago. They told me the same thing. It isn't compatible with there formulation for some reason. Moly is found in virtually every oil today (good ones) so I don't think Amsoil can knock it.
 
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718
Location
Central Texas
I don't know much about chemistry or blending oil. I do know that I used moly for many years first unknowingly in Pennzoil Long Life and now knowingly in Schaeffers. I've never seen anything drop out of suspension in either of these moly containing oils.
 
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