Ethernet enabled HDMI vs dedicated Ethernet cable

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I have a Roku player connected to a TV with an HDMI cable that also has Ethernet capability. (see pic below). The Roku is connected to my router via cat5e ethernet cable. i wanted to connect the TV (an internet capable TV) to the internet using a cat5e cable directly to my router. (TV has wifi capability but I prefer hard wired). Then i found out i don't have an ethernet cable frown and thought i'd connect via wifi for now. I went to do that, and in addition to the SSID of our network, the TV also detected "DIRECT/Roku" as an option and for a moment I was confused. Then I remembered that the HDMI cable between the Roku and TV is one of those "ETHERNET CAPABLE" HDMI cables !! (and the roku is hard wired to router) So, my question is, would this internet capable HDMI cable work as good as a DEDICATED ethernet cable, connecting the TV to the router...? or should I just get a dedicated ethernet cable just for peace of mind? -Would the fact that the internet connection is "passed through" the Roku have any negative effects vs a dedicated cat5e going from the router directly to the TV? This is what this HDMI cable looks like: Amazon description:
Quote:
The versatile cable’s built-in Ethernet allows for sharing an Internet connection among multiple devices—no need for separate Ethernet cables.
 
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Well, for starters, both your TV and the Roku would need to support Ethernet over HDMI which is a pretty rare feature as far as I know. You need more than just the right cable for that to work. So my first question is, as it's connected now without wireless, can your TV get to the Internet?
 
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if you are not certain that your TV's HDMI supports Ethernet over HDMI functionality, otherwise: it's best to just simply keep ethernet separate from HDMI. I have a Samsung Smart TV, a TV box (wi-fi capable) and I set them both up using wi-fi (Actiontec wifi box upstairs,about 10ft away, through the floorboard), and no issues connecting via wifi (I have HDMI connections set up between that TV box and my Samsung, mind you). Q.
 

97tbird

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I didn't connect it yet; BUT I thought if the TV's HDMI (it's a 2014 model) didn't support it (I know the roku does), it wouldn't have detected it ?? (old TV never did) But you guys are right, even if it does work, I am going to get a longer dedicated Cat cable and connect the TV directly..and perhaps test both and see if there's a difference.
 
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Originally Posted By: 97tbird
I have a Roku player connected to a TV with an HDMI cable that also has Ethernet capability. (see pic below). The Roku is connected to my router via cat5e ethernet cable. i wanted to connect the TV (an internet capable TV) to the internet using a cat5e cable directly to my router. (TV has wifi capability but I prefer hard wired). Then i found out i don't have an ethernet cable frown and thought i'd connect via wifi for now. I went to do that, and in addition to the SSID of our network, the TV also detected "DIRECT/Roku" as an option and for a moment I was confused. Then I remembered that the HDMI cable between the Roku and TV is one of those "ETHERNET CAPABLE" HDMI cables !! (and the roku is hard wired to router) So, my question is, would this internet capable HDMI cable work as good as a DEDICATED ethernet cable, connecting the TV to the router...? or should I just get a dedicated ethernet cable just for peace of mind? -Would the fact that the internet connection is "passed through" the Roku have any negative effects vs a dedicated cat5e going from the router directly to the TV? This is what this HDMI cable looks like: Amazon description:
Quote:
The versatile cable’s built-in Ethernet allows for sharing an Internet connection among multiple devices—no need for separate Ethernet cables.
Just for reference, the "ROKU DIRECT" SSID is the one for the remote control. They are paired via wifi.
 
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I see no reason not to. Any modern ethernet technology is going to be able to fully support the internet speeds and much more most likely. If it connects, use it.
 
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