Fram Ultra Synthetic: Flow Restriction, Bypass Setting, and Fine Filtration

4WD

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Instead of a compromise mid point flow … they have a high and low stage as the vane assembly changes position within the axis of symmetry. Otherwise how would you explain the rapid increase in pressure when I first punch it rather than when it reaches max RPM on that gear. They are also feeding piston jets in more and more cases …
 
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Originally Posted by 4WD
Instead of a compromise mid point flow … they have a high and low stage as the vane assembly changes position within the axis of symmetry. Otherwise how would you explain the rapid increase in pressure when I first punch it rather than when it reaches max RPM on that gear. They are also feeding piston jets in more and more cases …
Yes, they are typically "two step", but didn't want to get into all that. Basic point is say for example at idle, a variable flow PD pump will be putting out less flow than a non-variable pump at idle, or even less flow at higher RPM depending on how the pump is designed and computer controlled. The whole goal for the engineer of a variable flow pump is to reduce the pumping loss (HP) as much as possible to gain fuel economy and still provide adequate lubrication to the engine and still make it last it's design life goal.
 

4WD

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That is if the engine does not shut down completely (my newest blood pressure spikes) … ...¡
 
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293
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MN
Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
Originally Posted by 4WD
Instead of a compromise mid point flow … they have a high and low stage as the vane assembly changes position within the axis of symmetry. Otherwise how would you explain the rapid increase in pressure when I first punch it rather than when it reaches max RPM on that gear. They are also feeding piston jets in more and more cases …
Yes, they are typically "two step", but didn't want to get into all that. Basic point is say for example at idle, a variable flow PD pump will be putting out less flow than a non-variable pump at idle, or even less flow at higher RPM depending on how the pump is designed and computer controlled. The whole goal for the engineer of a variable flow pump is to reduce the pumping loss (HP) as much as possible to gain fuel economy and still provide adequate lubrication to the engine and still make it last it's design life goal.
Wow. Kind of like the variable vane geometry turbos, except two steps instead of infinitely variable? Wonder what kind of fuel economy improvements all these little savings add up to. Seems less durable as well (compared to old gerotor)?
 
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25,916
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Originally Posted by LubricatusObsess
Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
Originally Posted by 4WD
Instead of a compromise mid point flow … they have a high and low stage as the vane assembly changes position within the axis of symmetry. Otherwise how would you explain the rapid increase in pressure when I first punch it rather than when it reaches max RPM on that gear. They are also feeding piston jets in more and more cases …
Yes, they are typically "two step", but didn't want to get into all that. Basic point is say for example at idle, a variable flow PD pump will be putting out less flow than a non-variable pump at idle, or even less flow at higher RPM depending on how the pump is designed and computer controlled. The whole goal for the engineer of a variable flow pump is to reduce the pumping loss (HP) as much as possible to gain fuel economy and still provide adequate lubrication to the engine and still make it last it's design life goal.
Wow. Kind of like the variable vane geometry turbos, except two steps instead of infinitely variable? Wonder what kind of fuel economy improvements all these little savings add up to. Seems less durable as well (compared to old gerotor)?
Not enough to make it that complicated IMO. I'm glad none of my vehicles have a computer controlled oil pump.
 
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10,001
Location
Waco, TX
Originally Posted by viscous
Originally Posted by kschachn
"Flow" is not a concern in a passenger car oil filter.
Why not? Would it be a concern in smaller 4-cycle engines?
Only can size - - some small engines have a very small volume oil pump. A Fram 3600 will thread onto a Briggs 15HP engine, but it will take a minute to fill up because the oil pump is tiny
 

viscous

Thread starter
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208
Originally Posted by Linctex
Originally Posted by viscous
Originally Posted by kschachn
"Flow" is not a concern in a passenger car oil filter.
Why not? Would it be a concern in smaller 4-cycle engines?
Only can size - - some small engines have a very small volume oil pump. A Fram 3600 will thread onto a Briggs 15HP engine, but it will take a minute to fill up because the oil pump is tiny
Is the large can still a problem if the filter has an ADBV?
 
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Originally Posted by viscous
Originally Posted by Linctex
Originally Posted by viscous
Originally Posted by kschachn
"Flow" is not a concern in a passenger car oil filter.
Why not? Would it be a concern in smaller 4-cycle engines?
Only can size - - some small engines have a very small volume oil pump. A Fram 3600 will thread onto a Briggs 15HP engine, but it will take a minute to fill up because the oil pump is tiny
Is the large can still a problem if the filter has an ADBV?
No if the ADBV does it's job.
 
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