How can both of these oils be excellent options?

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Hey Guys, I just have a quick question which stems from alot of the advice and discussions which I am commonly reading through. Specifically a "Cheaper" oil and a "Top Tier" oil both being excellent choices for ordinary passenger vehicles (...?) Im just going to use for Example, Chevron Supreme Motor oil (commonly in the $12-$14 for 5 quarts) and Mobil 1 (commonly in the $22 - $30 for 5 quarts). My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use. Is it because the users are typically not trying to over use the oil with an extended OCI or are we strictly looking at TBN to weigh the "Quality" of the oil?
 
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Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys, I just have a quick question which stems from alot of the advice and discussions which I am commonly reading through. Specifically a "Cheaper" oil and a "Top Tier" oil both being excellent choices for ordinary passenger vehicles (...?) Im just going to use for Example, Chevron Supreme Motor oil (commonly in the $12-$14 for 5 quarts) and Mobil 1 (commonly in the $22 - $30 for 5 quarts). My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use. Is it because the users are typically not trying to over use the oil with an extended OCI or are we strictly looking at TBN to weigh the "Quality" of the oil
Chevron Supreme is Group III, hydrocracked, plus Chevron has their own add pack. Also this oil is turbo rated. Mobil 1 EP is also an exceptional value, and is stellar, stellar stuff. Your vehicle, the spec'd oil, and your driving conditions should sway your decision on which oil to use.
 
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Two reasons: 1. Either one would meet or exceed the requirements of the application, and 2. People are talking WAY beyond what they can possibly know.
 
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The new conventional oils are, with some exceptions from what I hear, very close to the performance of full synthetics. The differences are very small, but there are differences to justify one over the other. If your car has a turbo, if you drive in an area of extreme temperatures, if you want to keep your car 10+ years, if you have the standard BITOG oil anxiety syndrome, a full synthetic is a better choice.
 
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Both are good oils when used in their proper applications. Both oils contain mfgr specs and API certification.
Quote
Mobil 1 5W-30 synthetic motor oil meets or exceeds the requirements of: ACEA A1/B1, A5/B5 API SN, SM, SL, SJ, SN PLUS, SN PLUS RESOURCE CONSERVING ILSAC GF-5 Ford WSS-M2C946-A Ford WSS-M2C946-B1 Mobil 1 5W-30 has the following builder approvals: General Motors Service Fill dexos1â„¢ Gen 2 (license number D10104GH015) Honda/Acura HTO-06 Mobil 1 5W-30 is recommended by ExxonMobil for use in applications requiring: General Motors 4718M General Motors 6094M Ford WSS-M2C929-A
Quote
Chevron Supreme Motor Oils meet: • API Service Categories — SN PLUS — SM, SL, SJ and all previous API "S" categories — Resource Conserving for API SN PLUS (SAE 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30) — ILSAC GF-5 (SAE 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30) • manufacturers' performance requirements — FCA US LLC (formerly known as Chrysler Group LLC) MS-6395 (SAE 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30) — FIAT 9.55535-CR-1 (SAE 5W-30) — Ford WSS-M2C945-A (SAE 5W-20) WSS-M2C946-A (SAE 5W-30) — General Motors GM 6094M (SAE 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30)
Look at your OM, if the oil meets the specs (Dexos, Ford, MS6395, ACEA, etc) that oil is adequate for the recommended oil change of that vehicle. For example, a Hyundai 1.6T says use ACEA A1/A5 for 5k ocis. Looking at the spec sheets, Mobil is the better oil for this application as it meets OEM requirements, and should be fine for the rec 5k oci. At the same time, both oils contain the Ford spec. So, if your Ford says use the WSS spec, both oils will be fine for the OEM oci recommendation. People on here fail to realize this sometimes. If your Ford or Nissan or whatever reccomends a 5k oci, both will be fine for that as they both meet spec. The engine isnt going to get hurt. The only thing getting hurt is your pocketbook. I have a hunch theres plenty of people out there running 25-40$ jugs of oil and an expensive 8-15$ oil filter for 5K (average OCI for most) when they would be fine with a 12$ jug and a 3$ filter. shrug
 
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Both are quality brand-name oil that carry API and other industry approvals and ratings. Both Chevron Supreme and Mobil 1 carry API SN (or better) approval, Dexos approval, etc.. Just because one is conventional and one is synthetic does not mean that both can't be used with confidence and excellent results in a given car's engine. My 2013 Altima, for example. Either of these oils would perform exceptionally well in my Altima's 2.5 engine over the course of a 7,500 mile OCI, even though I drive the car year round in Phoenix. Both will provide top-notch lubrication, wear protection, etc.. over the course of the OCI. Of course, a 7,500 mile OCI for me, in this car, is about 3 - 3.5 months. It does not matter that one is conventional and one is synthetic in my case because it almost never drops below freezing here, and hot weather does not increase wear or oxidation inside the engine (which operates at or over 200F almost all the time). Now, if I lived in northern Minnesota or Alaska, and/or if my trips were all very short and my OCI was over a year, then I'd probably want the synthetic to allow for better cold temp flow, etc.. Also, keep in mind that the base stock, while important, is only ONE factor in how well the oil will perform. The additive pack is also VERY important, and I can guarantee that Chevron Supreme conventional has a very good add pack.
 
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Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys... My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use.
Another way to phrase this question is to ask how a 12-foot ladder and a 15-foot ladder are both adequate for getting out of a 10-foot hole. The answer is they both exceed the requirements for success. cheers
 
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Originally Posted by Imp4
Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys... My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use.
Another way to phrase this question is to ask how a 12-foot ladder and a 15-foot ladder are both adequate for getting out of a 10-foot hole. The answer is they both exceed the requirements for success. cheers
You beat me to it. I suspect the OP's question has more to do with economics that oil performance - he's questioning the difference in dough, not in stuff in the oil - all other things being equal, the 15' ladder will be more expensive.
 
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Originally Posted by d00df00d
2. People are talking WAY beyond what they can possibly know.
Without this...would BITOG even exist.... grin2
 
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Just use the weight and spec type the manufacturer recommends. For many vehicles manufactured today that doesn't offer a very large window of choice. Years back that wasn't the case. You could pretty much run anything and it wouldn't matter. But now as engines get more complicated with computer codes, variable valve timing, along with cylinder deactivation systems, turbochargers, and all the rest, they require a limited range of oils to choose from. Everyone who cares about their cars wants to use a good grade of oil. That said everything has it's limits. Most won't pay $90+ for 5 quarts of "boutique oil". Simply because they are not convinced it's twice as good as brand name $35 oil.
 
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Originally Posted by Imp4
Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys... My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use.
Another way to phrase this question is to ask how a 12-foot ladder and a 15-foot ladder are both adequate for getting out of a 10-foot hole. The answer is they both exceed the requirements for success. cheers
Good analogy.👍
Originally Posted by SirTanon
Also, keep in mind that the base stock, while important, is only ONE factor in how well the oil will perform. The additive pack is also VERY important, and I can guarantee that Chevron Supreme conventional has a very good add pack.
Very true.. it's not like Chevron has its own additives R&D Div. coughs *Oronite* coughs, or anything....
 
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Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys, I just have a quick question which stems from alot of the advice and discussions which I am commonly reading through. Specifically a "Cheaper" oil and a "Top Tier" oil both being excellent choices for ordinary passenger vehicles (...?) Im just going to use for Example, Chevron Supreme Motor oil (commonly in the $12-$14 for 5 quarts) and Mobil 1 (commonly in the $22 - $30 for 5 quarts). My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use. Is it because the users are typically not trying to over use the oil with an extended OCI or are we strictly looking at TBN to weigh the "Quality" of the oil?
The M1 is generally good for at least 10K miles, but the Chevron Supreme (which is actually a synthetic BLEND in 5W20 & 5W30) is one of the better so-called lower priced oils, and could be used for full OLM life-which in my Transit 250's case, is almost 10K miles (usually 9200-9500). If you're not driving in uber-cold arctic conditions, and don't believe in pushing oil changes too far, Chevron Supreme would be a great choice. Of course, Mobil 1 has much better marketing... crazy
 
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Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys, I just have a quick question which stems from alot of the advice and discussions which I am commonly reading through. Specifically a "Cheaper" oil and a "Top Tier" oil both being excellent choices for ordinary passenger vehicles (...?) Im just going to use for Example, Chevron Supreme Motor oil (commonly in the $12-$14 for 5 quarts) and Mobil 1 (commonly in the $22 - $30 for 5 quarts). My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use. Is it because the users are typically not trying to over use the oil with an extended OCI or are we strictly looking at TBN to weigh the "Quality" of the oil?
The different interval you use each of the oils.
 
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Originally Posted by d00df00d
2. People are talking WAY beyond what they can possibly know.
Can you provide an example of what you mean..as it relates to the OP's question???
 
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Originally Posted by JLTD
Originally Posted by ad244
Hey Guys, I just have a quick question which stems from alot of the advice and discussions which I am commonly reading through. Specifically a "Cheaper" oil and a "Top Tier" oil both being excellent choices for ordinary passenger vehicles (...?) Im just going to use for Example, Chevron Supreme Motor oil (commonly in the $12-$14 for 5 quarts) and Mobil 1 (commonly in the $22 - $30 for 5 quarts). My question is: How can both of these oils be recommended and praised as excellent oils when one is conventional, not specifically formulated for extreme or extended use. Is it because the users are typically not trying to over use the oil with an extended OCI or are we strictly looking at TBN to weigh the "Quality" of the oil?
The different interval you use each of the oils.
Uhh, They both meet Ford spec, so If a N/A Fiesta or Focus recommends 10k ocis, theyll ideally both go 10k mi, because ford has approved it. I'm sure mobil 1 could probably further, but a car under warranty, extended oil changes can be considered "neglectful maintenance" in the eyes of the OEM who says 10k and no more. Under warranty, any oil that meets the OEM spec and is API certified should be able to cover the recommended oci. After the warranty is up, extend all you want, but for warranty purposes on a vehicle such as a Ford, where both oils meet spec, Mobil 1 is equal to Supreme and any other Ford specced oil
 
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bullwinkle's answer is best here. It comes down to chemical stability & film strength. Sometimes you really need Mobil1's better toughness, as in when you have a turbo engine, or when driving hard, and certainly if pushing beyond the limits of an Oil Change Interval in an engine spec'ed for basic economy SN oil. Example: GM says Chevron Supreme isn't good enough to go the full Oil Life Monitor oil change time & miles, and they have a set of tests to ensure the Mobil1 is good enough to go in their engines (dexos1 performance & viscometric tests). Today, German engine oil performance specs demand the best oils, resulting in typically longer oil change intervals as well as better engine protection for hard driving.
 
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Originally Posted by paoester
bullwinkle's answer is best here. It comes down to chemical stability & film strength. Sometimes you really need Mobil1's better toughness, as in when you have a turbo engine, or when driving hard, and certainly if pushing beyond the limits of an Oil Change Interval in an engine spec'ed for basic economy SN oil. Example: GM says Chevron Supreme isn't good enough to go the full Oil Life Monitor oil change time & miles, and they have a set of tests to ensure the Mobil1 is good enough to go in their engines (dexos1 performance & viscometric tests). Today, German engine oil performance specs demand the best oils, resulting in typically longer oil change intervals as well as better engine protection for hard driving.
Can you explain the difference in prices according to your answer - or bullwinkle's? I believe the OP was concerned about it.
 
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People often fail to accept that the "name" on a product alone dictates a price difference. "Paying for a name" is a very, very true phrase.
 
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Originally Posted by hallstevenson
People often fail to accept that the "name" on a product alone dictates a price difference. "Paying for a name" is a very, very true phrase.
Best answer so far. Thanks.
 
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Originally Posted by OilReport99
Can you explain the difference in prices according to your answer - or bullwinkle's? I believe the OP was concerned about it.
Mobil1's Group3 base oil is more highly refined, more expensive to make, than oils that are mostly Group2 conventional like Supreme. Not much difference in the addtive package cost to the maker for either oil. Kind of like expensive Vodka vs. the cheaper ones: More stages of distillation, more time and effort goes into making Gray Goose compared to Barton.
 
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