Ethernet has a Self-Assigned IP address

Gebo

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Well, it won't work on ethernet after I plugged the other cables in the Netgear. What gives? LOL


I'll stay on wireless awaiting your help.
 

OVERKILL

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I have no yellow ports that I can see. I'm gonna send a pic of the back of the modem. I want to understand.

The Arris modem is only connected to my Eero Pro 6 router as pictured above. I then have my Eero plugged into port 1

Most home routers have a built-in switch with something like 4 or 5 ports (often yellow), yours doesn't, but the way the instructions suggested, it looked like they wanted you to run your internet into the switch and then the router also into the switch, for the internet, which isn't going to work. This is because they are referring to an Access Point, but didn't use a picture of one for whatever reason and "Internet" in their pictures would actually be the LAN port on your router.

Sounds like you have it hooked up properly, not sure what happened the first time around there, but glad to hear it is working properly now.
 

OVERKILL

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Well, it won't work on ethernet after I plugged the other cables in the Netgear. What gives? LOL


I'll stay on wireless awaiting your help.
OK, start over.

Just the router and your computer plugged into the switch. Keep adding devices, slowly, until you break it. That will tell you what device is causing the problem, we'll investigate from there.
 
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Some cable modems can also function as routers. The CM8200 does not include that function. It must be connected to a router to serve Internet to more than one device.

If you plug one PC into the cable modem directly, it will go online. This is because the cable company issues one IP address to the first DHCP client to request one through the modem. That client should of course be your router. Additional DHCP requests will be rejected or ignored. The reason that the cable company only issues one IP is that it is a public IP, and in the case of IPv4, those are scarce.

So it's important that the Eero holds the one IP that you are allowed from the cable company, and it then routes everything in the house from its other port out to the Internet. Generally, unplugging the modem from power (you can leave it connected to the cable, or not) and leaving it off for 30 minutes will cause the cable company to reset your line and be ready to issue the one IP to a new connection.
 

Gebo

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It's gonna take some time as my ethernet cables are run all over my house and they are not labeled. LOL

This morning I have ethernet on this iMac and downstairs ROKU but only wireless on upstairs ROKU and iMac.

It's really weird as I have "spotty" ethernet?????
 
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Identifying the cables will of course help tremendously with troubleshooting.

Make sure you don't have any loops-- that is a cable which instead of going to an endpoint device is plugged back into another port on the switch. Depending on the switch this can create a situation that jams the whole network.
 

Gebo

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Identifying the cables will of course help tremendously with troubleshooting.

Make sure you don't have any loops-- that is a cable which instead of going to an endpoint device is plugged back into another port on the switch. Depending on the switch this can create a situation that jams the whole network.
OK

Should I get one of those LAN testers from Home Depot? Would that help me trace the lines?

No printer works.

I wish I were not so ignorant.
 

Gebo

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I keep getting that "self assigned port message" even on my printer.
 

Gebo

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I gotta leave for 4 hours. I'm not ignoring any responses. I'll be back.
 
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Make sure the eero system is not in its "bridge mode." That may have been the case with DSL but since the CM8200 cable modem is always a bridge you don't want to continue bridging in the eero.

What @OVERKILL said-- migrate to the new switch by unplugging all the cables and setting the old switch aside. Connect one port of the new switch to the eero router. Traditionally the highest numbered port is used for this, then connect the endpoint device cables one at a time to the lower ports starting from 1.

If the light on the switch doesn't come on when you plug in a cable, assume for now that cable doesn't go to an active device, and set it aside. When the light does come on, go through the house to find which device has its link light newly on, and label the cable. If you have devices with no link lights you can test for a link by plugging in one of the old switches instead of the device.
 

OVERKILL

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Make sure the eero system is not in its "bridge mode." That may have been the case with DSL but since the CM8200 cable modem is always a bridge you don't want to continue bridging in the eero.

What @OVERKILL said-- migrate to the new switch by unplugging all the cables and setting the old switch aside. Connect one port of the new switch to the eero router. Traditionally the highest numbered port is used for this, then connect the endpoint device cables one at a time to the lower ports starting from 1.

If the light on the switch doesn't come on when you plug in a cable, assume for now that cable doesn't go to an active device, and set it aside. When the light does come on, go through the house to find which device has its link light newly on, and label the cable. If you have devices with no link lights you can test for a link by plugging in one of the old switches instead of the device.
I'm wondering if the cable he was using to connect the two D-Link switches together is being plugged in and creating a loop at this point.

I assume the EERO config is correct, since it was working fine with the two cheap D-Link switches.
 

Gebo

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Overkill and mk378, I am through 8 connections and quitting for tonight. ALL is fantastic!!! It was so nice to hear my printers come in when I plugged them in the new switch. :p:p:p:p:p:p:p

Gotta get my Arlo, one more Roku, 2 DVD’s and 2 AV systems up and I’m good to go.

Should I connect my 2TVs with Ethernet?

My speed is 150 when checked on my phone but 93-95 when checked through the wired Roku’s and 73-75 wirelessly. Is that what it should be?

Lastly, is there a best type of connector to use between my house cable and the outside cable?
 

OVERKILL

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Overkill and mk378, I am through 8 connections and quitting for tonight. ALL is fantastic!!! It was so nice to hear my printers come in when I plugged them in the new switch. :p:p:p:p:p:p:p

Gotta get my Arlo, one more Roku, 2 DVD’s and 2 AV systems up and I’m good to go.

Should I connect my 2TVs with Ethernet?

My speed is 150 when checked on my phone but 93-95 when checked through the wired Roku’s and 73-75 wirelessly. Is that what it should be?

Lastly, is there a best type of connector to use between my house cable and the outside cable?

Keep us posted!

When you say "cable" what are you referencing, Coax or Ethernet?
 
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93-95 when checked through the wired Roku’s
This is because they don't have gigabit Ethernet ports, their highest speed on the cable is 100 Mb, which leads to about 94 usable Mb. This is the case with a lot of TVs and printers as well. If only one of the green lights above the port on the GS316 lights up instead of both, the link is running at 100. Your old switches would indicate this with a yellow light for 100 or a green light for 1000. I see in the pictures that many of the lights are yellow.

There's nothing wrong with this, since a printer or single video stream doesn't require anything close to 100 Mb to fully function. With a gigabit switch and cat 6 cable, the house is ready should you change out the endpoint device to gigabit.
 

Gebo

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Coax. Connecting the outside cable coming up out of the ground to my inside wire at the box outside my house.

I have "certified 6A" ethernet cable.


Is there any reason to connect my 2 Sony's to the ethernet?
 
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Gebo

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Man, you guys have really helped me. I don't understand what I was doing wrong. How simple is plugging in ethernet cables?????

I did go much slower as I was tracking down the cables and labeling them.

When the installer put my new Eero Pro 6 system in, he put the main router in my basement. I am paying for 150. I live in a ranch style home. Upstairs he installed 3 Eero Extenders. One in living room, one in BR and one in a hallway. Does adding more extenders hurt my performance?
 

Gebo

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These last few Ethernet cables are gonna be very hard to track down. Too many walls and no lights on the devices.

Can I get one of those tone things from Home Depot and use it to determine what line is what? I think I have determined
I am gonna have a few left over ethernet cables.
 
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Quad shield RG6 should be used to attach the modem to the cable company. If you don't also have cable TV service, the cable should be from the cable company drop to your modem with no branches and as few splices as possible. Of course if you do have cable TV service it will need to split off to the TV(s), but audit the installation to see that there are no extra splitters etc. that typically build up over the years.

If the coax situation is at all sketchy you could also relocate the modem nearer where the cable comes into the house, then run cat 6 from it to the router.

You can trace Ethernet cables with what you have now, in particular the two 8-port switches that are now spare. In the basement, plug the remaining unknown / dead Ethernet cables into one of the old switches. Plug this switch into power, but do NOT connect it to the network. None of the link lights should come on, since the other end of the cables is unconnected. Then go upstairs and use the other old switch to energize one of the unknown cables with an Ethernet carrier. The light should come on (green). Go back to the basement and see which cable lit up on the switch.

It would work best to connect the other Eero nodes by Ethernet to your new switch so they can reach the Internet more directly than having to link wirelessly to the basement. This should occur automatically as you plug the Ethernet in.

Also try to site them in the same rooms that have heavy WiFi usage. The two ports on the Eero can be used to pass through Ethernet to a TV or other device while it is also acting as a WiFi AP, so you can share one cable drop to the basement.
 
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Gebo

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This is because they don't have gigabit Ethernet ports, their highest speed on the cable is 100 Mb, which leads to about 94 usable Mb. This is the case with a lot of TVs and printers as well. If only one of the green lights above the port on the GS316 lights up instead of both, the link is running at 100. Your old switches would indicate this with a yellow light for 100 or a green light for 1000. I see in the pictures that many of the lights are yellow.

There's nothing wrong with this, since a printer or single video stream doesn't require anything close to 100 Mb to fully function. With a gigabit switch and cat 6 cable, the house is ready should you change out the endpoint device to gigabit.
I finally understand.
 
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